Egyptian family stunned after father 'returns from dead'

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A picture showing Mohammad el-Gammal when he was found alive after he went missing and his family thought he died. (Youm 7 newspaper)
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Mohammad el-Gammal after he was found alive. (Youm 7 newspaper)
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Updated 19 July 2020

Egyptian family stunned after father 'returns from dead'

  • Gammal's family thought they had held his funeral four months ago
  • He had suffered from mental illness and would often disappear for up to a month at a time

CAIRO: The family of an Egyptian man who they thought had died and been buried have been left stunned after he appeared to come back from the dead.
Mohammed El-Gammal, who is in his 40s, was found wandering out of a cemetery in the village of Kafr Al-Hosar in the Sharqiyah region north of Cairo.
However, his family thought they had held his funeral four months ago after they incorrectly identified another corpse as being El-Gammal.
El-Gammal, who had worked as a teacher and is married with children, had suffered from mental illness and would often disappear for up to a month at a time, a village resident told Youm 7 news website.
But in January he went missing and never returned. His family kept searching for him until they received a call from a relative who worked at a local hospital.
The relative told them that an unidentified dead body had arrived at the hospital and the family went to see if it was El-Gammal.
They all believed the corpse was his apart from one of his sisters.
The report said a DNA sample was taken from the body but the result was never received by the family and the funeral took place on March 21.
Four months later, the real El-Gammal was found alive by youths over the weekend and taken to the nearest police station.


TWITTER POLL: More than three-quarters say no to failing Turkish lira

Updated 22 September 2020

TWITTER POLL: More than three-quarters say no to failing Turkish lira

  • Lira has lost half its value since 2017
  • Poll finds more than 80% would not invest in falling currency

DUBAI: The Turkish lira has plummeted 22 percent this year, but an Arab News Twitter poll found that most people still don’t have the confidence to invest in the tumbling currency.

About 18 percent of the 1,438 respondents said that a weak lira was worth investing in, while nearly 82 percent said the risk was too great.

Traders will buy currency when it is weak, but tend to only do so if there is confidence that it will eventually climb back up in value – thus making a profit.

The lira – already impacted by the coronavirus and President Recep Erdogan’s authoritarian style of leadership – has suffered increased problems as he printed more money to bolster spending, but instead his plan led to a further devaluation.

Turkey and Erdogan are facing widespread condemnation for their foreign policy, which has seen the country intrude into Greek-claimed waters and interference in Libya and Syria.

There is also growing concern of civil unrest inside the country.

On Monday the currency reached record lows, touching 7.6 against the US dollar – it has lost half its value since the end of 2017.