Egyptian family stunned after father 'returns from dead'

Egyptian family stunned after father 'returns from dead'
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A picture showing Mohammad el-Gammal when he was found alive after he went missing and his family thought he died. (Youm 7 newspaper)
Egyptian family stunned after father 'returns from dead'
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Mohammad el-Gammal after he was found alive. (Youm 7 newspaper)
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Updated 19 July 2020

Egyptian family stunned after father 'returns from dead'

Egyptian family stunned after father 'returns from dead'
  • Gammal's family thought they had held his funeral four months ago
  • He had suffered from mental illness and would often disappear for up to a month at a time

CAIRO: The family of an Egyptian man who they thought had died and been buried have been left stunned after he appeared to come back from the dead.
Mohammed El-Gammal, who is in his 40s, was found wandering out of a cemetery in the village of Kafr Al-Hosar in the Sharqiyah region north of Cairo.
However, his family thought they had held his funeral four months ago after they incorrectly identified another corpse as being El-Gammal.
El-Gammal, who had worked as a teacher and is married with children, had suffered from mental illness and would often disappear for up to a month at a time, a village resident told Youm 7 news website.
But in January he went missing and never returned. His family kept searching for him until they received a call from a relative who worked at a local hospital.
The relative told them that an unidentified dead body had arrived at the hospital and the family went to see if it was El-Gammal.
They all believed the corpse was his apart from one of his sisters.
The report said a DNA sample was taken from the body but the result was never received by the family and the funeral took place on March 21.
Four months later, the real El-Gammal was found alive by youths over the weekend and taken to the nearest police station.


Lab-grown meat to go on sale in Singapore in world first

Updated 02 December 2020

Lab-grown meat to go on sale in Singapore in world first

Lab-grown meat to go on sale in Singapore in world first
  • Demand for sustainable alternatives to meat is rising due to growing consumer pressure

SINGAPORE: Lab-grown chicken will soon be available in restaurants in Singapore, after the city-state became the first to green-light meat created without slaughtering any animals.
US start-up Eat Just said Wednesday that its meat had been approved for sale in the city-state as an ingredient in chicken nuggets.
The news marks a “breakthrough for the global food industry,” said the company, as firms increasingly try to find less environmentally harmful ways of producing meat.
“I’m sure that our regulatory approval for cultured meat will be the first of many in Singapore and in countries around the globe,” said Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just.
Consumption of regular meat is an environmental threat as cattle produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas, while logging forests to make way for animals destroys natural barriers against climate change.
Demand for sustainable alternatives to meat is rising due to growing consumer pressure, but other products in the market are plant-based.
There were concerns lab-grown varieties would be too expensive, but a spokesman for Eat Just said the company had made “considerable progress” in lowering the cost.
“Right from the start, we will be at price parity for premium chicken at a high-end restaurant,” he said.
He did not reveal the price of the nuggets but said they would be launched soon at a Singapore restaurant, before other products including lab-grown chicken breasts are rolled out.
Eat Just hopes to bring down the cost to below that of conventional chicken in the coming years, the spokesman added.
The company conducted over 20 production runs in 1,200-liter bioreactors to make the chicken alternative, and checks on safety and quality showed its “cultured” product — the term for meat grown in labs from animal cells — met food standards.
Meat consumption is projected to increase over 70 percent by 2050, and lab-grown alternatives have a role to play in ensuring a safe, secure food supply, Eat Just said.
“Working in partnership with the broader agriculture sector and forward-thinking policymakers, companies like ours can help meet the increased demand for animal protein as our population climbs to 9.7 billion by 2050,” said company CEO Tetrick.
The Singapore Food Agency, the city-state’s regulator, confirmed it had approved the sale of Eat Just’s lab-grown chicken in nuggets after concluding it was safe for consumption.
The agency said it had put in place a framework for “novel foods” which do not have a history of being consumed by humans to ensure safety standards are met before they go on sale.
The high-tech city-state has become a hub for the development of sustainable foods in recent years, with local start-ups concocting dishes suited to Asian palates.
These range from lab-grown “seafood” to dumplings made with tropical fruit instead of pork.