Plague to protein: Israeli firm seeks to put locusts on the menu

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Updated 04 August 2020

Plague to protein: Israeli firm seeks to put locusts on the menu

  • Some goods produced in the Golan Heights face export restrictions, including strict labeling requirements, because most of the international community does not recognize Israeli sovereignty in the area

GOLAN HEIGHTS: From biblical plague to modern-day protein, one Israeli firm wants to make locusts a sustainable food choice in the Holy Land and beyond.
As for whether or not the insects are kosher, the answer is not so simple.
At Hargol Foodtech’s farm in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, a rectangular enclosure that once served as a chicken coop is filled with thousands of locusts, a grasshopper species that has a highly destructive swarming phase.
Contained in a series of meticulously stacked, climate-controlled mesh cages, the insects are served wheatgrass through their three-month life-cycle, before being cooled, killed and baked.
Hargol’s chief executive Dror Tamir said that he grew up hearing stories of how locusts destroyed the fields of his kibbutz in the 1950s.
Yet the Yemenite Jews in the area did not view locusts as crop-ruining pests, but as an edible source of nutrients, Tamir recalled.
As an adult, Tamir became a food and nutrition entrepreneur increasingly concerned about the environmental cost of providing the world’s growing population with enough animal protein.
Tamir said he founded Hargol — Hebrew for grasshopper — 6.5 years ago after realizing the insects were the solution.
The company’s goal is to be “the first in the world to grow grasshoppers on a commercial scale, and provide the world with a healthier and more sustainable source of protein.”
Ram Reifen, a professor of human nutrition at Hebrew University, agreed that the planet is facing growing food supply challenges.
With Earth’s population expected to hit 10 billion by 2050, raising livestock to feed the planet will become increasingly unsustainable, given the massive water and land resources required.
“The fear is there will be a scarcity of protein,” Reifen said. Tamir said that unprocessed locusts consist of more than 70 percent protein and contain all amino acids, along with other nutrients.

HIGHLIGHT

At Hargol Foodtech’s farm in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, a rectangular enclosure that once served as a chicken coop is filled with thousands of locusts, a grasshopper species that has a highly destructive swarming phase.

“What they do lack is saturated fat and cholesterol,” he said. “They have the good stuff. They don’t have the bad stuff.”
According to his own estimate, around 2.5 billion people — mainly in developing nations — consume insects as part of their regular diet.
And, the “most widely eaten insects in the world are grasshoppers,” Tamir said.
But, he added, “when trying to target North American and European customers, it’s really hard to overcome the ‘yuck’ factor.”
To make their product more palatable to Westerners, Hargol turns locusts into powder, which can be mixed into various foods.
Tamir said they were about to launch sales of locust-enhanced pancake mix and smoothie powders worldwide.
Some goods produced in the Golan Heights face export restrictions, including strict labeling requirements, because most of the international community does not recognize Israeli sovereignty in the area.


Did Biden just ‘Inshallah’ Trump on his taxes during the US presidential debate? 

Updated 30 September 2020

Did Biden just ‘Inshallah’ Trump on his taxes during the US presidential debate? 

DUBAI: Shortly after the US presidential debate, Muslims took to social media to have their own debate on whether former Vice President Joe Biden used the Islamic term “Inshallah” with President Donald Trump.
During the televised debate that aired on Tuesday, Biden pushed his rival to release his tax returns.
Trump said his records would be released “when they were ready,” after he was asked about a New York Times report that said the president had only paid $750 in federal income taxes in 2016 and 2017, and none in 10 of the previous 15 years. 
“When? Inshallah,” Biden butted in, leading social media users to begin their own debate on whether the Vice President used the Arabic word for “God willing.”

 


Although the term is often used in its true meaning by Muslims, it has also been known to have been used informally by some to indicate something is unlikely to happen.

 


“Did he really say Inshallah tho(ough)?” One user commented on the video that was shared by Araby Society on the social media platform, Instagram. 
Although another wrote: “I heard ‘when…in July?”

 

 

 

 

 


In what some say was the most chaotic presidential debate in recent years, the two men frequently talked over each other with Trump interrupting, nearly shouting, so often that Biden eventually snapped at him, “Will you shut up, man?”
“The fact is that everything he’s said so far is simply a lie,” Biden said. “I’m not here to call out his lies. Everybody knows he’s a liar.”