Popularity of extremist groups, such as Daesh, Muslim Brotherhood to decline: Arab News poll

(AFP)
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Updated 12 October 2020

Popularity of extremist groups, such as Daesh, Muslim Brotherhood to decline: Arab News poll

News Now Chicago reports that an Arab News poll shows that the popularity of extremist groups such as Daesh, and religious political parties, like the Muslim Brotherhood, will decline over the next 10 years.

Of the poll’s 3,079 respondents, surveyed in partnership with YouGov, 59 percent of people believed their home countries would see less of the Muslim Brotherhood in the next 10 years. With regards to Hezbollah 63 percent shared this belief, while 75 percent expected less Al Qaeda, and 57 percent expected to see less of Hamas.

The poll also found that the deaths of extremist leaders such as Osama bin Laden and Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi did nothing to foment sympathy for their respective groups.

The article’s key message is that Arabs have had enough of extremism and political-Islamic groups.

Read More - News Now Chicago


US officials: Iran sent emails intimidating American voters

Updated 53 min 19 sec ago

US officials: Iran sent emails intimidating American voters

  • “These actions are desperate attempts by desperate adversaries”: intelligence director

BOSTON: Iran is responsible for emails meant to intimidate American voters and sow unrest in multiple states, and Tehran and Moscow have also obtained voter registration with the goal of interfering in the election, US officials said at a rare news conference Tuesday night just two weeks before the vote.
John Ratcliffe, the intelligence director, and FBI Director Chris Wray said the US will impose costs on any foreign countries interfering in the 2020 US election. Despite the Iranian and Russian actions, they said Americans can be confident that their vote will be counted.
“These actions are desperate attempts by desperate adversaries,” Ractliffe said.
The news conference was held as Democratic voters in at least four battleground states, including Florida and Pennsylvania, have received threatening emails, falsely purporting to be from the far-right group Proud Boys, that warned “we will come after you” if the recipients didn’t vote for President Donald Trump.
The voter-intimidation operation apparently used email addresses obtained from state voter registration lists, which include party affiliation and home addresses and can include email addresses and phone numbers. Those addresses were then used in an apparently widespread targeted spamming operation. The senders claimed they would know which candidate the recipient was voting for in the Nov. 3 election, for which early voting is ongoing.