Egypt to host meeting between Libyan Parliament representatives and State Council

Egypt to host meeting between Libyan Parliament representatives and State Council
Egypt fully believed in working on all paths aimed at resolving the Libyan crisis. (AFP/File)
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Updated 13 October 2020

Egypt to host meeting between Libyan Parliament representatives and State Council

Egypt to host meeting between Libyan Parliament representatives and State Council
  • Over the past few years, we have brought views closer and brought about a rapprochement between all parts of the Libyan state, Kamel said

CAIRO: Two delegations from the Libyan House of Representatives and the State Council in Cairo will discuss, for three days, constitutional issues and presidential and parliamentary elections under the auspices of the UN, with the aim of resolving the Libyan crisis and the country’s new constitution.

The director of the Egyptian General Intelligence, Abbas Kamel, said at the opening of the meeting that the time had come to fulfill the Libyan people’s aspirations for stability, by pushing for a political path so that the country had a constitution that defined political powers and responsibilities, leading to presidential and parliamentary elections.

“Over the past few years, we have brought views closer and brought about a rapprochement between all parts of the Libyan state, and opened up to all parties seeking to resolve the crisis,” Kamel said.

He added that Egypt sought to preserve the unity and integrity of Libya’s territories, stressing Egypt’s adherence to the political settlement under the auspices of the UN. He explained the need for a solution without interference from any external parties.

Kamel said that the city of Hurghada recently hosted security and military track meetings between a Libyan army delegation and a delegation representing Al-Wefaq government, that paved the way for the 5+5 talks under the auspices of the UN.

The discussions were positive, and Egypt fully believed in working on all paths aimed at resolving the Libyan crisis so that its citizens could enjoy stability, he added.

During the past few days, political and security meetings on Libya were launched in Morocco, Switzerland and Egypt, which recently hosted meetings of security and military delegations representing the Government of National Accord and the General Command of the Libyan Army on Sept. 28 and 29.

The recommendations from the Hurghada talks also included taking urgent measures to exchange detainees due to military operations before the end of next October, by forming specialized committees from the concerned parties, as well as launching media campaigns to spread tolerance and reconciliation, rejecting violence and terrorism.


Lebanon investigates death of former customs official

Updated 7 min 3 sec ago

Lebanon investigates death of former customs official

Lebanon investigates death of former customs official
  • Col. Munir Abu Rjeili was found dead, in his home in Qartaba, some 40 km northeast of Beirut, from a blow to the head
  • Leading Druze politician Walid Jumblatt questioned whether there was a link with the Aug. 4 explosion at Beirut port

BEIRUT: Lebanese authorities are investigating the killing of a retired customs officer in what a leading politician described as a “terrible incident.”
Col. Munir Abu Rjeili was found dead in his home on Wednesday in Qartaba, some 40 km (25 miles) northeast of Beirut, with a blow to the head, a security source said.
Leading Druze politician Walid Jumblatt asked on Twitter on Thursday what was behind the killing. He questioned whether there was a link with the Aug. 4 explosion at Beirut port that killed about 200 people and devastated swathes of the capital.
“Is this terrible incident to obstruct any serious investigation into the case of the explosion at Beirut port?” Jumblatt wrote.
But a senior interior ministry source said: “So far, no link has been found between the port and the murder.”
Abu Rjeili’s career in Lebanese customs included leading a Beirut division that counters overland smuggling, serving at the airport and heading a division of the Higher Customs Council, according to CV sent by a relative and lawyer, Joseph Khalil.
Abu Rjeili had not been summoned for questioning in the investigation in to the Beirut blast probe and had not served at the port, the source said.
Khalil, the lawyer, said the family was waiting for the results of the investigation.
Four months since the explosion, Lebanese are still awaiting the final results of the investigation, after authorities promised a full and swift probe.
President Michel Aoun last month called for the acceleration of the investigation.
The first warning about the cargo that blew up in Beirut port came in 2014 from another late Lebanese customs officer, Col. Joseph Skaf. Skaf’s family believe his death in 2017 was murder, possibly connected to his long career as a customs officer fighting criminality and drug smuggling.