Pakistani pilot who steered first Emirates flight remembers birth of UAE airline

Pakistani pilot who steered first Emirates flight remembers birth of UAE airline
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Retired Capt. Fazal Ghani Mian speaks to Arab News in Islamabad on Oct. 28. (AN photo)
Pakistani pilot who steered first Emirates flight remembers birth of UAE airline
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An undated archive photo of Capt. Fazal Ghani Mian shows him during his service with Pakistan International Airlines. (Photo courtesy: Capt. Fazal Ghani Mian)
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Updated 31 October 2020

Pakistani pilot who steered first Emirates flight remembers birth of UAE airline

Pakistani pilot who steered first Emirates flight remembers birth of UAE airline
  • The historic flight took off from Dubai to Karachi on Oct. 25, 1985
  • Carrier’s success lies in leadership that prioritizes competence, retired captain says

ISLAMABAD: Thirty-five years after he steered the first Emirates flight, retired Capt. Fazal Ghani Mian says the success of the UAE flag carrier was and remains its competence and merit.

The first Emirates flight, EK600, took off from Dubai to Karachi on Oct. 25, 1985.

Recalling the airline’s birth and having observed its operations for more than three decades, the former chief pilot of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA), who flew the Emirates Airbus A300 on its maiden trip, says the UAE flag carrier’s success lies in leadership that prioritizes competence.

“Emirates selects people on merit and they give them responsibility with authority,” he told Arab News in an interview this week. “No outside interference in their job. I am proud that I was a part of competent people who played a role in building Emirates airline from scratch.” His involvement with Emirates was a result of PIA’s contract with Dubai to provide pilots, engineers and two aircraft to help establish the UAE airline.

 

“I came to Dubai on Oct. 1, 1985 and met Emirates Airline managing director Maurice Flanagan and their teams,” Mian said. “We discussed the tasks ahead related to the arrival of two aircraft to lay the foundation of the Emirates airline.” “We used to discuss the progress every day and prepare reports, and if there was any problem we found we used to help each other solve it.

“I am grateful to the great leadership of Sheikh Ahmed who was conducting these meetings,” he said, referring to Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al-Maktoum, the president of the Dubai Civil Aviation Authority and founder of the Emirates Group.

The two aircraft were painted in Emirates colors at a PIA hangar in Karachi, all in secrecy. They were then flown to Dubai.

“On Oct. 18, 1985 a team of engineers, along with two aircraft, arrived at Dubai airport with the Emirates insignia. The aircraft were kept in a hangar at the far corner of the airport away from the public eye,” Mian said.

On Oct. 23, 1985, the Pakistani-Emirati team had to operate five special VIP flights over Dubai.

“On Oct. 22, we received some uniforms very late at night,” the former captain said. “The laundry was closed but a young man working in the hotel took the uniforms and pressed them at his residence and brought it back around midnight.”




An undated archive photo of Capt. Fazal Ghani Mian shows him during his service with Pakistan International Airlines.  (Photo courtesy: Capt. Fazal Ghani Mian)

“I was praying that nothing bad would happen,” Mian said. “The first Airbus flight was around 11 o’clock and Sheikh Mohammed (bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, the ruler of Dubai) and other royal dignitaries were sitting on the aircraft. We flew over Dubai for 45 minutes and we were escorted by Dubai air force fighter pilots.”

Two days later the UAE flag carrier took off on its first official flight.

“On Oct. 25, we operated the first official flight to Karachi with top royal dignitaries of UAE and employees of Emirates airline on board,” Mian said.

The smooth beginning came with a dream landing.

“Landing was so smooth that nobody realized the aircraft had landed,” Mian said. “This was the beginning of Emirates.

 

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Afghans demand resumption of Pakistan flights at pre-Taliban fare

Afghans demand resumption of Pakistan flights at pre-Taliban fare
Updated 20 sec ago

Afghans demand resumption of Pakistan flights at pre-Taliban fare

Afghans demand resumption of Pakistan flights at pre-Taliban fare
  • Taliban order airline to adjust its ticket prices for Kabul-Islamabad flights
  • Travel to Pakistan crucial for many Afghans in need of lifesaving treatment that is unavailable in Afghanistan

KABUL: Afghan citizens and government officials said on Saturday they are hopeful Pakistan International Airlines would soon resume its Kabul operations at the cheaper fares it offered before the Taliban took control of Afghanistan.

PIA resumed special flights from Kabul to the Pakistani capital, Islamabad, after the Taliban seized power in mid-August, serving as a lifeline for many Afghans trying to flee the new regime and economic crisis or seek treatment in Pakistan, as they used to before.

But with most airlines no longer flying to Afghanistan, tickets for PIA flights have spiraled out of the reach of most Afghans, selling for as much as $2,500, according to travel agents in Kabul, compared with $120-$150 before the Taliban takeover.

Earlier this week, the Taliban Transportation Ministry issued a statement ordering the airline to “adjust the price of tickets for Kabul-Islamabad flights to the ticket standard set before the victory of the Islamic Emirate.” Otherwise, the ministry said, “they will not be permitted to run their operations from Kabul airport.”

Following the statement, PIA said it had suspended flights to Kabul over the “unprofessional attitude” of Taliban authorities.

“We hope PIA will understand and act according to the demand of Islamic Emirate Transport and Aviation Ministry,” Bilal Karimi, spokesman and member of the Taliban cultural commission, told Arab News on Saturday.

“What we are looking for is to provide the means to ordinary Afghans who want to go to Pakistan but who do not have the budget to do so.”

Ordinary Afghans are hopeful that flights will soon be available at affordable fares. For some, travel to Pakistan is necessary for lifesaving treatment that in many cases is unavailable in Afghanistan, where healthcare infrastructure is largely fragile and inadequate for more complex medical interventions.

Abdul Ali Hussaini arrived in Kabul last week to bring his injured brother to Pakistan for urgent surgery after a deadly Daesh attack in the northern city of Kunduz on Oct. 8.

“I brought my brother to Kabul after the attack occurred. He is in an emergency hospital. The doctors told me that for further treatment he should be transferred to Pakistan,” he told Arab News. “The suspension of flights and the high rate of tickets are a problem. We hope that flights resume and that we can buy tickets at a cheaper price.”

Ataullah, 35, arrived in Kabul from Helmand province to travel with his mother, a leukemia patient, for urgent treatment in Pakistan.

“I was asked $2,500 for each ticket,” he said. “I tried very hard to get my mother to Pakistan as soon as possible. I do not know what to do. I am hoping for a miracle.”

Mohammed Rashad from Kabul said he had received a scholarship from an Italian university but had been unable to travel due to PIA’s impossibly high flight prices.

“I have 15 days to go to Islamabad and, from there, travel to Italy,” the 26-year-old told Arab News. “I will miss this opportunity.”

Sayed, who works for a foreign agency in Afghanistan, wants to leave the country with his family and is now trying to reach Islamabad. Still, the blocking of PIA flights to Kabul has posed a serious challenge to him.

“One of the embassies operating in Islamabad has sent my family and me our visas. They asked me to come to Pakistan within a week,” he said. “The delay in my trip to Pakistan has now become a major problem for us and has multiplied my security fears here in Kabul.”

While PIA has earlier said its Afghanistan operations are “not very lucrative financially” as it faces “difficult circumstances” at Kabul airport, some Afghan experts say high demand has allowed the carrier to impose skyrocketing fares.  

“Demand for travel to Islamabad has increased,” Sayed Massoud, economics professor from Kabul University, told Arab News. “Everyone is trying to get to Islamabad as soon as possible and from there to another place. PIA is trying to monopolize flights to Islamabad to make more money.”

While PIA has not announced whether and when it is going to resume its Afghanistan flights, the airline’s representative in Kabul, Ahmad Salim Rohani, said he is hopeful it will soon return to its operations with more affordable fares.

“Once the flights resume, we hope that tickets will return to lower prices,” he said.

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Gems add extra sparkle to Pakistani artist’s rare craft

Gems add extra sparkle to Pakistani artist’s rare craft
Updated 7 min 52 sec ago

Gems add extra sparkle to Pakistani artist’s rare craft

Gems add extra sparkle to Pakistani artist’s rare craft
  • Reki’s distinctive creations have attracted much attention on social media, and several pieces have already sold

QUETTA: When Barishna Reki was thinking of ideas for her senior thesis as she completed a fine arts degree in 2019, she wanted to work on a project that would one day help to transform her passion for painting into a financially viable career.

Reki, now 25, who hails from the remote town of Mashkail in southwestern Balochistan province and graduated from Sardar Bahadur Khan Women’s University two years ago, came up with the idea of using traditional Baloch jewelry to add an extra sparkle to her canvases.

The project that she submitted as part of her coursework has now become her life’s work. Reki’s creations, which combine painting and jewelry like a sumptuous, gilded embrace in a Gustav Klimt painting, have attracted much attention on social media.

What’s more, she has sold four pieces, one of them for 175,000 rupees ($1,000) to leading Pakistani actress Zeba Bakhtiar. Another creation is on sale for 275,000 rupees at a mall in Quetta, the capital of Balochistan.

Last year, Reki also set up her own shop, Charisma Studios, which has become a space of passion and business for other women artists from Balochistan who want to make a living out of their art.

In this impoverished province — Balochistan is Pakistan’s largest province in terms of land area but its least populous and underdeveloped — this is no small achievement for a 25-year-old woman. Less than 10 percent women in the region currently own their own businesses, according to the Balochistan Women’s Business Association.

“I was creative since my childhood but I never intended to become an artist because my parents wanted me to be a doctor or an engineer,” she told Arab News.

Though Reki knew how hard the journey ahead would be and how few opportunities a career in art offered, she was not deterred.

“When I was doing my thesis, I resolved to do something different and creative for the people of Balochistan.”

Reki recently completed 15 pieces in different sizes, the largest 2.4 by 1.2 meters, using natural precious and semi-precious stones and ornamental buttons combined with watercolors and oil paints. Some pieces use old jewelry given by her mother. Others employ ornamental artificial pieces purchased from friends or local junkyards in Quetta.

“From the beginning I wanted to work on a massive scale,” Reki said. Her first mixed-media art piece was almost three meters tall and took three months to complete.

Aiman Islam, 28, a design consultant at Charisma Studio, said she saw Reki’s work on a social media website three months ago and was inspired to contact her.

“I had expertise in design consultancy and couldn’t get a proper job in Quetta, but now under Charisma Studio’s umbrella, I have been working on three projects which I hope will be beneficial for jobless artists in the province,” Islam said.

Amina Malik Mengal, 24, who trained in biochemistry, said she used to practice calligraphy at school but abandoned the idea of becoming a professional artist because of a lack of professional prospects.

“But after meeting Barishna Reki and getting to know about Charisma Studio, I am reviving my passion along with other artists,” Mengal said. “There are many versatile artists in Balochistan who are looking for assistance and appreciation.”

Muhaddisa Batool, 30, completed her graduation in fine arts in 2015 but never got an opportunity to pursue her passion. Through Charisma Studios, however, she had gotten two orders for pencil sketches, which she sold in September. “Now I am looking for more orders,” Batool said.

Reki said she was grateful and happy to be able to help struggling artists in Balochistan. In this spirit, she has published a book titled “Charismas” that she described as a self-help guide for young people in Balochistan who have lost hope due to a lack of creative opportunities.

Muhammad Asif Kasi, a painter and sculptor in Balochistan with more than 24 years’ experience, said Reki’s craft was “rare.”

“Instead of using more colors on canvas, Barishna has used jewelry, which is an exclusive idea,” Kasi said, adding that he hoped that Reki would keep pursuing her passion and inspire other women in Balochistan to do so as well.


Muslims in Southend, southeast England condemn ‘brutal’ murder of British politician

Muslims in Southend, southeast England condemn ‘brutal’ murder of British politician
Updated 16 October 2021

Muslims in Southend, southeast England condemn ‘brutal’ murder of British politician

Muslims in Southend, southeast England condemn ‘brutal’ murder of British politician
  • A statement issued by Southend mosques said that Sir David’s killing was “an indefensible atrocity”
  • The MP was praised for his “warmth, selflessness and kindness”

LONDON: The murder of MP Sir David Amess has been strongly condemned in a joint statement issued by all of Southend’s mosques as a “brutal and senseless killing.”

The statement said that Sir David’s killing was “an indefensible atrocity” committed in the name of “blind hatred, and we look forward to the perpetrator being brought to justice.”

Veteran Conservative MP David Amess, 69, was talking with constituents at a church in the small town of Leigh-on-Sea, east of London, when he was stabbed to death on Friday.

Police said they arrested a 25-year-old suspect and were investigating “a potential motivation linked to Islamist extremism.”

The fatal stabbing has “been declared as a terrorist incident, with the investigation being led by Counter Terrorism Policing,” the police said in a statement.

The MP was described as a “tremendous force for good and pillar of support for our community” by the Joint Secretary of Essex Jamme Masjid Ruhul Shamsuddin.

“This was senseless violence against a truly wonderful man. It’s an honour to say I’ve known him my whole life. I’ve lost not just a community leader, but a family friend and mentor, Shamsuddin said. 

The Imam of UKIM Southend Mosque Iftikhar Ul Haq and its president, Dr Arshad Ghori, praised Sir David for being “always reachable“ and for his “great compassion for communities.”

They added: “He will be greatly missed by us at UKIM Southend Mosque and the community in Southend. We strongly condemn this brutal murder and hope the perpetrator be swiftly brought to justice.”

The statement paid tribute to Sir David’s “warmth, selflessness and kindness,” adding that he had joined the local Muslim community as it celebrated its achievements over the years. 

“He graced us with his presence at the opening of the Essex Jamme Masjid in 2008 and 2014. He took part in the launch of Southend-on-Sea’s first Muslim Scout group,” it added.

“He shared in our happiness, by attending our weddings and functions and he was there for us in our times of need. We will all miss him dearly.”


6 combatants, 2 workers killed in fresh violence in Kashmir

6 combatants, 2 workers killed in fresh violence in Kashmir
Updated 16 October 2021

6 combatants, 2 workers killed in fresh violence in Kashmir

6 combatants, 2 workers killed in fresh violence in Kashmir
  • Police blamed militants fighting against Indian rule for the Saturday attacks in the region’s main city and a village in southern Kashmir
  • Following the spate of killings last week, authorities have detained over 1,000 people in a sweeping crackdown across the Kashmir Valley

SRINAGAR, India: Assailants fatally shot two non-local workers in two targeted attacks in Indian-controlled Kashmir on Saturday night, police said, days after five people were killed in a similar fashion in the disputed region.
The killing comes hours after police said government forces killed four suspected militants in the last 24 hours and claimed three of them were involved in last week’s killings of three members of minority communities.
Police blamed militants fighting against Indian rule for the Saturday attacks in the region’s main city and a village in southern Kashmir and called the killings “terror attacks.”
In a first incident in Srinagar, police said militants fired at a Hindu street vendor from India’s eastern state of Bihar. He died on the spot, police said.
An hour later, a Muslim worker from northern Uttar Pradesh state was shot and critically wounded in southern Litter village of Pulwama district. Police said he later died at a hospital.
Last week, assailants fatally shot three Hindus, a Sikh woman and a local Muslim taxi driver in the region in a sudden rise in violence against civilians that both pro- and anti-India Kashmiri politicians widely condemned.
Also Saturday, two militants were killed in a gunfight with government forces in southern Pampore area, police said. Another two rebels were killed in two separate gunbattles with Indian troops in Srinagar and southern Pulwama district on Friday.
Police said three among the slain rebels were involved in the killings of prominent local Hindu chemist and two schoolteachers of Hindu and Sikh faiths.
Following the spate of killings last week, authorities have detained over 1,000 people in a sweeping crackdown across the Kashmir Valley.
Meanwhile, the Indian army said the death toll in a gunfight with rebels that raged on Thursday in a forested area of southern Mendhar town climbed to four as troops Saturday recovered the bodies of two soldiers missing in action.
On Monday, five Indian soldiers were killed in the deadliest gunbattle with militants this year in contiguous forested area of Surankote town.
Lt. Col. Devender Anand, an Indian army spokesman, said troops continued with search operations in both the areas.
India and Pakistan claim the divided territory of Kashmir in its entirety.
Rebels in the Indian-controlled portion of Kashmir have been fighting New Delhi’s rule since 1989. Most Muslim Kashmiris support the rebel goal of uniting the territory, either under Pakistani rule or as an independent country.
India insists the Kashmir militancy is Pakistan-sponsored terrorism. Pakistan denies the charge, and most Kashmiris consider it a legitimate freedom struggle. Tens of thousands of civilians, rebels and government forces have been killed in the conflict.


16-year-old charged over fatal stabbing of Afghan teen in London 

16-year-old charged over fatal stabbing of Afghan teen in London 
Updated 16 October 2021

16-year-old charged over fatal stabbing of Afghan teen in London 

16-year-old charged over fatal stabbing of Afghan teen in London 

LONDON: A 16-year-old boy has been charged with murder over the fatal stabbing of an Afghan teenager in London, the Metropolitan Police said.

Hazrat Wali, 18, succumbed to his injuries in hospital on Tuesday after being stabbed that afternoon. 

He reportedly arrived in Britain two years ago as a refugee and attended London’s Richmond-upon-Thames College. 

The 16-year-old is expected to appear at Westminster Magistrates Court. The police specialist crime command are investigating the murder.