Little Amal — a giant puppet’s long walk for refugee children

Little Amal will ‘walk’ through Turkey, Greece, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Belgium and France. (Supplied)
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Updated 12 November 2020

Little Amal — a giant puppet’s long walk for refugee children

PARIS: On Tuesday 30th March next year, a 3.5-meter-high puppet called Little Amal will embark on an 8,000-kilometer journey from Gaziantep on the Turkish-Syrian border to Manchester in England, stopping at around 70 towns and cities on the way. 

This endeavor, known as “The Walk,” originated from Joe Murphy and Joe Robertson’s play “The Jungle,” based on the refugee camp in Calais, France. Following successful runs in London’s West End then Broadway, director Stephen Daldry and producer David Lan decided to focus a project on Amal, a nine-year-old refugee who was one of the play’s lead characters. The puppet, Little Amal, was created by Handspring Puppet Company in South Africa, and Amir Nizar Zuabi was appointed as artistic director of “The Walk.” 




The journey will end in the UK on July 4, 2021, where Little Amal’s arrival will mark the opening of the Manchester International Festival. (Supplied)

Little Amal will ‘walk’ through Turkey, Greece, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Belgium and France accompanied by 15 puppeteers, interacting with local communities along the way. The journey will end in the UK on July 4, 2021, where Little Amal’s arrival will mark the opening of the Manchester International Festival. 




Little Amal will be accompanied by 15 puppeteers, interacting with local communities along the way. (Supplied)

“I'm not a refugee myself. As a Palestinian, I didn't move, my country moved,” Zuabi told Arab News from Stockholm, where he is currently producing his latest play. “I inherently connect with ‘The Walk’ and have been involved since its inception, so it was easy to figure out where I wanted to take it. The artistic ambition is unique, because we're creating huge, participatory events in the cities we’re passing through. We’re not naïve — part of the appeal is that this is an endurance race meets an arts event, on a scale that is almost unheard of, almost audacious. There's something absolutely beautiful about a community coming together to welcome, celebrate or empower a vulnerable refugee, who proves much less vulnerable once you get to meet her. How we receive refugee children — the opportunities we offer them — will mean they are not refugees anymore, they can become whatever they’re encouraged to be. Who knows where the next genius or great idea is coming from? It might be from Gaza, Shatila, or one of the camps in Turkey. The community events are joyful. As someone involved in the arts, I'm a true believer in beauty. Beauty is the way divinity shows itself. Maybe, in this moment of isolation, the ability to bring people together to dream with a project of this scale is just what we need.”




This endeavor, known as “The Walk,” originated from Joe Murphy and Joe Robertson’s play “The Jungle,” based on the refugee camp in Calais, France. (Supplied)

Little Amal is a feisty role model for kids — appealing, funny and resilient. And “The Walk” focuses not on the tragic plight of refugee children, but on their untapped potential. 


Tom Hanks talks ‘News of the World’ and the comeback of Westerns

Tom Hanks stars in ‘News of the World.’ (File/AFP)
Updated 29 November 2020

Tom Hanks talks ‘News of the World’ and the comeback of Westerns

LOS ANGELES: Depending on who you ask, Westerns are either on their way out, gone for good, or making a slow comeback in Hollywood. At one point a staple genre of the film industry, the classic Western rarely makes it onto the movie theater marquee these days. Big-budget flops such as 2013’s “The Lone Ranger” have served to usher the genre out of popularity, but critical successes such as Quinten Tarantino’s “Django Unchained,” “The Hateful 8” and the Coen Brothers’ “True Grit” are doing their part to keep Westerns from dying off completely. 

On Christmas Day, “News of the World” will be doing its part to keep the Western genre alive, and hopefully bag Universal Pictures a few Oscar nominations. Arab News heard more from the film’s star Tom Hanks.

“I love listening to a great story as much as I like telling one, and that’s why I was so excited about playing Kidd,” Hanks said, giving audiences a taste of what his performance has in store. “He is a storyteller. He is driven, emotional. He is noble. He is moved by a pursuit of the truth.”

Hanks plays Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd, a former army officer who, after the death of his family, makes his living traveling around Texas reading the news to illiterate townsfolk and entertaining with true tales from across the world.

“'News of the World' takes place in the shadow of the Civil War’s end. There is defeat. There is strife and anger. Because of the war, Kidd came back to having nothing left,” he told us. “Reading the news gave him a purpose. He got up. He collected the stories. He delivered a reading and then he moved onto the next town.”

 As he continues in his travels, Kidd comes across Johanna, a young girl who had been taken from her pioneer family and raised by the Kiowa Native Americans. 

“She has no idea who her family is,” Hanks shared. “Burdened by his own decency, Kidd is going to have to return her to her family and this coming from a man who has lost any semblance of what a family is.”

The movie is adapted from the novel of the same name by author Paulette Jiles, and while it is not based on a true story, its main characters are inspired by real people. Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd is based on the ancestor of a friend of Jiles’ — the similarly named historical figure Captain Adolphus Caesar Kydd — who performed readings of newspapers in the 1870s. Johanna is inspired by the more well-known historical tale of Cynthia Ann Parker, who was kidnapped and raised by the Comanche Native Americans.

Interestingly, there seems to be a disagreement between Jiles and film director Paul Greengrass about their goals in portraying the story of “News of the World.” In a 2016 interview with Texas Monthly, Jiles stated that she had no intention of making a commentary on contemporary politics with the original book, preferring to “move people into the world of imagination.”

Greengrass, on the other hand, told reporters at Vanity Fair that he saw the film, which features families and communities in conflict with each other, as representative of the societal divide in the modern-day US. With these opposing ideas woven into the fabric of the story, it will be interesting to see what audiences take away after watching.

It is clear what Universal is hoping to take away, and that is an Oscar. “News of the World” sees Hanks and Greengrass working together again after their previous collaboration, 2013’s “Captain Phillips.” While not an Oscar-winner, “Captain Phillips” received six nominations as well as attention at the Golden Globes and other award shows. With the film releasing at the tail end of the Oscar season, and a road-tested team of director and star, “News of the World” could be Universal’s best shot at an award for the 2020 film year.

Between award season dreams and the hopeful continuation of the Western genre, there is a lot riding on “News of the World.” At its core, however, the movie promises A-list performances and a compelling story full of action and heart.

“Kidd goes through something that saves him as much as he saves Johanna. She gave him a true purpose,” Hanks told us. “His real message is ‘when you have love in your life you will be alright.’ That’s what all great stories are. It’s just pure love for another human being.”