Police fire tear gas at Paris protest against police violence

Police fire tear gas at Paris protest against police violence
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A demonstrator throws a flare during a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. (AP)
Police fire tear gas at Paris protest against police violence
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Riot police officer take position during a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. (AP)
Police fire tear gas at Paris protest against police violence
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A youth gestures next to a burning barricade during a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. (AP)
Police fire tear gas at Paris protest against police violence
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Youths use construction fences, one ornated with a portrait of late Argentinian soccer legend Diego Maradona, during a demonstration against a security law that would restrict sharing images of police, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020 in Paris. (AP)
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Updated 28 November 2020

Police fire tear gas at Paris protest against police violence

Police fire tear gas at Paris protest against police violence
  • The majority of the thousands of protesters marched peacefully, but several small groups clashed with police
  • The protests follow the publication this week of CCTV footage of the minutes-long beating of Black music producer Michel Zecler by three police officers in Paris

PARIS: Police fired tear gas and stun grenades during a protest march against police violence in Paris on Saturday after masked protesters launched fireworks at their lines, put up barricades and threw stones.
The majority of the thousands of protesters marched peacefully, but several small groups clashed with police. Two cars, a motorcycle and building materials were set on fire, which generated clouds of black smoke visible from miles away.
Thousands of people also marched in Lille, Rennes, Strasbourg and other cities.
The protests follow the publication this week of CCTV footage of the minutes-long beating of Black music producer Michel Zecler by three police officers in Paris on Nov. 21.
The incident has also fanned anger about a draft law that is seen as curbing the right of journalists to report on police brutality.
The bill would make it a crime to circulate images of police officers in certain circumstances, which opponents say would limit press freedom.
Many protesters carried placards with slogans like “Who will protect us from the police,” “Stop police violence” and “Democracy bludgeoned.”
The images of Zecler being beaten have circulated widely on social media and in the French and foreign press. President Emmanuel Macron said on Friday the images were shameful for France.
Four police officers are being held for questioning as part of an investigation into the beating.
“What is happening in Paris is extremely worrying and we cannot let this pass. I have spent two years with the yellow vests and I have seen all the violence,” demonstrator Caroline Schatz told Reuters at the Paris march.
The journalists’ organizations and civil liberty groups who organized the marches were joined by far-left militants, environmental activists and yellow vest protesters. The yellow vests have been protesting against government policies for two years.


Kremlin says would welcome Biden’s efforts to extend New START arms control treaty

Kremlin says would welcome Biden’s efforts to extend New START arms control treaty
Updated 20 January 2021

Kremlin says would welcome Biden’s efforts to extend New START arms control treaty

Kremlin says would welcome Biden’s efforts to extend New START arms control treaty
  • The New START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) accord limits the numbers of strategic nuclear warheads
  • A failure to extend New START could fuel a potential arms race and tensions between Moscow and Washington

MOSCOW: The Kremlin said on Wednesday it remained committed to extending the New START nuclear arms control treaty with the United States and would welcome efforts promised by the administration of US President-elect Joe Biden to reach agreement.
The New START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) accord, which was signed in 2010 and expires in February, limits the numbers of strategic nuclear warheads, missiles and bombers that Russia and the United States can deploy.
“Russia and its president are in favor of preserving this agreement,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on a conference call. “If our American colleagues will in fact demonstrate a political will to preserve this pact by extending it, this can only be welcomed.”
Biden’s choice for secretary of state, Antony Blinken, said on Tuesday that the incoming US administration would seek to extend the pact and decide how long an extension to pursue.
Russian President Vladimir Putin last year called on Washington to extend the last major nuclear arms pact between the two countries for a year without any conditions.
A failure to extend New START could fuel a potential arms race and tensions between Moscow and Washington.