Saudi pavilion at Dubai Expo hosts charity art auction in Riyadh

Saudi pavilion at Dubai Expo hosts charity art auction in Riyadh
Works by artist Nugamshi are on show at the Lakum Artspace in Riyadh until Dec. 24. (Supplied)
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Updated 23 December 2020

Saudi pavilion at Dubai Expo hosts charity art auction in Riyadh

Saudi pavilion at Dubai Expo hosts charity art auction in Riyadh

RIYADH: A virtual charity auction featuring calligraphic art inspired by the Saudi 90th National Day is being hosted in Riyadh by the Kingdom’s pavilion at Expo Dubai.

All proceeds from the sale will be donated to the Saudi Society of Autism Families charity and eight pieces by Saudi-born artist Nugamshi can be viewed at the Lakum Artspace exhibit in Riyadh until Dec. 24.

A spokesperson for the expo’s Saudi pavilion told Arab News: “The event highlights incredible Saudi talents and showcases the country’s leading artistic and cultural personalities as well as its enduring tradition of calligraphy.”




Nugamshi based his art on the colors and words of the Saudi national anthem. (Supplied)

Nugamshi based his art on the colors and words of the Saudi national anthem and used a broom, paint, and putty material to create depictions of words such as sky, glory, pride, my country, and king.

He said: “There are layers to calligraphy, there is a concept, movement, and the actual word and its meaning. There is no right, there is no wrong, it is all movement.”

The artist videos all of his creations and added: “You won’t fully understand the art until you see the movement that goes behind it.”




Nugamshi used a broom, paint, and putty material to create depictions of words such as sky, glory, pride, my country, and king. (Supplied)

Alongside the artwork, a specially commissioned video to mark the country’s 90th National Day shows Saudi opera singer Sawsan Al-Bahiti performing a rendition of the Kingdom’s national anthem as Nugamshi creates his pieces.

“The film depicts the collaborative rendition by a calligraphist and singer of the country’s national anthem in their own unique styles. We selected Nugamshi as the Saudi artist in the video for his unique contemporary style that also remains true to tradition,” the pavilion spokesperson said.

“The Society of Autism Families was a perfect fit as the beneficiary of an event that celebrates the aspirations and milestones of our country.”

Arabic calligraphy: Ancient craft, modern art
For the Saudi Ministry of Culture's Year of Arabic Calligraphy in 2020/21, we take an in-depth look at how the craft has developed from ancient to modern times.

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‘Star Trek: Lower Decks’ explores strange new worlds to great effect

‘Star Trek: Lower Decks’ is now streaming on Amazon Prime Video. Supplied
‘Star Trek: Lower Decks’ is now streaming on Amazon Prime Video. Supplied
Updated 7 min 41 sec ago

‘Star Trek: Lower Decks’ explores strange new worlds to great effect

‘Star Trek: Lower Decks’ is now streaming on Amazon Prime Video. Supplied

LONDON: Ever wondered what happens in the hallways of Starfleet’s high-tech spaceships while Captain Kirk et al are off saving the galaxy? Curious about what the 99 percent of the crew who are usually off screen get up to? Well, wonder no longer. Originally created for CBS All Access, new animated series “Star Trek: Lower Decks” has launched internationally on Amazon Prime Video, offering a glimpse into a hitherto unexplored corner of the long-running show’s universe. While recent “Star Trek” shows have taken the franchise in a more adult direction (the excellent “Discovery” and “Picard” have included the first F-bombs in Trek history), “Lower Decks” takes a decidedly more comic approach.

Ensigns Mariner, Boimler, Tendi and Rutherford serve aboard the USS Cerritos — but the closest the quartet get to the action is when they share a turbolift with one of the senior staff. While the captain and her officers get the lion’s share of the important missions, Boimler (voiced by Dennis Quaid of “The Boys” fame) and Mariner (“Space Force” star Tawny Newsome) usually wind up delivering supplies, cleaning spilled coffee, or dealing with the administrative side of meeting new alien species. It’s a clever riff on the tried-and-tested “Star Trek” format — though readers of John Scalzi’s “Redshirts” will recognize the premise at least — and there is some fun to be had by gently mocking many of the series’ tropes.

As far as adult animation goes, “Lower Decks” is far from breaking new ground. The short, sharp episode arcs are easy to follow, and boast more than a few genuine laughs (and no shortage of Trek easter eggs), but the humor is on the safe side of risqué, and the visual style feels safe and familiar. For the “Star Trek” universe, however, the kind of self-awareness that comes from mocking its own source material represents a welcome surprise. In true “Star Trek” spirit, “Lower Decks” is seeking to explore strange new worlds.