Pakistan appoints new finance minister in latest cabinet shake-up

Pakistan appoints new finance minister in latest cabinet shake-up
Shaukat Tarin had held the finance minister portfolio in a previous government. . (File/AFP)
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Updated 16 April 2021

Pakistan appoints new finance minister in latest cabinet shake-up

Pakistan appoints new finance minister in latest cabinet shake-up
  • Hammad Azhar, who was made finance minister less than a month ago, has now been replaced by Shaukat Tarin
  • Pakistan is currently working on national budget and on implementing economic reforms suggested by the IMF

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan appointed a new finance minister on Friday, replacing Hammad Azhar, who received the portfolio less than a month ago.

Shaukat Tarin, the new appointee, is a banker who also served at the same position from 2009 to 2010 under the Pakistan Peoples Party administration of former prime minister Yousaf Raza Gilani.

The news was announced by the newly appointed information minister Chaudhry Fawad Hussain who shared the notification of the recent cabinet reshuffle in a Twitter post:

“Prime Minister Imran Khan has made changes in the cabinet, the details of these changes are attached.”

 

 

Azhar will now look after the Energy Ministry. He was given the additional portfolio of finance and revenue after Abdul Hafeez Shaikh was recently asked to step down last month over what the government described as rising inflation.

The change to the finance ministry comes at a time when the government is working on the annual budget which is likely to be presented in June. Pakistan's economic managers are also implementing structural reforms suggested by the International Monetary Fund to the country's economy.

Apart from the two cabinet changes, the prime minister also took the Economic Affairs Ministry from Makhdoom Khusro Bukhtiar and gave him the Ministry of Industries and Production.

Omar Ayub, who was previously supervising the Power and Petroleum Divisions, has now been tasked to take care of the Economic Affairs Ministry.

Senator Shibli Faraz has also been assigned the Ministry of Science and Technology which fell vacant when Chaudhry Fawad Hussain was appointed as federal minister for information and broadcasting.

“As info minister my task is to change misperceptions about Pak[istan] and highlight the vibrant effort of the Government,” Hussain wrote on Twitter.

 

 


Europeans set two-week deadline to review untenable situation in Mali

France's European and Foreign Affairs Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian leaves the weekly cabinet meeting at The Elysee Presidential Palace in Paris on January 26, 2022. (AFP)
France's European and Foreign Affairs Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian leaves the weekly cabinet meeting at The Elysee Presidential Palace in Paris on January 26, 2022. (AFP)
Updated 6 sec ago

Europeans set two-week deadline to review untenable situation in Mali

France's European and Foreign Affairs Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian leaves the weekly cabinet meeting at The Elysee Presidential Palace in Paris on January 26, 2022. (AFP)
  • European, French and international forces are seeing measures that are restricting them

PARIS: European allies have agreed to draw up plans within two weeks for how to continue their fight against militants in Mali, Denmark’s defense minister said, after France said the situation with the Malian junta had become untenable.
Tensions have escalated between Mali and its international partners after the junta failed to organize an election following two military coups.
It has also deployed Russian private military contractors, which some European countries have said is incompatible
with their mission.
“There was a clear perception, that this is not about Denmark, it’s about a Malian military junta, which wants to stay in power. They have no interest in a democratic election, which is what we have demanded,” Defense Minister Trine Bramse said after a virtual meeting between the 15 countries involved in the European special forces Takuba task mission.
She said the parties had agreed to come up with a plan within 14 days to decide on what the “future counterterrorism mission should look like in the Sahel region.”
The ministers held crisis talks after the junta insisted on an immediate withdrawal of Danish forces despite the 15 nations rejecting its claims that Copenhagen’s presence was illegal.

Given the situation, given the rupture in the political and military frameworks we cannot continue like this.

Jean-Yves Le Drian, France’s foreign minister

“European, French and international forces are seeing measures that are restricting them. Given the situation, given the rupture in the political and military frameworks we cannot continue like this,” France’s Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told RTL radio earlier in the day.
The junta’s handling of Denmark is likely to impact future deployments, with Norway, Hungary, Portugal, Romania and Lithuania due to send troops this year.
It raises questions about the broader future of French operations in Mali, where there are some 4,000 troops. Paris had staked a great deal on bringing European states to the region.
Col. Arnaud Mettey, commander of France’s forces in Ivory Coast, which backs up Sahel operations, said that the junta had no right to refuse Denmark’s presence given agreed treaties.
“Either they are rejecting this treaty and so put into question our presence or they apply it,” he said.
“France and the European Union will not disengage from the Sahel. Takuba will carry on.”
However, Denis Tull, senior associate at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs, said Paris may ultimately not be left with a choice.
“This is of course contravening the plan that France conceived. Ultimately the question will be whether France is able and willing to stay under any circumstances,” he said.
“If this confrontation continues, there probably will simply be no political context in which the French transformation agenda for (France’s counterterrorism force) Barkhane can be applied and implemented as planned.”


Landmark modern slavery case could open route back to Britain for young Daesh recruits

The collapse of a terrorism trial involving a 16-year-old-girl could have widespread ramifications for Daesh recruits from the UK such as Shamima Begum, pictured. (Screenshot/ITV News)
The collapse of a terrorism trial involving a 16-year-old-girl could have widespread ramifications for Daesh recruits from the UK such as Shamima Begum, pictured. (Screenshot/ITV News)
Updated 28 January 2022

Landmark modern slavery case could open route back to Britain for young Daesh recruits

The collapse of a terrorism trial involving a 16-year-old-girl could have widespread ramifications for Daesh recruits from the UK such as Shamima Begum, pictured. (Screenshot/ITV News)
  • A 16-year-old girl successfully challenged terror charges by arguing she had been sexually exploited online
  • Daesh recruits such as Shamima Begum say they were groomed online before traveling to Syria as teenagers

LONDON: The collapse of a terrorism trial involving a 16-year-old-girl could help to revive Daesh recruit Shamima Begum’s own legal battle to be allowed to return to the UK.

The case against the teenage terror suspect, who is the youngest girl ever charged with terrorism in the UK and cannot be named for legal reasons, was dropped this month after she successfully argued she was a victim of modern slavery. It is the first time a terrorism prosecution in the UK has been halted due to a claim of sexual exploitation.

The decision could open the door for teenage Daesh recruits, such as Begum, to go free on the basis that they were groomed online, said Jonathan Hall QC, the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation.

“Being both a victim of modern slavery and presenting a risk to the general public are not incompatible,” he said. “If fewer criminal cases are going to be possible, this begs the question whether there are sufficient non-criminal justice measures in place, in particular to deal with the terrorist risk presented by children.”

The unnamed teenager, from Derbyshire, was found to be in possession of a bomb-making video and instructions for assembling a gun, after her mother alerted authorities about the girl’s “fixation” with Adolf Hitler.

She was charged with terror offenses but the case was dropped when the Home Office decided she was a victim of modern slavery after her lawyers argued she had been sexually exploited and groomed online by a US extremist.

That case could have widespread ramifications for Daesh recruits from the UK such as Begum. She traveled to Syria to join the terrorist group in 2015, when she was 15, and has for several years been fighting a legal battle to be allowed to return to the UK from the Kurdish-administered camp in northern Syria where she has been living since she was captured.

Before she went to Syria she had been in contact with Daesh members online. She married and gave birth to three children after arriving in the country, all of whom died.

Her citizenship was revoke by the British government on the grounds of national security. This prevented her from returning to the UK, where she had lived her entire life before going to Syria.

Referring to the dropping of the case against the 16-year-old this month, Begum’s lawyer said: “Shamima has been arguing this from the beginning. This just strengthens her case.”


Philippines reopening to vaccinated foreigners next month

A resident receives a BioNtech Pfizer Covid-19 jab as a booster, at a vaccination center in Quezon city on January 27, 2022, amidst rising covid-19 infections in the capital driven by Omicron variant. (AFP)
A resident receives a BioNtech Pfizer Covid-19 jab as a booster, at a vaccination center in Quezon city on January 27, 2022, amidst rising covid-19 infections in the capital driven by Omicron variant. (AFP)
Updated 28 January 2022

Philippines reopening to vaccinated foreigners next month

A resident receives a BioNtech Pfizer Covid-19 jab as a booster, at a vaccination center in Quezon city on January 27, 2022, amidst rising covid-19 infections in the capital driven by Omicron variant. (AFP)
  • Southeast Asian country had planned to reopen in December but suspended the decision over omicron fears
  • Government is also lifting mandatory quarantine for both returning Filipinos and foreign visitors

MANILA: The Philippines will start accepting fully vaccinated travelers from Feb. 10, the government announced on Friday, after closing its borders for nearly two years to contain the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

The Southeast Asian country had planned to reopen in December, but the decision was halted due to concerns over an outbreak of the new omicron variant of COVID-19.

Presidential Spokesperson Karlo Nograles told reporters the government will suspend its risk classification list for countries starting Feb. 1, and vaccinated travelers from all 157 countries that have visa-free entry to the Philippines will be allowed entry.

“By Feb. 10, we will allow entry of fully vaccinated foreign nationals for business and tourism purposes as long as they come from countries belonging to the list as provided under Executive Order 408 or non-visa required countries,” Nograles said.

The government is also lifting its mandatory quarantine requirements for both returning Filipinos and foreign visitors as long as they are fully vaccinated and test negative for COVID-19.

Officials are hopeful that the reopening will help boost the recovery of the Philippine tourism industry and economy. “[This] will contribute significantly to job restoration, primarily in tourism-dependent communities and in the reopening of businesses that have earlier shut down during the pandemic,” Tourism Secretary Berna Romulo-Puyat said in a statement.

The Philippines follows in the footsteps of other countries in the region. Thailand will also resume its quarantine-free travel for vaccinated visitors in February, while Singapore and Malaysia have relaxed the border between their countries since November.

“We are confident that we will be able to keep pace with our ASEAN neighbors who have already made similar strides to reopen to foreign tourists,” Puyat added.

Home to white sand beaches, famous diving spots, lively entertainment, diverse cultural heritage and wildlife, the Philippine economy is dependent on tourism, which in 2019, generated 2.51 trillion pesos (about $50 billion), contributing nearly 13 percent to the country’s gross domestic product, according to Philippine Statistics Authority data.

As the pandemic hit the country in March 2020, most tourism destinations were forced to shut down, dealing a major blow to the sector as its revenues plummeted to 973 billion pesos, with foreign tourist arrivals slumping 82 percent and local travel almost 78 percent.

 


Japan’s Hayashi strongly condemns Houthis, pledges cooperation with UAE

Japan’s foreign minister Hayashi Yoshimasa. (Supplied)
Japan’s foreign minister Hayashi Yoshimasa. (Supplied)
Updated 28 January 2022

Japan’s Hayashi strongly condemns Houthis, pledges cooperation with UAE

Japan’s foreign minister Hayashi Yoshimasa. (Supplied)
  • Foreign minister Hayashi Yoshimasa expressed his condolences to those who lost their lives and their bereaved families

TOKYO: Japan’s foreign minister Hayashi Yoshimasa, in a telephone talk on Friday Jan. 28 with Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, minister of foreign affairs and international cooperation of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), strongly condemned the series of recent attacks against Abu Dhabi which were claimed by the Houthis.

With regards to the Houthis’ attacks on January 17 which resulted in casualties, minister Hayashi expressed his condolences to those who lost their lives and their bereaved families, and prayed for the swift recovery of those who were injured in the incident, the foreign ministry in Tokyo said on Friday evening.

During the talks, minister Hayashi expressed Japan’s commitment to continue to actively contribute to the stability of the Middle East region in coordination with the UAE and other countries concerned.

The two ministers confirmed that they will continue to further promote their bilateral cooperation in various fields, as 2022 marks the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Japan and the UAE.

* This article originally appeared on arabnews.jp. Read it here.


Le Pen’s campaign hit by niece calling rival far-right Zemmour a better candidate

Le Pen’s campaign hit by niece calling rival far-right Zemmour a better candidate
Updated 28 January 2022

Le Pen’s campaign hit by niece calling rival far-right Zemmour a better candidate

Le Pen’s campaign hit by niece calling rival far-right Zemmour a better candidate
  • Marechal told Le Parisien and Le Figaro in separate interviews that she considers her aunt's far-right rival Zemmour had adopted a better strategy
  • "Unlike Marine Le Pen, Zemmour still has ample room to rise further (in polls)," Marechal told Le Figaro newspaper

PARIS: Marine Le Pen’s niece Marion Marechal, a popular figure among far-right French voters, on Friday said Eric Zemmour was a better presidential candidate, piling woes onto a campaign already troubled by the defection of two EU lawmakers.
Le Pen ranks second or third in opinion polls that show a tussle among right and far-right candidates to win a second-round runoff spot against President Emmanuel Macron in the April elections. Macron himself is leading polls and seen as likely to secure the other spot.
Marechal, a 32-year old former lawmaker, told Le Parisien and Le Figaro in separate interviews that she considers her aunt’s far-right rival Zemmour had adopted a better strategy, even though he is currently running fourth in opinion polls.
“Unlike Marine Le Pen, Zemmour still has ample room to rise further (in polls),” Marechal told Le Figaro newspaper.
She said that because he was new to politics and was seeking to bridge gaps between parties, Zemmour was better placed to get wide-ranging support than Le Pen’s party, which other parties, including on the mainstream right, often shun.
Her comments went to the heart of a debate that could re-define France’s right and far-right for years to come.
Marechal, once a rising star in the Le Pen family’s National Rally party, quit politics five years ago.
She said on Friday she wanted to return but hadn’t quite decided yet whether to rally with Zemmour’s campaign for fear it would revive feuds that had torn the Le Pen family and the party apart for years.
But the divisions she said she wanted to avoid creating were immediately clear with her aunt’s reaction.
“It’s brutal, it’s violent, it’s tough for me,” a visibly moved Le Pen told CNews, adding it was “painful” on a person level and “incomprehensible” politically.
The 53-year-old veteran politician noted that polls showed her and not Zemmour as likely to reach the second round in April, in a repeat of the 2017 match that Macron won.
While the National Front — rebranded National Rally — has dominated the French far-right for decades, first led by Le Pen’s father Jean-Marie and then by her since 2011, it has always failed to reach power beyond a few municipalities.