What We Are Reading Today: The Selected Letters of Nikos Kazantzakis

What We Are Reading Today: The Selected Letters of Nikos Kazantzakis
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Updated 13 June 2021

What We Are Reading Today: The Selected Letters of Nikos Kazantzakis

What We Are Reading Today: The Selected Letters of Nikos Kazantzakis

Author: Edited and translated by Peter Bien

The life of Nikos Kazantzakis — the author of Zorba the Greek and The Last Temptation of Christ — was as colorful and eventful as his fiction.
And nowhere is his life revealed more fully or surprisingly than in his letters. Edited and translated by Kazantzakis scholar Peter Bien, this is the most comprehensive selection of Kazantzakis’s letters in any language.
One of the most important Greek writers of the 20th century, Kazantzakis (1883–1957) participated in or witnessed some of the most extraordinary events of his times, including both world wars and the Spanish and Greek civil wars.
As a foreign correspondent, an official in several Greek governments, and a political and artistic exile, he led a relentlessly nomadic existence, living in France, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Germany, Italy, Spain, the Soviet Union, and England.

He visited the Versailles Peace Conference, attended the 10th-anniversary celebration of the Bolshevik Revolution, interviewed Mussolini and Franco, and briefly served as a Greek Cabinet minister — all the while producing a stream of novels, poems, plays, travel writing, autobiography, and translations.


What We Are Reading Today: Music by the Numbers; From Pythagoras to Schoenberg

What We Are Reading Today: Music by the Numbers; From Pythagoras to Schoenberg
Updated 04 August 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Music by the Numbers; From Pythagoras to Schoenberg

What We Are Reading Today: Music by the Numbers; From Pythagoras to Schoenberg

Author: Eli Maor

Music is filled with mathematical elements. The works of Bach are often said to possess a math-like logic, and Arnold Schoenberg, Iannis Xenakis, and Karlheinz Stockhausen wrote music explicitly based on mathematical principles. 

Yet Eli Maor argues that it is music that has had the greater influence on mathematics, not the other way around. Starting with Pythagoras, proceeding through Schoenberg, and bringing the story up to the present with contemporary string theory, Music by the Numbers tells a fascinating story of composers, scientists, inventors, and eccentrics who have played a role in the age-old relationship between music, mathematics, and the physical sciences. 

Weaving compelling stories of historical episodes with Maor’s personal reflections as a mathematician and lover of classical music, this book will delight anyone who loves math and music.


What We Are Reading Today: Moon, Sun, and Witches by Irene Marsha Silverblatt

What We Are Reading Today: Moon, Sun, and Witches by Irene Marsha Silverblatt
Updated 03 August 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Moon, Sun, and Witches by Irene Marsha Silverblatt

What We Are Reading Today: Moon, Sun, and Witches by Irene Marsha Silverblatt

When the Spanish arrived in Peru in 1532, men of the Inca Empire worshipped the Sun as Father and their dead kings as ancestor heroes, while women venerated the Moon and her daughters, the Inca queens, as founders of female dynasties. 

In the pre-Inca period such notions of parallel descent were expressions of complementarity between men and women. Examining the interplay between gender ideologies and political hierarchy, Irene Silverblatt shows how Inca rulers used their Sun and Moon traditions as methods of controlling women and the Andean peoples the Incas conquered. She then explores the process by which the Spaniards employed European male and female imageries to establish their own rule in Peru and to make new inroads on the power of native women, particularly poor peasant women.

Harassed economically and abused sexually, Andean women fought back, earning in the process the Spaniards’ condemnation as “witches.” Fresh from the European witch hunts that damned women for susceptibility to heresy and diabolic influence, Spanish clerics were predisposed to charge politically disruptive poor women with witchcraft. 

Silverblatt shows that these very accusations provided women with an ideology of rebellion and a method for defending their culture


What We Are Reading Today: Putting it together

What We Are Reading Today: Putting it together
Updated 02 August 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Putting it together

What We Are Reading Today: Putting it together

Edited by James Lapine, Stephen Sondheim

Putting It Together chronicles the two-year odyssey of creating the iconic Broadway musical Sunday in the Park with George. 

This is a “really insightful look at a classic show,” said a review on goodreads.com. 

In 1982, James Lapine, at the beginning of his career as a playwright and director, met Stephen Sondheim, 19 years his senior and already a legendary Broadway composer and lyricist. 

Shortly thereafter, the two decided to write a musical inspired by Georges Seurat’s 19th-century painting A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte. 

Through conversations between Lapine and Sondheim, as well as most of the production team, and with a treasure trove of personal photographs, sketches, script notes, and sheet music, the two Broadway icons lift the curtain on their beloved musical. 

Putting It Together is a deeply personal remembrance of their collaboration and friendship and the highs and lows of that journey, one that resulted in the beloved Pulitzer Prize–winning classic. 

Lapine “is an incisive and at times self-deprecating interviewer, conceding that his unfamiliarity with musical theater and direction could sometimes lead him astray,” said the review.


What We Are Reading Today: Metrics at Work by Angele Christin

What We Are Reading Today: Metrics at Work by Angele Christin
Updated 01 August 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Metrics at Work by Angele Christin

What We Are Reading Today: Metrics at Work by Angele Christin

When the news moved online, journalists suddenly learned what their audiences actually liked, through algorithmic technologies that scrutinize web traffic and activity. Has this advent of audience metrics changed journalists’ work practices and professional identities?

In Metrics at Work, Angèle Christin documents the ways that journalists grapple with audience data in the form of clicks, and analyzes how new forms of clickbait journalism travel across national borders.

Drawing on four years of fieldwork in web newsrooms in the US and France, including more than one hundred interviews with journalists, Christin reveals many similarities among the media groups examined— their editorial goals, technological tools, and even office furniture.

Yet she uncovers crucial and paradoxical differences in how American and French journalists understand audience analytics and how these affect the news produced in each country.

American journalists routinely disregard traffic numbers and primarily rely on the opinion of their peers to define journalistic quality.

Meanwhile, French journalists fixate on Internet traffic and view these numbers as a sign of their resonance in the public sphere.


What We Are Reading Today: Shock to the System

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Updated 31 July 2021

What We Are Reading Today: Shock to the System

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Author: Michael K. Miller

How do democracies emerge? Shock to the System presents a novel theory of democratization that focuses on how events like coups, wars, and elections disrupt autocratic regimes and trigger democratic change. Employing the broadest qualitative and quantitative analyses of democratization to date, Michael Miller demonstrates that more than nine in 10 transitions since 1800 occur in one of two ways: Countries democratize following a major violent shock or an established ruling party democratizes through elections and regains power within democracy.
This framework fundamentally reorients theories on democratization by showing that violent upheavals and the preservation of autocrats in power—events typically viewed as antithetical to democracy—are in fact central to its foundation.
Through in-depth examinations of 139 democratic transitions, Miller shows how democratization frequently follows both domestic shocks (coups, civil wars, and assassinations) and international shocks (defeat in war and withdrawal of an autocratic hegemon) due to autocratic insecurity and openings for opposition actors. He also shows how transitions guided by ruling parties spring from their electoral confidence in democracy.