Operation to separate Yemeni child from parasitic twin in Saudi Arabia declared a success

Operation to separate Yemeni child from parasitic twin in Saudi Arabia declared a success
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Aisha is led away from the operating theatre after her successful procedure. (SPA)
Operation to separate Yemeni child from parasitic twin in Saudi Arabia declared a success
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The Saudi medical team that separated Aisha from her parasitic twin in Riyadh poses for a photo after carrying out the successful operation on July 29, 2021. (AN photo)
Yemeni parasitic twins Aisha Ahmed. (SPA)
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Yemeni parasitic twins Aisha Ahmed. (SPA)
Operation to separate Yemeni child from parasitic twin in Saudi Arabia declared a success
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Aisha's father thanks hanks Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah for leading the Saudi team that successfully separated her from her parasitic twin. (SPA)
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Updated 29 July 2021

Operation to separate Yemeni child from parasitic twin in Saudi Arabia declared a success

Operation to separate Yemeni child from parasitic twin in Saudi Arabia declared a success
  • The surgical procedure took seven hours and 35 minutes
  • This is the fiftieth procedure to separate conjoined twins to have taken place in the Kingdom

RIYADH: Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, the general supervisor of the King Salman Center for Relief and Humanitarian Aid (KSrelief), announced on Thursday evening that separation surgery to remove a parasitic twin from a Yemeni girl had been successful. 

The parents met their daughter, Aisha, for the first time after the operation, a moment that left both overwhelmed. 

“The surgery went very well, smoothly,” Al-Rabeeah told Arab News. “The coordination between the team was excellent.”

The operation was 45 minutes shorter than the expected time, Al-Rabeeah said, having been expected to last a gruelling nine hours and eight stages, and the baby awoke soon after the end of the procedure. 

Al-Rabeeah congratulated the parents and wished them a happy return to Yemen with their healthy child following her recovery. 

“She is opening her eyes,” he said. “She even interacted with her mother, just at the exit of the operating room, which is a breakthrough for us.”

The team was also able to remove the artificial respirator and the tubes from her airway, representing another breakthrough for the Saudi medical team.

This is the 50th twins separation procedure performed in the Kingdom since the establishment of the Saudi Conjoined Twins Program in 1990.

“We are happy, we are celebrating the 50th success, and we will continue to help those who are in need,” Al-Rabeeah added. 

The separation surgery began on Thursday morning at the King Abdullah Specialty Children’s Hospital in King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh. A team of 25 professionals, including doctors, technicians and nurses, took part in the procedure.

 

The hospital’s chairman of pediatric surgery, Dr. Mohammad Al-Namshan, said that although the baby faced some challenges during the surgery she was strong enough to overcome them. 

“With the experience of the team in previous cases we came over it professionally, and hopefully Aisha will have a very normal and good life in the future with minor effect from this surgery,” Al-Namshan told Arab News. 

Al-Rabeeah, said prior to the surgery, the procedure had a success rate of over 80 percent.

“There were challenges indeed. There is also a need for a plastic surgery intervention to cover the raw area, however, the experience of the medical team over three decades will overcome these challenges.”

 

He explained parasitic twins were a specific type of conjoined twins; Aisha is fully developed but was born with an extended pelvis area and an extra pair of lower extremities.

“I hope that Aisha remains strong and God provides her with strength and health,” Aisha’s mother Fatimah Aqeel told Arab News. “We thank King Salman, the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman and Dr. Al-Rabeeah and his team for their efforts.”

Her father Ahmad Mohimoud  said: “We have no fears, Dr. Al-Rabeeah reassured us that it is not a life-threatening procedure. We were happy to arrive in the Kingdom, and we are optimistic about this surgery, and our happiness will be fulfilled once Aisha leaves the operation room safely.”

Aisha’s parents followed the procedure through a live stream from the hospital’s conference hall. They also received news on their daughter’s situation throughout the operation. 

Al-Rabeeah said that each case is unique and examined separately.

“After the operation, Aisha’s situation will be monitored for a few days, then we will start the rehabilitation process. We expect it will take eight to 10 weeks,” he said.


Saudi chef to kings reveals latest recipes for culinary success

As well as developing Arab recipes for Saudi dairy products, Tawfiq Qadri has cooked up more than 3,000 different hot, cold, and pastry meals. (Supplied)
As well as developing Arab recipes for Saudi dairy products, Tawfiq Qadri has cooked up more than 3,000 different hot, cold, and pastry meals. (Supplied)
Updated 19 sec ago

Saudi chef to kings reveals latest recipes for culinary success

As well as developing Arab recipes for Saudi dairy products, Tawfiq Qadri has cooked up more than 3,000 different hot, cold, and pastry meals. (Supplied)
  • 58-year-old Tawfiq Qadri still oozes the same enthusiasm for food preparation as he did as child

MAKKAH: A top Saudi cook hailed as the chef to kings is set to pass on more of his culinary skills and recipes with the release of a new book.

Tawfiq Qadri, who has worked in palace kitchens for a succession of monarchs, is due to finish his third cookbook, “On the Table of the Caliph.”
And the 58-year-old still oozes the same enthusiasm for food preparation as he did as child.
“It all started when I was seven years old. I was fascinated with the sight of my mother in the kitchen, and I used to help in cutting carrots and cucumbers and cleaning rice. I was the only one of 16 brothers and sisters to help her at our home in Madinah,” he told Arab News.
“I joined the scouts during intermediate and high school and was the chef of my classmates at the time. I became famous for cooking the popular Hijazi dishes, which the scouts enjoyed despite my lack of experience.”
After moving to Italy to train as a chef, Qadri’s career took off as he later made a name for himself catering for royals, presidents, and celebrities.
But his rise to fame in the cuisine arts did not get off to a smooth start.
After graduating from high school in Madinah, he got a job at the Saudi Central Bank, an experience which left a bad taste in his mouth. Working in a small office, Qadri felt trapped in an environment he said killed his creative passion to cook.
At the age of 19, just six months into his job, he quit the bank without telling his family and went to stay at his uncle’s hotel. With the help of his relative, and with his parents’ blessing, Qadri enrolled in a bachelor’s degree course at an Italian institute in Sicily, spending two-and-a-half years there as the only Arab student.

BACKGROUND

• After graduating from high school in Madinah, he got a job at the Saudi Central Bank, an experience which left a bad taste in his mouth. Working in a small office, Qadri felt trapped in an environment he said killed his creative passion to cook.

• At the age of 19, just six months into his job, he quit the bank without telling his family and went to stay at his uncle’s hotel. With the help of his relative, and with his parents’ blessing, Qadri enrolled in a bachelor’s degree course at an Italian institute in Sicily, spending two-and-a-half years there as the only Arab student. He also gained a master’s degree and Ph.D. in the US based on his thesis on managing kitchens and tourist facilities.

On returning home, in 1981 he took up employment with the Royal Saudi Navy, based in Riyadh. There, he was head chef and supervisor of the navy officers’ club and would often fly to Toulon in France to join a ship that regularly sailed to Saudi Arabia, working on board as a chef. After four years in the navy, during which time he rose to the rank of sergeant, he moved into military supply management, eventually heading the operation, and organizing budgets for the whole of the Kingdom.
When the Gulf crisis started in 1990, he was commissioned to join the Ministry of Defense and became the chef of the Allied Forces, earning the rank of chief sergeant.
After taking early retirement from the navy, Qadri spent six years with Saudia airline’s catering division, developing a range of dishes, before advising international hotels on food provision and judging in many culinary competitions throughout the Arab world.
While working with Saudia airline, Qadri was featured in a Saudi newspaper article under the headline, “Passengers Love him Before Seeing Him.” On the back of the publicity, he was given responsibility for Hijazi cooking at the palace of the late King Fahd and went on to work for the late King Abdullah, and now King Salman, notably preparing the kitchen during the visit of former US President Barack Obama.
He also gained a master’s degree and Ph.D. in the US based on his thesis on managing kitchens and tourist facilities. As well as developing Arab recipes for Saudi dairy products, Qadri has cooked up more than 3,000 different hot, cold, and pastry meals, and created 42 new recipes. He is also the author of books “Saudi and the Star of the Table,” and “Guide of the Quick Cooking,” with “On the Table of the Caliph” due to be completed soon.


Coronavirus booster dose ‘unnecessary,’ say Saudi experts

A medical worker prepares a dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine at the first drive-through vaccination center in the Saudi capital Riyadh. (AFP file photo)
A medical worker prepares a dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine at the first drive-through vaccination center in the Saudi capital Riyadh. (AFP file photo)
Updated 53 sec ago

Coronavirus booster dose ‘unnecessary,’ say Saudi experts

A medical worker prepares a dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine at the first drive-through vaccination center in the Saudi capital Riyadh. (AFP file photo)
  • More than 40.7 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Saudi Arabia

JEDDAH: A third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine is unnecessary, according to Saudi health experts.
“If the two doses of the vaccine prevent severe illness/staying in hospital/death, it does not make sense for the general population to receive a third dose,” said deputy health minister for preventive health, Dr. Abdullah Assiri.
Assiri, who is also an infectious diseases consultant, added: “At this stage of excellent vaccination coverage, we need to reconsider the rationale and method of laboratory testing for COVID-19, and judge the pandemic only from the perspective of the burden of disease on society.”
The comments came after news of proposed booster shots of Pfizer and BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine for the general public, and third jabs for people aged 65 and older and other vulnerable groups.
Meanwhile, infectious disease expert, Ahmed Al-Hakawi, said that accelerating demand for approval of a third (booster) dose for everyone was not supported by a study he cited.

FASTFACT

546k

The total number of coronavirus cases in KSA reached 546,479.

Titled “Safety and Efficacy of the BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine through 6 Months,” the study, published on Sept. 15, was conducted on more than 45,000 participants in 152 sites in six countries.
The study concluded that “through 6 months of follow-up and despite a gradual decline in vaccine efficacy, BNT162b2 had a favorable safety profile and was highly efficacious in preventing COVID-19.”
“The vaccine still provides protection against severe disease even six months after the second dose,” said Al-Hakawi, who is also a hospital epidemiologist in Riyadh.
Saudi Arabia recorded 68 new cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) on Saturday, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 546,479, the Ministry of Health said.
New recoveries reported amounted to 77, raising the total number to 535,450.
With the high recovery rate, the number of active cases has declined to 2,373, of which 361 are in critical care.
Five people have died in the past 24 hours, raising the total number of deaths to 8,656.


New Saudi supercar club ‘DRB 1921’ offers bespoke experiences

The club is set to offer outstanding experiences that are tailored to accommodate those who appreciate state-of-the-art technology and a thrilling ride. (Supplied)
The club is set to offer outstanding experiences that are tailored to accommodate those who appreciate state-of-the-art technology and a thrilling ride. (Supplied)
Updated 47 min 41 sec ago

New Saudi supercar club ‘DRB 1921’ offers bespoke experiences

The club is set to offer outstanding experiences that are tailored to accommodate those who appreciate state-of-the-art technology and a thrilling ride. (Supplied)
  • DRB 1921, the supercar club for exotic car owners in Saudi Arabia, also celebrates 100 years of motor cars in the Kingdom
  • The inaugural event will take place in the north of Riyadh on Sept. 30, where members will participate in the ‘320 km Speed Challenge’

JEDDAH: Continuing to grow its portfolio of unique experiences in Saudi Arabia, Extreme Events has announced the opening of a supercar members’ club, DRB 1921.

The club creates bespoke events and tours at some of the most iconic destinations around the globe, including internationally recognized race circuits such as Silverstone International Circuit in the UK.

“Combining thrilling driving events with luxurious hospitality, world-class curation, attention to detail and customer care will bring members back time and time again,” a statement said.

To celebrate Saudi Arabia’s passion for high performance cars, DRB 1921’s name is inspired by an Arabic meaning of route (DRB) and a celebratory date when historians noted the first motor vehicles arrived in the Kingdom, spawning the nation’s love for cars.

Moreover, this year marks 100 years of motor cars in the Kingdom. With such richness and passion for motoring, DRB 1921 is set to offer outstanding experiences that are tailored to accommodate those who appreciate state-of-the-art technology and a thrilling ride.

Each event is carefully tailored to ensure it meets every member’s expectation and creates the most memorable moments.

With every supercar having its own unique nuances and the average top speed of over 420 km an hour, DRB 1921 provides remarkable experiences in a controlled environment with expert supervision, letting everyone test their driving limits and truly tapping each car’s potential.

Whether it is a scenic drive in the most beautiful and uncharted locations in Saudi Arabia or an exciting speed challenge at an internationally recognized race circuit, DRB 1921 guarantees car owners the driving experience of a lifetime.

HIGHLIGHT

DRB 1921’s name is inspired by an Arabic meaning of route (DRB) and a celebratory date when historians noted the first motor vehicles arrived in the Kingdom, spawning the nation’s love for cars.

Each journey is complemented by the pinnacle of luxury hospitality and exquisite gastronomy, where a like-minded community of supercar owners come together.

DRB 1921 partners with a selection of the world’s top suppliers such as CARS Middle East (Classic Automotive Relocation Services) to ensure the very best assistance and concierge to look after members’ luxury cars, as well as a personal brokerage service that is exceptionally discreet, affording each client complete anonymity.

For those who are ready to master the maximum top speed in these high velocity road vehicles, DRB 1921 is organizing its inaugural event “320km Speed Challenge” on Sept. 30.

The event exclusively takes place on a private non-commercial runway owned by the Saudi Aviation Club, located in Al-Thumama, in the north of Riyadh.

Measuring 4.5 km in length, this vast runway has previously been identified by NASA as one of the few landing destinations across the globe for aborted space shuttle missions.

On this day, supercar owners have an opportunity to join a passionate community for an exhilarating driving experience and an incredible day out.

“Extreme Events is very proud to launch DRB 1921 in Saudi Arabia because it opens the opportunity for supercar owners to test their skills and unlock real potential of their cars in a safe environment,” said James Cooke-Priest, managing director at Extreme Events.

He added: “The concept also encourages a niche community to come together and share different experiences of driving exceptionally advanced supercars. I see DRB 1921 beyond just a private club, I see it becoming a community hub for like-minded car enthusiasts in the Kingdom.”


Head of KSA’s King Abdulaziz Foundation meets Mauritanian PM

Head of KSA’s King Abdulaziz Foundation meets Mauritanian PM
Updated 18 September 2021

Head of KSA’s King Abdulaziz Foundation meets Mauritanian PM

Head of KSA’s King Abdulaziz Foundation meets Mauritanian PM

RIYADH: Secretary-General of the King Abdulaziz Foundation Dr. Fahd bin Abdullah Al-Semari met Mauritanian Prime Minister Mohamed Ould Bilal Massoud in the country’s capital, Nouakchott.

The meeting, which included an accompanying foundation delegation, was attended by Saudi Ambassador to Mauritania Dr. Hazaa bin Zabin Al-Mutairi.

During the meeting, both sides discussed cooperation between the foundation and the National Documents Administration in Mauritania, and ways to enhance and develop their relationship.

Both Saudi and Mauritanian sides also discussed a number of topics related to heritage and cultural issues.

Al-Semari also held a meeting with the director of Mauritanian National Documents, Dr. Muhammad Al-Mukhtar Sayed Muhammad Al-Hadi, to discuss ways to enhance cooperation between the two sides.

 

 

 

 


World leaders to explore future of healthcare in summit hosted by Saudi non-profit

World leaders to explore future of healthcare in summit hosted by Saudi non-profit
Updated 52 min 56 sec ago

World leaders to explore future of healthcare in summit hosted by Saudi non-profit

World leaders to explore future of healthcare in summit hosted by Saudi non-profit
  • The “Health is Wealth” roundtable aims to develop tangible solutions to global problems
  • The Future Investment Initiative Institute is a new foundation aimed at making a positive impact on humanity

RIYADH: World leaders will gather to discuss how the world can prepare for future pandemics and drive solutions to global issues at a roundtable hosted by the Future Investment Initiative Institute on Tuesday.

The “Health is Wealth” roundtable will be attended by heads of states, UN ambassadors, corporate leaders and government officials, and will see the Saudi-based institute launch its Global Infectious Diseases Index.

From disparate investment in health to inequalities in access, the FII Institute’s roundtable aims to “address these issues and drive tangible solutions,” the organization said.

Institute CEO Richard Attias said: “The pandemic uncovered some harsh realities; the global economy shrunk by about 4 percent, mobility came to an abrupt standstill, millions of people were pushed into extreme poverty, and weaknesses in our global health systems were exposed.

“For every $1 invested in health, the world could see an economic return between $2 and $4 with developing countries benefiting from the highest returns,” Attias continued. “Now is the moment to charter a path toward more equitable, sustainable, and resilient health systems.”

Speakers at Tuesday’s roundtable will include FII Institute Chairman H.E. Yasir Al-Rumayyan, who is from Saudi Arabia, as well as World Trade Organization Director-General Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, UN Refugee Agency Goodwill Ambassador Nomzamo Mbatha, and US TB Alliance President and CEO Dr. Mel Spigelman.

The roundtable is timed to coincide with the UN General Assembly, which is taking place throughout September — and top of the agenda for the world leaders gathering in New York has been the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

The UN has called for multilateral solutions and international cooperation to address the pandemic, and the “Health is Wealth” roundtable is anticipated to plug into that conversation in a hybrid digital and in-person meeting.

The FII Institute is a new global nonprofit foundation based in Riyadh that invests in projects that “turn ideas into real-world solutions.” It focuses investment on five areas — sustainability, healthcare, education, artificial intelligence, and robotics — to address the most pressing issues.