Scottish police alerted to ‘suspicious activity’ of Taliban ally near nuclear weapons base

Scottish police alerted to ‘suspicious activity’ of Taliban ally near nuclear weapons base
Britain’s Royal Navy nuclear-powered submarine HMS Astute sails into the River Clyde towards HM Naval Base Clyde in Faslane, near Glasgow, Scotland, Nov. 20, 2009. (Reuters)
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Updated 09 October 2021

Scottish police alerted to ‘suspicious activity’ of Taliban ally near nuclear weapons base

Scottish police alerted to ‘suspicious activity’ of Taliban ally near nuclear weapons base
  • Local residents in Scotland said they saw eight men arrive at Waheed Totakhyl’s Scotland home and leave just 20 minutes later
  • He has previously expressed support for the Taliban, sold Osama bin Laden pizzas, and called for the death of US soldiers

LONDON: Residents living near a military complex holding nuclear submarines in Scotland, UK, have alerted police to suspicious activity on land rented by a supporter of the Taliban adjacent to the naval base, Sky News reported.

Waheed Totakhyl once publicly called for the death of US soldiers in Afghanistan and his brother is currently serving as a military commander for the Taliban in Kabul.

He rents a farm less than five miles away from a critical Royal Navy submarine base, which holds submarines equipped with nuclear weapons. 

Local residents said they have witnessed a number of men visiting him in recent weeks. They alerted local police to the activity, telling them that on Aug. 10 eight men arrived on Totakhyl’s farm in two vehicles and then left just 20 minutes later.

Local residents said the men claimed to be Afghans who had traveled there from London — a trip that takes around eight hours each way.

One anonymous local told Sky News: “Of course, there may be absolutely nothing to worry about. However, look at the circumstances of this and the geography. The farm is next door to one of the country's most sensitive military sites.

“We're being given new warnings of a terrorist threat, and now we learn that the tenant at (Totakhyl’s farm) supports the Taliban, with a brother who is a commander.

“I think when you connect the dots, the least we could do was to pass on our concerns. The fleeting appearance of these young males, having traveled from London, was very odd.”

Totakhyl’s farm overlooks a strip of water used by vessels as they enter and leave the base, as well as an accommodation building housing Royal Navy personnel. He rejected, however, any accusations that he was using the base for nefarious purposes.

He “likes to be a farmer,” he said, explaining that his visitors were there purely to discuss events in Afghanistan, which was recently seized in its entirety by the Taliban.

“My friends visit me from Birmingham, London. They came this year just to visit me and talk about the situation in Afghanistan,” Totakhyl told Sky News.

“We were talking about Afghanistan, what was going to happen in Afghanistan and how can we help the people of Afghanistan from the UK.”

He added: “I rent (the farm) because I like to be a farmer and enjoy the weather… of Scotland. I have never done anything wrong in the UK. Whatever I have done, this is for my people, for my country.”

However, the man — who arrived in the UK in 2001 and now owns a takeaway shop — has taken actions in the past that may warrant additional scrutiny of his behavior.

His shop once sold Osama bin Laden pizzas, and a picture online depicts him holding a rifle alongside three other armed men dressed in military fatigues.

The picture, he said, was taken in Afghanistan during a visit to Bagram jail where his brother was held before being released by the Taliban and reclaiming his position as a commander in the group.

In 2010, he publicly called for the death of American soldiers in Afghanistan during a protest, and even other Afghans have called for action to be taken against him. In September, Afghan asylum seekers called for Totakhyl to be deported over his vocal support of the Taliban.

Speaking anonymously, one former interpreter who worked with the British Army said last month: “He's helping support the refugees and he is helping support Taliban. He needs to take one side, not two.

“If it is right that his brother is a commander of Taliban or supports Taliban, he needs to be deported.”


Nuclear weapons a ‘loaded gun’, UN chief warns in Hiroshima

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a speech in Hiroshima, Japan Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (AP)
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a speech in Hiroshima, Japan Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (AP)
Updated 58 min 15 sec ago

Nuclear weapons a ‘loaded gun’, UN chief warns in Hiroshima

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a speech in Hiroshima, Japan Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (AP)
  • Three days after the Hiroshima bombing, Washington dropped a second atomic bomb on the Japanese port city of Nagasaki, killing about 74,000 people and leading to the end of World War II

HIROSHIMA, Japan: “Humanity is playing with a loaded gun” as crises with the potential for nuclear disaster proliferate worldwide, UN head Antonio Guterres said in Hiroshima on Saturday, the 77th anniversary of the first atomic bomb attack.
At an annual memorial, Guterres warned of the risk posed by crises in Ukraine, the Middle East and the Korean peninsula as he described the horrors endured by the Japanese city.
“Tens of thousands of people were killed in this city in the blink of an eye. Women, children and men were incinerated in a hellish fire,” he said.
Survivors were “cursed with a radioactive legacy” of cancer and other health problems.
“We must ask: What have we learned from the mushroom cloud that swelled above this city?“
Around 140,000 people died when Hiroshima was bombed by the United States on August 6, 1945, a toll that includes those who perished after the blast from radiation exposure.
Today, “crises with grave nuclear undertones are spreading fast,” Guterres said, repeating warnings he made this week at a nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty conference in New York.
“Humanity is playing with a loaded gun.”
Before dawn, survivors and their relatives began to gather at Hiroshima’s Peace Memorial Park to pay tribute to the victims.
A silent prayer was held at 8.15 am, the moment the bomb was dropped.
The Russian ambassador was not invited to the ceremony but visited Hiroshima on Thursday to lay flowers at the memorial site.
Since Russia invaded Ukraine in February, President Vladimir Putin has made thinly veiled threats hinting at a willingness to deploy tactical nuclear weapons.
In a speech on Saturday, Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui cited Leo Tolstoy, the Russian author of “War and Peace,” saying: “Never build your happiness on the misfortune of others, for only in their happiness can you find your own.”
Three days after the Hiroshima bombing, Washington dropped a second atomic bomb on the Japanese port city of Nagasaki, killing about 74,000 people and leading to the end of World War II.
There are now fewer than 119,000 officially recognized survivors of the two nuclear attacks, according to government statistics from March.
The United States remains the only country ever to have used nuclear weapons in conflict.
But around 13,000 are now held in state arsenals worldwide, Guterres said.
Saturday was the first time Guterres attended the Hiroshima memorial in person as UN chief, with a visit last year canceled because of the Covid-19 pandemic.
 

 


Bangladesh seeks China help to repatriate Rohingya refugees

Bangladesh seeks China help to repatriate Rohingya refugees
Updated 08 August 2022

Bangladesh seeks China help to repatriate Rohingya refugees

Bangladesh seeks China help to repatriate Rohingya refugees
  • Despite attempts to send Rohingya refugees back, they refused, fearing danger in Myanmar, which was exacerbated by the military takeover last year

DHAKA: Bangladesh on Sunday sought cooperation from China to repatriate Rohingya refugees to Myanmar during a visit by Foreign Minister Wang Yi, who promised better trade ties, investment and support for infrastructure development in the South Asian nation.
China had used its influence in Myanmar to broker a November 2017 agreement to repatriate about 700,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees who fled persecution in Myanmar in August that year. Despite attempts to send them back, the refugees refused, fearing danger in Myanmar, which was exacerbated by the military takeover last year.
Yi arrived in Dhaka on Saturday evening and met with Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina and Foreign Minister A.K. Abdul Momen. They discussed bilateral and global issues before his departure on Sunday morning, said Shahriar Alam, Bangladesh’s junior minister for foreign affairs.
Bangladesh has strong relations with China, which is a major trade partner mostly for raw materials. But maintaining close ties with Beijing is challenging for Bangladesh, which also balances diplomatic and trade relationship with both India and the United States, China’s main rivals.
More than 500 Chinese companies are active in Bangladesh. China is involved in the country’s all major infrastructure projects such as seaports, a river tunnel and highways, and helped build its largest bridge over the River Padma at a cost of $3.6 billion.
Amid recent tensions between China and Taiwan, Bangladesh issued a statement reiterating its support for the “one-China” policy. After winning elections in 2008, Hasina’s administration closed the Taiwanese business representative office in Dhaka in response to a request from China, and since then China has increased its engagement in Bangladesh.
Bangladesh’s garment industry, which brings in more than 80 percent of foreign currency from exports, is heavily dependent on China for raw materials.
On Sunday, Yi told Hasina during a courtesy call that his country considers Bangladesh as a “strategic development partner” and would continue to support it, said Ihsanul Karim, the presidential press secretary.
The United News of Bangladesh agency reported that Yi also promised to stand beside Bangladesh “on all issues at international forums.”
The Bangladesh Sangbad Sangstha, state-run news agency, reported that Hasina raised the global tensions caused by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and Western sanctions against Moscow, saying “people (across the world) are enduring difficult times … South Asia, Southeast Asia and China can work together for economic progress.”
Alam said that Yi agreed to expand trade benefits by raising to 98 percent duty-free access from current 97 percent of Bangladeshi products and services to Chinese markets.
“It’s a good news for Bangladesh as we have a thriving economy based on exports,” Alam said. “Now they have offered another 1 percent from Sept. 1,” he said, adding that the new tax advantage is likely to include garments, woven and other products that had previously faced some barriers.
He said Bangladesh would get a list from China soon about the products and services that would get duty-free access.
Alam said that Yi explained to the Bangladeshi foreign minister that “some countries misunderstand and misinterpret” China. He did not elaborate.
But Momen told reporters separately that the Chinese minister mentioned that a section of Taiwanese people was being provoked against the sovereignty of China.
The junior minister said China pledged to work continuously to resolve the Rohingya crisis and quoted Yi as saying that the internal challenges in Myanmar were not only troubling Bangladesh but also other countries.
”Our foreign minister strongly reiterated that Chinese cooperation is needed. China has progressed on resolving the Rohingya issue and we need the situation to come to an end,” Alam said.
On Sunday, Bangladesh and China signed or renewed four agreements and memorandums of understanding on disaster management, infrastructure and cultural exchanges.
Analyst Munshi Faiz Ahmad, who served as Bangladeshi ambassador in Beijing, said that Yi’s visit was very significant for both countries.
“To resolve the Rohingya crisis Bangladesh needs support from China. This visit will help strengthen the bilateral relations,” Ahmad told The Associated Press.
“To us, China is very important. We also need to maintain good relations with both India and the United States as they are also very important development partners of Bangladesh. There is nothing to be afraid of because of Bangladesh’s close ties with China,” he said.


US Senate adopts sweeping climate and health plan, in major victory for Biden

US Senate adopts sweeping climate and health plan, in major victory for Biden
Updated 08 August 2022

US Senate adopts sweeping climate and health plan, in major victory for Biden

US Senate adopts sweeping climate and health plan, in major victory for Biden
  • The bill — officially known as the “Inflation Reduction Act” — passed the Senate with no Republicans voting in favor

WASHINGTON: After 18 months of arduous negotiations and a marathon night of debate, the US Senate on Sunday passed Joe Biden’s ambitious climate, tax and health care plan — a significant victory for the president ahead of crucial midterm elections.
Voting as a unified bloc and with the tie-breaking vote cast by Vice President Kamala Harris, Democrats approved the $430 billion spending plan, which will go to the House of Representatives next week, where it is expected to pass before being signed into law by Biden.
The plan, crafted in sensitive talks with members on the right wing of his Democratic Party, would include the biggest US investment ever on climate — $370 billion aimed at effecting a 40 percent drop in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.
That would give Biden a clear victory on one of his top agenda items and go some way toward restoring US leadership in meeting the global climate challenge.
Biden hailed the passage of the bill, highlighting the work that went into it — and acknowledging that not everyone is happy with the final result.
“It required many compromises. Doing important things almost always does. The House should pass this as soon as possible and I look forward to signing it into law,” the president said in a statement.
The bill — officially known as the “Inflation Reduction Act” — passed the Senate with no Republicans voting in favor.
Conservative lawmakers have criticized the bill as wasteful spending, with top Republican Senator Mitch McConnell accusing Democrats of voting to “double down on their economic disaster.”
The bill would provide Americans with a tax credit of up to $7,500 when purchasing an electric car, plus a 30 percent discount when they install solar panels on their roofs.
It would also provide millions to help protect and conserve forests — which have been increasingly ravaged in recent years by wildfires during record heat waves that scientists say are linked to global warming.
Billions of dollars in tax credits would also go to some of the country’s worst-polluting industries to help their transition to greener methods — a measure bitterly opposed by some liberal Democrats who have, however, accepted this as a least-bad alternative after months of frustration.
Biden, who came to office with promises of sweeping reforms, has seen his hopes dashed, then revived, then dashed again.
Democrats’ narrow edge in the Senate has given a virtual veto to moderates like Joe Manchin of West Virginia, who earlier had used that power to block Biden’s much more expansive Build Back Better plan.
But in late July, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer managed to engineer a compromise with the West Virginian, whose state’s economy depends heavily on coal mining.
“This bill is gonna change America for decades,” Schumer said after its passage, while Manchin tweeted that it “will lower the inflation taxes that have been so hurtful for West Virginian and American families.”
Senators finally opened debate on the text on Saturday, with final passage not until Sunday afternoon.
Late Saturday, they began working through a marathon procedure known as a “vote-a-rama,” in which members can propose dozens of amendments and demand a vote on each one.
That allowed both Republicans, who view Biden’s plan as too costly, and liberal Democrats, who say it does not reach far enough, to make their opposition clear.
Influential progressive Senator Bernie Sanders used that platform through the evening to propose several amendments aimed at strengthening social planks in the legislation, which were considerably weakened during the months of negotiation.
The bill would provide $64 billion for health care initiatives and ensure a lowering of some drug costs — which can be 10 times more expensive in the United States than in some other rich countries.
But progressive Democrats long ago had to give up their ambitions for free preschool and community colleges and expanded health care for the elderly.
“Millions of seniors will continue to have rotten teeth and lack the dentures, hearing aids or eyeglasses that they deserve,” Sanders said from the Senate floor. “This bill, as currently written, does nothing to address it.”
But fellow Democrats, eager to pass the legislation ahead of November midterms when control of Congress is at stake, have rejected any change in the text.
To help offset the plan’s massive spending, it would reduce the US deficit through a new 15-percent minimum tax on companies with profits of $1 billion or more — a move targeting some that now pay far less.
That measure could generate more than $258 billion in tax receipts for the government over the next 10 years, by some estimates.


Biden denounces killings of four Muslims in US city

President Joe Biden speaks at the White House in Washington, U.S., August 5, 2022. (REUTERS)
President Joe Biden speaks at the White House in Washington, U.S., August 5, 2022. (REUTERS)
Updated 08 August 2022

Biden denounces killings of four Muslims in US city

President Joe Biden speaks at the White House in Washington, U.S., August 5, 2022. (REUTERS)
  • “Investigators believe Friday’s murder may be connected to three recent murders of Muslim men also from South Asia,” the statement said

WASHINGTON: President Joe Biden on Sunday deplored the killings of four Muslim men in New Mexico, which police say may be linked.
“I am angered and saddened by the horrific killings of four Muslim men in Albuquerque,” the US president said on Twitter.
“While we await a full investigation, my prayers are with the victims’ families, and my Administration stands strongly with the Muslim community. These hateful attacks have no place in America.”
Police in Albuquerque, New Mexico’s largest city, said Saturday they are investigating the murders of three Muslim men that they now suspect are related to a fourth homicide from last year.
The Albuquerque police department said in a statement they had discovered the latest victim overnight Friday.
His body was discovered near a Lutheran Family Services office that provides assistance to refugees, TV station KOB4 reported.
Police did not identify the man but said he was in his mid-20s, Muslim and “a native from South Asia.”
“Investigators believe Friday’s murder may be connected to three recent murders of Muslim men also from South Asia,” the statement said.
Two of the previous victims were Muslim Pakistani men, a 27-year-old whose body was found on August 1 and a 41-year-old who was found on July 26.
Detectives are now investigating whether these murders are connected to the death of a Muslim man from Afghanistan who was killed on November 7, 2021, outside of the business he ran with his brother in Albuquerque, the statement said.
The police urged anyone with information to call a tip line and said the FBI was assisting with the investigation.
New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham expressed outrage at the killings, calling them “wholly intolerable,” and said she was sending additional state police officers to Albuquerque to aid in the investigation.
She said she was sending additional state police officers to Albuquerque to help with the investigation.
“We will continue to do everything we can to support to the Muslim community of Albuquerque and greater New Mexico,” she said.
The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the largest US Muslim civil rights group, has offered a $10,000 reward to whoever provides information leading to the killer or killers’ arrest.
Tensions have risen sharply in the city’s Muslim community.
“Now, people are beginning to panic,” Tahir Gauba, the director of public affairs with the Islamic Center of New Mexico, told the Albuquerque Journal.

 


Alabama town disbands police department over racist text

A Bessemer police vehicle patrols in Bessemer, Alabama. (AFP file photo)
A Bessemer police vehicle patrols in Bessemer, Alabama. (AFP file photo)
Updated 08 August 2022

Alabama town disbands police department over racist text

A Bessemer police vehicle patrols in Bessemer, Alabama. (AFP file photo)
  • The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office on Friday condemned the two officers’ actions and said it stands with the city “in providing emergency law enforcement related service to the citizens (of Vincent) at this time”

VINCENT, Alabama: A racist text message sent by a police officer has prompted officials in a small Alabama town to disband their police department and fire the police chief and assistant chief.
Vincent Mayor James Latimore on Thursday confirmed that Police Chief James Srygley and Assistant Chief John L. Goss had been dismissed, al.com reported.
The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office on Friday condemned the two officers’ actions and said it stands with the city “in providing emergency law enforcement related service to the citizens (of Vincent) at this time.”
In the message, which recently surfaced on social media, someone identified as “752″ texts: “What do y’all call a pregnant slave?” An unidentified recipient responds twice: “?” and “??”
“752″ answers: “BOGO Buy one, get one free”
“This has torn this community apart. It doesn’t matter what color we are as long as we do right by people,” City Councilman Corey Abrams said during Thursday’s council meeting.
On Tuesday, Latimore said “appropriate action has been taken” against the officer alleged to have sent the text, though at the time he would not name the person or anyone involved.
The city’s website lists three people in its department: Srygley, Goss and Officer Lee Carden.
During the council meeting, Latimore announced he had suspended the chief and assistant chief, and the council voted to end the agency. Latimer said Carden turned in his resignation via text message just hours after the city council voted to dissolve the department.
Located in central Alabama, southeast of Birmingham, Vincent has a population of just under 2,000 people. It’s located in Shelby, St. Clair, and Talladega counties.