Football icon Mohamed Salah to be part of Egypt’s national curriculum

Football icon Mohamed Salah to be part of Egypt’s national curriculum
Liverpool’s Egyptian midfielder Mohamed Salah celebrates after scoring against Manchester United at Old Trafford, Manchester, England, Oct. 24, 2021. (AFP)
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Updated 26 October 2021

Football icon Mohamed Salah to be part of Egypt’s national curriculum

Football icon Mohamed Salah to be part of Egypt’s national curriculum
  • Students will learn about his sporting success, philanthropy, family-oriented Muslim lifestyle
  • Textbook: ‘He is a role model to millions of Egyptians’

LONDON: The story of Egyptian footballing icon Mohamed Salah will be added to the Egyptian national curriculum to teach children what it takes to become a hero on and off the pitch.

Liverpool striker and Egyptian national Mohamad Salah, 29, is undeniably one of the world’s best footballers, and his life story will now be taught to Egyptian children in the hopes that it will spur students on to success in life.

His career, consistent goal-scoring at the top echelons of international football, and philanthropic activities will be taught in English-language textbooks to primary- and secondary-school students across Egypt.

The much-loved Egyptian has brought joy to the Arab country through his football prowess, earning him the nickname “the happiness maker.”

Salah often appears on-screen alongside his hijabi wife and young daughter, who is named Makka after the holy city in Saudi Arabia.

His quiet lifestyle — in which he is visibly Muslim, including praying on-pitch after goals — and massive donations to Egypt’s poor have earned him national and international admiration.

In his own birthplace, the poor farming community of Nagrig in the Nile Delta, Salah has poured money into charitable works.

He has funded a new girls’ school, a water treatment center, an ambulance center, and a charity for orphans and the vulnerable.

Primary-school children will mainly be taught of his footballing success, while secondary-school textbooks will focus now on his philanthropic activities and will pose questions prompting students to examine what it means to be a hero.

“Salah’s desire to help others is because he wants to give young people a chance to succeed,” the secondary-school book says. “He is a role model to millions of Egyptians who give him the nickname ‘the happiness maker’.”

Salah will now sit alongside other Egyptian heroes featured in textbooks, such as Nobel Prize-winning novelist Naguib Mahfouz and UK-based cardiologist Sir Magdi Yacoub.