Tuwaiq Sculptural Symposium reflects Vision 2030 aim to transform Riyadh

Tuwaiq Sculptural Symposium reflects Vision 2030 aim to transform Riyadh
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A creative and abstract sculpture in progress at the symposium. (Riyadh Art)
Tuwaiq Sculptural Symposium reflects Vision 2030 aim to transform Riyadh
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Anna Korver, The Lighthouses triptych, Tuwaiq International Sculpture Symposium, 2021 at JAX District, Riyadh. (Courtesy of Riyadh Art)
Tuwaiq Sculptural Symposium reflects Vision 2030 aim to transform Riyadh
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Haider Alawi Al-Alawi, Desert Lines, Tuwaiq International Sculpture Symposium, 2021 at JAX District, Riyadh. (Courtesy of Riyadh Art)
Tuwaiq Sculptural Symposium reflects Vision 2030 aim to transform Riyadh
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Kim De Ruysscher, Unseen, Tuwaiq International Sculpture Symposium, 2021 at JAX District, Riyadh. (Courtesy of Riyadh Art)
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Updated 09 December 2021

Tuwaiq Sculptural Symposium reflects Vision 2030 aim to transform Riyadh

Tuwaiq Sculptural Symposium reflects Vision 2030 aim to transform Riyadh

RIYADH: Two sculptures glisten in the sunlight in an outdoor space in JAX, the recently developed creative district in the industrial zone of Diriyah, just outside of Riyadh. They are part of the third Tuwaiq International Sculpture Symposium held under the theme of The Poetics of Space, which featured 20 works by Saudi and international artists focusing largely on the interplay between light and shadow.

Some of the large abstract sculptures appear to undulate like waves with their curvaceous forms while others challenge the surrounding desert landscape with their bold geometric forms. Saudi artist Wafa Al-Qunibit’s work Allah is representative of her desire to speak to both the Saudi and international community through intersecting and overlapping circles carved into marble depicting the name of God in Arabic. Karin van Ommeren’s Awareness Stone was created to symbolize eternity through a composition that has no beginning or end.

The 20 sculptors were chosen out of 418 applicants from 71 countries. The selected artists came to Riyadh, where they all created their works over a period of three weeks from Nov. 15 until Dec. 5 from giant blocks of black and white pearl marble imported from Oman. The resulting works are exhibited on site in JAX for four days until Dec.10.

What was crucial to the initiative was the element of cultural exchange — uniting artists from around the world in Riyadh through creative dialogue with the end goal of beautifying the city of Riyadh.

HIGHLIGHT

Artists Anna Korver, Haider Alawi Al-Alawi and Kim De Ruysscher announced as winners of the 2021 symposium

The symposium was organized by Riyadh Art, dubbed as one of the world’s largest public art projects of its kind. It is also one of Riyadh’s four megaprojects launched by King Salman bin Abdulaziz, on March 19, 2019. An integral component of Saudi Vision 2030, its mission is to transform Riyadh into a sustainable and environmentally friendly city.

“We tried to update the project this year to make it bigger and more international through workshops and panels and educational programs,” Sarah Alruwayti, architectural project advisor at The Royal Commission for Riyadh City responsible for Riyadh Art, told Arab News. “We aim to create a cultural platform not only for visitors but also for sculptors from around the world to engage with each other. We need to get our talents out into the world and the rest of the world needs to learn about us more.”

“We have 12 projects under Riyadh Art, of which two are annual and 10 are permanent, all of which add a lot of value to the economy and society as they focus on developing roads and bridges and they all encompass art,” Alruwayti said. “The projects work to beautify Riyadh—Riyadh is already beautiful but we are working to add more artistry to the city reflecting Vision 2030’s aims to transform the city into a gallery with no walls.”

Ali Jabbar, the curator of the Tuwaiq International Sculpture Symposium, founded the event three years ago in cooperation with the Saudi Ministry of Culture. The first and second symposia, in 2019 and 2020, were held in Riyadh’s diplomatic quarter.

This year marks the first time that the symposium takes place under the umbrella of Riyadh Art. Jabbar, with the help of five heads of international museums, including Eike Dieter Schmidt, the director of the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, and Cristiana Collu, the director of Rome’s Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna, chose the final selection of 20 sculptors.

“The Tuwaiq symposium is the largest one in the world now in terms of organization, size and quality of sculptures and their artistic and technical value,” Jabbar said. “It has placed the Saudi sculpture scene in the world map.”

The winners of the competition were announced on Dec. 7. First prize was awarded to New Zealand artist Anna Korver for her artwork entitled The Lighthouses triptych, which fused abstract geometrical forms with multiple cultural associations, suggesting female figures. Second prize went to Haider Alawi Al-Alawi of Saudi Arabia for his approach in depicting the landscape through a fusion of abstraction and figuration. His sculpture entitled Beauty evokes the Saudi landscape, featuring the sun, wind and sand. Third prize went to the Belgian Kim De Ruysscher for his Unseen, depicting a figurative form covered in what appears to be a kind of drapery, exploring the concepts of illusion and perception.

The next Tuwaiq Sculpture Symposium will take place in 2022.


Picasso heirs launch digital art piece to ride ‘crypto’ wave

Picasso heirs launch digital art piece to ride ‘crypto’ wave
Updated 27 January 2022

Picasso heirs launch digital art piece to ride ‘crypto’ wave

Picasso heirs launch digital art piece to ride ‘crypto’ wave
  • Picasso's granddaughter and her son opened up their apartment, which is swimming in works from their illustrious ancestor, in an upscale Geneva neighborhood
  • They're looking to cash in on and ride a wave of interest in non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, which have netted millions for far-less-known artists

GENEVA: Pablo, meet Crypto. Heirs of Pablo Picasso, the famed 20th-century Spanish artist, are vaulting into 21st-century commerce by selling 1,010 digital art pieces of one of his ceramic works that has never before been seen publicly — riding a fad for “crypto” assets that have taken the art and financial worlds by storm.
For an exclusive interview before the formal launch this week, Picasso’s granddaughter, Marina Picasso, and her son Florian Picasso opened up their apartment — which is swimming in works from their illustrious ancestor — in an upscale Geneva neighborhood. There they offered up a glimpse, however tantalizingly slim, of the piece behind what they’re billing as an unprecedented fusion of old-school fine art and digital assets.
They’re looking to cash in on and ride a wave of interest in non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, which have netted millions for far-less-known artists and been criticized by some as environmentally costly get rich schemes.
A Picasso, his family’s promoters say, would mark the entry of a Grand Master into the game.
In economics jargon, a fungible token is an asset that can be exchanged on a one-for-one basis. Think of dollars or bitcoins — each one has the exact same value and can be traded freely. A non-fungible object, by contrast, has its own distinct value, like an old house or a classic car.
Cross this notion with cryptocurrency technology known as the blockchain and you get NFTs. They are effectively digital certificates of authenticity that can be attached to digital art or, well, pretty much anything else that comes in digital form — audio files, video clips, animated stickers, even a news article read online.
“We’re trying to build a bridge between the NFT world and the fine art world,” said Florian Picasso, the artist’s great-grandson.
The artist’s descendants are playing close to the vest, to drum up interest and protect — for now — a family heirloom. They’re showing only a sliver of the underside of the work linked to the NFTs, a ceramic piece about the size of a large salad bowl. The exposed parts show forms like a thick yellow line, a dribbling green splotch, and a brushed-on number “58” at the base.
Marina Picasso says the cherished pottery piece dates to October 1958, when she was a child.
“It’s a work that represents a face, and it’s very expressive,” she said. “It’s joyful, happy. It represents life ... It’s one of those objects that have been part of our life, our intimate lives — my life with my children.”
Cyril Noterman, a longtime manager for Florian Picasso, and Kathryn Frazier, a publicist for the project, told The Associated Press that Sotheby’s would host an auction in March that will include a unique NFT as well as the actual ceramic bowl.
But Matthew Floris, a spokesman for Sotheby’s, contacted the AP on Wednesday and said in a statement: “Sotheby’s has clarified that it will not be selling an NFT of a work by Pablo Picasso.”
Noterman and Frazier said a first-phase, online sale of more than 1,000 other NFTs starts Friday through the Nifty Gateway and Origin Protocol platforms.
Florian Picasso said they agreed on the colorful ceramic piece because it was “a fun one” to start.
An NFT Picasso brings with it almost epochal symbolism, something like when the Beatles collection was finally put up on iTunes. The family and its business managers say the aim is to create a younger community of Picasso fans.
“Everything is evolving,” said Florian Picasso, insisting that the NFT honors the great artist.
“I think it fits within Picasso’s legacies because we are paying tribute to him and his way of working, which was always being creative,” he said.
How quaint seem those days of yore when Picasso, as the legend has it, would simply doodle on a napkin as payment for a restaurant meal — his handiwork supposedly carrying a value far in excess of the cost of the food and drinks he had enjoyed.
Some of the proceeds will be donated — one portion to a charity that aims to help overcome a shortage of nurses, and another to a nongovernmental organization that wants to help reduce carbon in the atmosphere. The NFTs will also come with music put together by Florian Picasso, who is a DJ and music producer, along with songwriter John Legend and rapper Nas.
Even a full rendering of that track isn’t being publicly released just yet: Florian Picasso played a snippet for a reporter, then turned it off.
“And to hear more, you gotta purchase the NFT,” he quipped.


Saudi pavilion launches Coffee Week at Dubai’s Expo 2020

Saudi pavilion launches Coffee Week at Dubai’s Expo 2020
Updated 26 January 2022

Saudi pavilion launches Coffee Week at Dubai’s Expo 2020

Saudi pavilion launches Coffee Week at Dubai’s Expo 2020

DUBAI: The Saudi pavilion at Dubai’s Expo 2020 Dubai on Tuesday launched Saudi Coffee Week, a five-day event to celebrate the country’s coffee culture.

Running until Jan. 29 from 3:00 to 9:00 p.m., the series features daily activities to inspire and educate visitors on the Kingdom’s coffee traditions that form an essential part of its culture. 

The event will also host two workshops at Sard Café to help guests learn the art of making Saudi coffee. (Supplied)

This includes showing casing a variety of coffee-making and brewing techniques, as well as tasting experiences.

The event will also host two workshops at Sard Café to help guests learn the art of making Saudi coffee.

The pavilion also features booths from Ethiopia, Colombia, Honduras, Panama, and Australia at the Open Square to familiarize visitors with traditions of other countries. 


Curator Maya Allison sheds light on the UAE’s color-filled pavilion at 2022 Venice Biennale

Curator Maya Allison sheds light on the UAE’s color-filled pavilion at 2022 Venice Biennale
Updated 26 January 2022

Curator Maya Allison sheds light on the UAE’s color-filled pavilion at 2022 Venice Biennale

Curator Maya Allison sheds light on the UAE’s color-filled pavilion at 2022 Venice Biennale

DUBAI: Nine years after the UAE gained its independence in 1971, the Emirates Fine Art Society was formed by the first generation of contemporary artists to pioneer cultural activities in the country. One of its experimental members is Emirati land artist Mohamed Ahmed Ibrahim, born in 1962, who will be the sole exhibiting artist at the Venice Biennale’s UAE pavilion in spring 2022.

“Between Sunrise and Sunset” is the title of the upcoming exhibition, which will reunite Ibrahim and Abu Dhabi-based curator Maya Allison in a fifth artistic collaboration. “He’s doing something that I really haven’t seen any other artist do,” Allison told Arab News. “He’s extremely rigorous in his practice as an artist. What looks like a very intuitive, childlike process has underneath it many years of reading and research and thinking about what the nature of art is.”

The exhibition is curator Maya Allison in a fifth artistic collaboration. Supplied

Opening April 23, the exhibition’s installation will take pavilion viewers through a visual journey of the artist’s human-sized and organic sculptural forms, made of paper mache and cardboard, transitioning from black and white to bright colors and vice-versa. It is inspired by Ibrahim’s personal experience of growing up in the Emirati port town of Khor Fakkan, where he encountered time and again a particular notion of light and color in the area’s rocky nature.

“He was born and raised in Khor Fakkan, which has Al-Hajar Mountains behind it,” explained Allison. “Those mountains block the sunset, so that when the sun rises over Khor Fakkan, it’s very colorful and bright. In the middle of the afternoon, the sun goes behind the mountains and there’s just a giant shadow cast across the town. You just move into shadow and the world starts to feel more black and white. That movement is what he’s kind of referring to what you’ll see in the exhibition: the movement from morning till afternoon is very dramatic.”

The installation will take pavilion viewers through a visual journey of the artist’s human-sized and organic sculptural forms. Supplied

Ibrahim is also known for his symbol-filled paintings, draped in vivid color. In his sculptural work, there is more than meets the eye when it comes to his use of colored material. “As a child, he would try to imagine what the sunset looked like from the other side of these mountains. Of course the sunset is very colorful, but he is not able to see it,” said Allison.

“This fascination with bright colors that you see in some of his work is in part related to this sense of depravation from the colors of sunset. I think it’s a very nice outcome — he made the colors that he was missing in that part of the day.”

This year’s iteration of the Venice Biennale is being held under the theme “The Milk of Dreams,” derived from a book by 20th century surrealist artist Leonora Carrington. “One of the core elements of the theme is metamorphosis and the human-landscape relationship. Those two elements are very crucial to his work,” said Allison. “His work is right in that intersection where I think of the moment where nature becomes culture.”


Lyna Khoudri lauds new film ‘Gagarine’ after awards sweep

Lyna Khoudri lauds new film ‘Gagarine’ after awards sweep
Lyna Khoudri gained international recognition for her role in ‘The French Dispatch.' File/AFP
Updated 26 January 2022

Lyna Khoudri lauds new film ‘Gagarine’ after awards sweep

Lyna Khoudri lauds new film ‘Gagarine’ after awards sweep

DUBAI: French-Algerian actress Lyna Khoudri took to social media to celebrate her latest film, which has been dominating awards ceremonies on the international film festival circuit as of late.

 “Gagarine,” starring Khoudri, most recently took home the Lumière prize for Best Debut Film at France’s Lumière Awards and the actress took to Instagram to celebrate on Tuesday.  

“Lumière for the best first film for @gagarinefilm,” wrote the actress on Instagram. “Thank you, my forever friends, for this perfect night,” she added, alongside a picture of herself and “Gagarine” co-star Alséni Bathily at the awards ceremony.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by lynakhoudri (@lynakhoudri)

Khoudri and Bathily accepted the prize on behalf of the film’s directors, Fanny Liatard and Jérémy Trouilh, who were unable to be present at the Jan. 18 event.

The film also won awards at the Athens International Film Festival, Philadelphia Film Festival and Mons International Film Festival.

The movie is a bittersweet French story of a housing complex on the outskirts of Paris. Inaugurated and named after Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, the complex is found to be in a state of disrepair and faces demolition.

The movie is a bittersweet French story of a housing complex on the outskirts of Paris. Supplied

 But 16-year-old Yuri (played by Bathily) refuses to leave. He has nowhere to go after his mother abandoned him. Yuri is a good handyman and with two friends, Houssam (Jamil McCraven) and Diana (Khoudri), tries to carry out repairs with second hand materials before the inspection. He fails, but is inspired to recreate a spaceship in the building’s basement.

Despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the 27th edition of the Lumiere Awards took place in the presence of a limited audience, which included Khoudri, who for the occasion donned a design from her go-to label.

The actress was a vision wearing a sheer slip dress from Parisian maison Chanel, for whom she serves as a muse.

She paired the logo-covered slip dress with a pair of eye-catching sparkling MaryJane pumps.

The actress also sat down with French television channel Canal+ to answer a series of questions.

She stated that she was “very happy and proud” that “Gagarine” won the Best Debut Film award because it is an “excellent film” and she finds it “well deserved.”

When asked what advice she would give to young, aspiring actors, Khoudri said to “believe in your dreams” and “work hard.”

“Gagarine” first screened at the Cannes Market on a virtual platform in June 2020.


Elton John positive for COVID-19, postpones Dallas shows

Elton John positive for COVID-19, postpones Dallas shows
Updated 26 January 2022

Elton John positive for COVID-19, postpones Dallas shows

Elton John positive for COVID-19, postpones Dallas shows
  • "I'm so sorry to anyone who's been inconvenienced by this but I want to keep myself and my team safe," said John
  • The concerts, part of John's "Farewell Yellow Brick Road" tour, were scheduled for January 25 and January 26

NEW YOTK: Pop megastar Elton John on Tuesday postponed two concerts in Dallas — part of what is expected to be a lengthy farewell tour — after testing positive for Covid-19.
“It’s always a massive disappointment to move shows and I’m so sorry to anyone who’s been inconvenienced by this but I want to keep myself and my team safe,” said the British musician, 74, in a statement on social media.
“Fortunately, I’m fully vaccinated and boosted and my symptoms are mild.”
The concerts, part of John’s “Farewell Yellow Brick Road” tour, were scheduled for January 25 and January 26. Both John and the American Airlines Center, where the shows were to take place, said they will be rescheduled and fans should keep their tickets.
John said he expected to be healthy enough to play his show on January 29 in Little Rock, Arkansas.
The tour, which is anticipated to be Sir Elton’s last, has run into pandemic-era cancelations and postponements, like many other performing arts events.
The pop legend also recently had a hip operation that forced him to push back several dates.
Last year, John released an album entitled “The Lockdown Sessions,” which was recorded entirely under Covid-19 restrictions.