TikTok sets up safety advisory council for MENAT region

Short-form video platform TikTok has launched a sector-first safety advisory council for the Middle East, North Africa, and Turkey region. (AFP/File Photo)
Short-form video platform TikTok has launched a sector-first safety advisory council for the Middle East, North Africa, and Turkey region. (AFP/File Photo)
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Updated 08 February 2022

TikTok sets up safety advisory council for MENAT region

Short-form video platform TikTok has launched a sector-first safety advisory council for the Middle East, North Africa, and Turkey region. (AFP/File Photo)
  • Council of 6 inaugural members will guide platform’s safety best practices, policy

RIYADH: Short-form video platform TikTok has launched a sector-first safety advisory council for the Middle East, North Africa, and Turkey region.

The company set up a similar council in the US in March 2020 followed by one in Asia-Pacific in September of that year, and another in Europe in March.

Bringing together experts from academia and civil society, the MENAT council will be made up of six inaugural members providing subject-matter expertise and advice on the platform’s content moderation policies and practices. They will also work with TikTok to develop safety strategies and hone its approach to safety in the region.

In a statement, the company said that the committee would be “invaluable in addressing the real challenges that impact digital wellbeing today, whilst identifying emerging issues specific to the MENAT region that affect TikTok and its community.”

Farah Tukan, head of public policy for TikTok in the Middle East, Turkey, Africa, and Pakistan, said: “This is a watershed moment, not only for TikTok but for our online communities across the region, who can be content in the knowledge that we are consistently holding ourselves accountable with peer review from industry experts.”

The six inaugural members of the safety advisory council are: Dr. Naila Hamdy, an Egyptian academic and scholar with research interests in journalism and media; Akram Karameh, a digital communications and law specialist; Dr. Hamed Alneyadi, head of corporate communications at the Institute of Applied Technology and board member at ESAFE, the Emirates Council for Work Development, and the Emirates Association for Administration; Ohaila Shomar, a human rights activist currently serving as Palestine general director for the Sawa organization; Myriam Bahri, a trained psychotherapist and strategy consultant; and Dr. Akin Unver, associate professor of international relations at Ozyegin University in Istanbul and a fellow of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Digital Democracy Network.

“We are glad to be collaborating with such esteemed experts from the ecosystem who are lending us the benefit of a wide variety of perspectives, which reflect the diverse nature of our platform and community. We look forward to maturing as a platform in a holistic and safe manner,” Tukan added.


Daily Mail delays public release of privacy breach court allegations

Daily Mail delays public release of privacy breach court allegations
Updated 21 sec ago

Daily Mail delays public release of privacy breach court allegations

Daily Mail delays public release of privacy breach court allegations
  • Lawyers acting for Prince Harry, Elton John and others claim clients were victims of ‘abhorrent criminal activity’

The Daily Mail is seeking to delay the publication of court allegations made by high-profile claimants surrounding the newspaper’s journalism practices.

The potentially damaging allegations, made by lawyers acting for Prince Harry, Doreen Lawrence, Elton John and other high-profile individuals, should have been formally acknowledged by the Daily Mail within 14 days from when they were served, automatically making their details available for public and media scrutiny, according to The Guardian.

, which also includes Sadie Frost, David Furnish and Liz Hurley, filed court cases against Associated Newspapers, the Mail’s parent company, in early October.

Lawyers representing the group said they had “compelling and highly distressing evidence” that their clients had been the “victims of abhorrent criminal activity and gross breaches of privacy” by Associated Newspapers over many years.

The lawyers claimed that the Daily Mail’s parent company misused private information, alleging that listening devices may have been placed in the homes of the celebrities.

Paul Dacre, now editor-in-chief of Associated Newspapers, told the Leveson Inquiry in 2012 while editor-in-chief of the Daily Mail that his newspaper had never engaged in illegal behavior such as phone hacking.

Dacre is speculated to be on Boris Johnson’s resignation honors list, but Labour MPs have demanded that the honor be delayed pending the outcome of the legal case.

Sources with knowledge of the case said that the paperwork setting out the allegations against the Daily Mail and its sister title is still private due to legal intervention by Associated Newspapers, which has delayed formal acknowledgment — and therefore publication — of the claims.

The allegations come despite the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday’s long record of campaigning against “secret justice” and promoting transparency in the court system. A spokespeople for the Daily Mail’s parent company did not respond to multiple requests for comment on why the company had yet to acknowledge the claims.

Associated Newspapers has been accused of hiring private investigators to secretly place listening devices inside cars and homes, commissioning individuals to surreptitiously listen in to, and record, private telephone calls, paying police officials for sensitive inside information, impersonating individuals to obtain medical information by deception, and accessing bank accounts, credit histories and financial transactions through illicit means and manipulation.

The Daily Mail previously dismissed the claims as “preposterous smears,” alleging that the legal cases consisted of “unsubstantiated and highly defamatory claims based on no credible evidence.” The paper said that the proceedings “appear to be nothing more than a pre-planned and orchestrated attempt to drag the Mail titles into the phone-hacking scandal.”

Former Liberal Democrat MP Simon Hughes is also filing proceedings against Associated Newspapers. His claims are believed to center around allegations of voicemail interception by the newspaper.

The major allegations are the first to be leveled against the Daily Mail by high-profile individuals in the wake of the phone-hacking scandal and 2011 closure of the News of the World.


Twitter exec says moving fast on moderation, as harmful content surges

A Twitter logo hangs outside the company's San Francisco offices on Nov. 1, 2022. (AP)
A Twitter logo hangs outside the company's San Francisco offices on Nov. 1, 2022. (AP)
Updated 03 December 2022

Twitter exec says moving fast on moderation, as harmful content surges

A Twitter logo hangs outside the company's San Francisco offices on Nov. 1, 2022. (AP)
  • Twitter is restricting hashtags and search results frequently associated with abuse, like those aimed at looking up “teen” pornography

SAN FRANCISCO: Elon Musk’s Twitter is leaning heavily on automation to moderate content, doing away with certain manual reviews and favoring restrictions on distribution rather than removing certain speech outright, its new head of trust and safety told Reuters.
Twitter is also more aggressively restricting abuse-prone hashtags and search results in areas including child exploitation, regardless of potential impacts on “benign uses” of those terms, said Twitter Vice President of Trust and Safety Product Ella Irwin.
“The biggest thing that’s changed is the team is fully empowered to move fast and be as aggressive as possible,” Irwin said on Thursday, in the first interview a Twitter executive has given since Musk’s acquisition of the social media company in late October.
Her comments come as researchers are reporting a surge in hate speech on the social media service, after Musk announced an amnesty for accounts suspended under the company’s previous leadership that had not broken the law or engaged in “egregious spam.”
The company has faced pointed questions about its ability and willingness to moderate harmful and illegal content since Musk slashed half of Twitter’s staff and issued an ultimatum to work long hours that resulted in the loss of hundreds more employees.
And advertisers, Twitter’s main revenue source, have fled the platform over concerns about brand safety.
On Friday, Musk vowed “significant reinforcement of content moderation and protection of freedom of speech” in a meeting with France President Emmanuel Macron.
Irwin said Musk encouraged the team to worry less about how their actions would affect user growth or revenue, saying safety was the company’s top priority. “He emphasizes that every single day, multiple times a day,” she said.
The approach to safety Irwin described at least in part reflects an acceleration of changes that were already being planned since last year around Twitter’s handling of hateful conduct and other policy violations, according to former employees familiar with that work.
One approach, captured in the industry mantra “freedom of speech, not freedom of reach,” entails leaving up certain tweets that violate the company’s policies but barring them from appearing in places like the home timeline and search.
Twitter has long deployed such “visibility filtering” tools around misinformation and had already incorporated them into its official hateful conduct policy before the Musk acquisition. The approach allows for more freewheeling speech while cutting down on the potential harms associated with viral abusive content.
The number of tweets containing hateful content on Twitter rose sharply in the week before Musk tweeted on Nov. 23 that impressions, or views, of hateful speech were declining, according to the Center for Countering Digital Hate – in one example of researchers pointing to the prevalence of such content, while Musk touts a reduction in visibility.
Tweets containing words that were anti-Black that week were triple the number seen in the month before Musk took over, while tweets containing a gay slur were up 31 percent, the researchers said.
’MORE RISKS, MOVE FAST’
Irwin, who joined the company in June and previously held safety roles at other companies including Amazon.com and Google, pushed back on suggestions that Twitter did not have the resources or willingness to protect the platform.
She said layoffs did not significantly impact full-time employees or contractors working on what the company referred to as its “Health” divisions, including in “critical areas” like child safety and content moderation.
Two sources familiar with the cuts said that more than 50 percent of the Health engineering unit was laid off. Irwin did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the assertion, but previously denied that the Health team was severely impacted by layoffs.
She added that the number of people working on child safety had not changed since the acquisition, and that the product manager for the team was still there. Irwin said Twitter backfilled some positions for people who left the company, though she declined to provide specific figures for the extent of the turnover.
She said Musk was focused on using automation more, arguing that the company had in the past erred on the side of using time- and labor-intensive human reviews of harmful content.
“He’s encouraged the team to take more risks, move fast, get the platform safe,” she said.
On child safety, for instance, Irwin said Twitter had shifted toward automatically taking down tweets reported by trusted figures with a track record of accurately flagging harmful posts.
Carolina Christofoletti, a threat intelligence researcher at TRM Labs who specializes in child sexual abuse material, said she has noticed Twitter recently taking down some content as fast as 30 seconds after she reports it, without acknowledging receipt of her report or confirmation of its decision.
In the interview on Thursday, Irwin said Twitter took down about 44,000 accounts involved in child safety violations, in collaboration with cybersecurity group Ghost Data.
Twitter is also restricting hashtags and search results frequently associated with abuse, like those aimed at looking up “teen” pornography. Past concerns about the impact of such restrictions on permitted uses of the terms were gone, she said.
The use of “trusted reporters” was “something we’ve discussed in the past at Twitter, but there was some hesitancy and frankly just some delay,” said Irwin.
“I think we now have the ability to actually move forward with things like that,” she said.

 


Hate speech on the rise on Twitter despite Elon Musk’s claims

A view of the Twitter logo at its corporate headquarters in San Francisco, California, U.S. November 18, 2022. (REUTERS)
A view of the Twitter logo at its corporate headquarters in San Francisco, California, U.S. November 18, 2022. (REUTERS)
Updated 02 December 2022

Hate speech on the rise on Twitter despite Elon Musk’s claims

A view of the Twitter logo at its corporate headquarters in San Francisco, California, U.S. November 18, 2022. (REUTERS)
  • Data from researchers reveals a sharp increase in racial slurs and other offensive terms on the platform immediately after the billionaire’s takeover of the platform
  • In the 12 days after Musk’s takeover, the Institute for Strategic Dialogue tracked 450 new Twitter accounts linked to Daesh, a 69 percent increase on the previous 12 days

DUBAI: On Nov. 4, just over a week after he completed his takeover of Twitter, billionaire Elon Musk Tweeted that the platform had “seen hateful speech at times this week decline *below* our prior norms, contrary to what you may read in the press.”

However, newly published data from several organizations suggests otherwise.

In the first 12 days following the takeover, the Institute for Strategic Dialogue tracked 450 newly created Twitter accounts linked to Daesh, a 69 percent increase compared with the previous 12 days.

Meanwhile, the Center for Countering Digital Hate said that in the week beginning Oct. 31, the first full week the platform was under the ownership of Musk, one particular racial slur appeared in tweets and retweets 26,228 times, triple the 2022 average for that slur. A derogatory term used to attack another group was mentioned in 33,926 tweets and retweets, a 53 percent increase on the 2022 average.

Musk’s takeover of Twitter has been controversial from the moment he announced it. It came as social media platforms had been under increasing scrutiny for some time over their policies on content moderation and efforts to combat hate speech.

Musk, however, describes himself as a “free speech absolutist” and said he wanted to change the way in which content is moderated on the platform. During a TED Talk in April, the same month he reached his agreement to buy Twitter, he talked about his plans for moderation and suggested he might make Twitter’s algorithm open source.

On Oct. 28, the day after his takeover was completed, he announced his plans to form “a content moderation council with widely diverse viewpoints.”

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On Nov. 4 he said: “Twitter’s strong commitment to content moderation remains absolutely unchanged.”

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But CCDH’s analysis revealed that despite early claims by Musk and Twitter’s head of trust and safety at the time, Yoel Roth, that the platform had succeeded in reducing the number of times hate speech was seen on Twitter’s search and trending pages, the actual volume of hateful tweets on the platform increased.

Before Musk bought Twitter, for example, slurs against Black Americans appeared on the platform an average of 1,282 times a day. In the days after, the number increased to 3,876 times a day, The New York Times reported. Antisemitic posts increased by more than 61 percent in the two weeks following Musk’s arrival, it added.

A separate study by the Network Contagion Research Institute found an increase of nearly 500 percent in the use of a derogatory racial term for Black people in the 12 hours immediately following the shift of ownership to Musk.

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Analysts note that an escalation in hate speech on Twitter is not only dangerous for users and society as a whole, but also represents a threat to the company itself. According to research and information center Media Matters for America, 50 of the platform’s top 100 advertisers have either announced they will no longer advertise on Twitter or have simply stopped.

Collectively, they accounted for nearly $2 billion in advertising revenue on the platform since 2020 and more than $750 million in 2022 alone.

Roth quit the company last month and later said: “I realized that even if I spent all day, every day trying to avert whatever the next disaster was, there were going to be the ones that got through.

Angelo Carusone, president of Media Matters for America, said that Musk’s Twitter is a cacophony of dictatorship, egotism and blatant disregard for the advice of experts.

If it continues, he warned, “under Musk’s leadership, Twitter will become a fever swamp of dangerous conspiracy theories, partisan chicanery and operationalized harassment.”

 

 


Twitter suspends Kanye’s account again on violating rules

Twitter suspends Kanye’s account again on violating rules
Updated 03 December 2022

Twitter suspends Kanye’s account again on violating rules

Twitter suspends Kanye’s account again on violating rules
  • Twitter owner Elon Musk had welcomed the return of the rapper, now known as Ye, to the platform in October

DUBAI: Twitter Inc. on Friday suspended Kanye West’s account again, just two months after it was reinstated, after its owner Elon Musk said he had violated the platform’s rules prohibiting incitement to violence.
Musk, who calls himself a free speech absolutist, had welcomed the return of the rapper, now known as Ye, to the platform in October.
“I tried my best. Despite that, he again violated our rule against incitement to violence. Account will be suspended,” Musk tweeted late on Thursday.
West’s account was suspended within an hour of Musk’s post, made in a reply to a Twitter user who had said “Elon Fix Kanye Please.” Twitter did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Before suspending Ye’s account, which had over 30 million followers, Twitter had restricted one of his tweets. Reuters could not independently verify the contents of the post.
The social media platform restored the rapper’s account before the completion of its $44 billion takeover by Musk. Musk later clarified that he had had no role in bringing Ye back on Twitter.
Ye on Thursday tweeted a photo of Hollywood mogul Ari Emanuel spraying water at the back of Musk’s head with a hose. He captioned the picture “Let’s always remember this as my final tweet #ye24,” before the account was suspended.
Musk responded that Ye’s account was suspended for incitement to violence, and not for posting “an unflattering pic of me being hosed by Ari.”
In November, Twitter reinstated some controversial accounts that had been banned or suspended, including satirical website Babylon Bee and comedian Kathy Griffin.
Musk also decided to reinstate former US President Donald Trump’s account after a majority of Twitter users voted in favor in a poll to bring back Trump.

 


MBC Group to expand Shahid catalog with hit anime titles

MBC Group to expand Shahid catalog with hit anime titles
Updated 02 December 2022

MBC Group to expand Shahid catalog with hit anime titles

MBC Group to expand Shahid catalog with hit anime titles
  • Group secured rights to various series, including TV Tokyo’s ‘Bleach: Thousand-Year Blood War,’ ‘Bleach’ and ‘One Piece’

LONDON: MBC Group, the Middle East and North Africa region’s leading media company, announced new partnerships on Thursday to expand the number of anime titles available on its streaming platform Shahid.

The Riyadh-based organization said in a statement it had teamed up “with key anime studios and production houses in Japan beyond to bring more anime content to its streaming platform.”

“Anime is extremely popular in the Middle East region — particularly in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia — so needless to say, we are incredibly excited to be making new additions to our ever-expanding anime catalog on Shahid, bringing new and hit titles that audiences will love exploring,” said Tareq Al-Ibrahim, director of content for subscription video on demand at Shahid.

As part of the new deals, MBC Group said it has secured exclusive rights in MENA to TV Tokyo’s “Bleach: Thousand-Year Blood War,” the 52-episode Japanese anime television series based on the “Bleach” manga series by Tite Kubo, and a direct sequel to the “Bleach” anime series.

The title, which returns after an eight-year hiatus, is available to stream on Shahid at the same time as in Japan and the US.

The group also announced the extension of the partnership with TOEI Animation, the Japanese anime studio behind the 25-year global hit manga series “One Piece.” As part of the renewed collaboration, MBC Group will air the new upcoming episodes of the series exclusively on its platform.

Following the success of the anime adaptation of “Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai” on Shahid, the media group has also expanded its partnership with its production company, Aniplex.

Under the new collaboration, fans will enjoy more than 200 hours of Aniplex content on Shahid, including “Fate/Stay Night,” “Sword Art Online,” and “Gurren Lagann.”

The move reinforces MBC Group’s commitment to expanding its anime offering, continuing to add to an already rich catalog that includes renowned titles “Hunter x Hunter,” “Legend of the Galactic Heroes,” “Belle,” as well as the Japanese–Saudi Arabian animated action fantasy film, “The Journey.”

The company said the new titles will be available to stream on Shahid by the end of the year.

The news comes at an exciting moment for the MBC Group. The company was reported last month to be working with HSBC Holdings and JPMorgan Chase & Co. to go public as early as next year.