German football legend Matthaus pleases driver left dissatisfied by Neuer’s reward

German football legend Matthaus pleases driver left dissatisfied by Neuer’s reward
German football legend Lothar Matthaus. (Shutterstock)
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Updated 23 July 2022

German football legend Matthaus pleases driver left dissatisfied by Neuer’s reward

German football legend Matthaus pleases driver left dissatisfied by Neuer’s reward
  • World Cup winner pays €1,000 for signed jersey
  • Bayern fans described Neuer’s reward as shameful

DUBAI: German football legend Lothar Matthaus stepped in on Saturday to please a disgruntled driver who was dissatisfied by Manuel Neuer’s reward for returning his wallet.
After learning about the displeasure of Albanian taxi driver Hazir S. after the run-in with Neuer, former midfielder Matthaus bought the reward, a signed Bayern Munich jersey, for €1,000 ($977) and decided to put it up for sale at a charity auction, German media reported.
Arab News previously reported that the driver was unsatisfied by Bayern goalkeeper Neuer, who gave him the signed jersey after being reunited with his forgotten wallet containing €800 and two credit cards.
Neuer had left his wallet in the taxi after he and a friend were picked up from Munich’s Odeonsplatz area.
The driver had found the wallet in the backseat when he parked to have it cleaned.
He made a 120 km ride back to Munich that cost him €400, according to media reports, with Neuer giving the driver the signed jersey in a box.
The driver told Sky Germany: “This finder’s fee is a mockery. I have four children. I can’t do anything with the jersey.”
Bild newspaper reported on Saturday that Matthaus had decided to buy the jersey and have it auctioned for charity.
“Lothar is the best! I’ve always liked him as a player. But now he’s my hero,” the driver was reported as saying.
Germany and Bayern fan Abed Majed described Neuer’s attitude as shameful.
“It is a shame what Manu did, unlike what Matthaus did. He showed the true gentleman he is. Manu should make a public statement and compensate the driver,” Majed told Arab News.
Athlete Wasim Nsoule, also a Bayern and Germany fan, said: “A happy ending for a taxi driver by legend Matthaus, West Germany’s captain and Ballon D’or winner in 1990, played the role of the savior and the driver will smile soon.”
Former Munich resident and Bayern fan Marie M. told Arab News that Neuer could have avoided that “shameful prize” and provided a valuable reward, like a jersey and two match tickets at the side’s home ground Allianz Arena.
“I’m positive that would have pleased the driver. It would please me considering the ticket prices I used to pay to watch Bayern,” she said.
Soon after his shift was over, the driver failed to reach the 2014 World Cup winner at his residence and the drop-off point before he finally got hold of Neuer’s manager and handed him the wallet.
Bild reported that the driver’s dissatisfaction was reasonable as German laws said he deserved 5 percent of the retrieved property and an additional 3 percent if it was worth over €500.
 


‘A new era’: NASA strikes asteroid in key test of planetary defense

‘A new era’: NASA strikes asteroid in key test of planetary defense
Updated 27 September 2022

‘A new era’: NASA strikes asteroid in key test of planetary defense

‘A new era’: NASA strikes asteroid in key test of planetary defense
  • DART’s celestial target is an asteroid “moonlet” about 560 feet (170 meters) in diameter that orbits a parent asteroid five times larger called Didymos as part of a binary pair with the same name, the Greek word for twin

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida: A NASA spaceship on Monday struck an asteroid seven million miles away in order to deflect its orbit, succeeding in a historic test of humanity’s ability to prevent a celestial object from devastating life on Earth.

The Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) impactor hit its target, the space rock Dimorphos, at 7:14 p.m. Eastern Time (2314 GMT), 10 months after blasting off from California on its pioneering mission.

“We’re embarking on a new era, an era in which we potentially have the capability to protect ourselves from something like a dangerous hazardous asteroid impact,” said Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s planetary science division.

Dimorphos — a 530-foot (160-meter) asteroid roughly comparable in size to an Egyptian pyramid — orbits a half-mile long big brother called Didymos. Never seen before, the “moonlet” appeared as a speck of light around an hour before the collision.

Its egg-like shape and craggy, boulder-dotted surface finally came into clear view in the last few minutes, as DART raced toward it at roughly 14,500 miles (23,500 kilometers) per hour.

NASA scientists and engineers erupted in applause as the screen froze on a final image, indicating that signal had been lost and impact had taken place.

To be sure, the pair of asteroids pose no threat to our planet as they loop the Sun every two of our years.

But NASA has deemed the experiment important to carry out before an actual need is discovered.

By striking Dimorphos head on, NASA hopes to push it into a smaller orbit, shaving 10 minutes off the time it takes to encircle Didymos, which is currently 11 hours and 55 minutes.

Ground telescopes — which can’t see the asteroid system directly but can detect a shift in patterns of light coming from it — should provide a definitive orbital period in the coming days and weeks.

The proof-of-concept has made a reality of what has before only been attempted in science fiction — notably in films such as “Armageddon” and “Don’t Look Up.”

Minutes after impact, a toaster-sized satellite called LICIACube, which already separated from DART a few weeks ago, was expected to make a close pass of the site to capture images of the collision and the ejecta — the pulverized rock thrown off by the strike.

LICIACube’s pictures will be sent back in the next weeks and months.

Also watching the event: an array of telescopes, both on Earth and in space — including the recently operational James Webb — which might be able to see a brightening cloud of dust.

The mission has set the global astronomy community abuzz, with more than three dozen ground telescopes participating, including optical, radio and radar.

“There’s a lot of them, and it’s incredibly exciting to have lost count,” said DART mission planetary astronomer Christina Thomas.

Finally, a full picture of what the system looks like will be revealed when a European Space Agency mission four years down the line called Hera arrives to survey Dimorphos’ surface and measure its mass, which scientists can currently only guess at.

Very few of the billions of asteroids and comets in our solar system are considered potentially hazardous to our planet, and none are expected in the next hundred years or so.

But wait long enough, and it will happen.

We know that from the geological record — for example, the six-mile wide Chicxulub asteroid struck Earth 66 million years ago, plunging the world into a long winter that led to the mass extinction of the dinosaurs along with 75 percent of all species.

An asteroid the size of Dimorphos, by contrast, would only cause a regional impact, such as devastating a city, albeit with greater force than any nuclear bomb in history.

How much momentum DART imparts on Dimorphos will depend on whether the asteroid is solid rock, or more like a “rubbish pile” of boulders bound by mutual gravity — a property that’s not yet known.

If it had missed, NASA would have another shot in two years’ time, with the spaceship containing just enough fuel for another pass.

But its success marks the first step toward a world capable of defending itself from a future existential threat.

“I think Earthlings can sleep better, definitely I will,” said DART mission systems engineer Elena Adams.


Google celebrates Saudi National Day with Doodle

Google celebrates Saudi National Day with Doodle
Updated 23 September 2022

Google celebrates Saudi National Day with Doodle

Google celebrates Saudi National Day with Doodle
  • Doodle marks the Kingdom’s 92nd national day

LONDON: Google has joined Saudi Arabia in the celebrating of its national day with one of its famous Google Doodles, with an image of the Kingdom’s flag on the search engine’s homepage on Friday.

Only visible in Saudi Arabia, the doodle marks the Kingdom’s 92nd national day – known in Arabic as Al-Yaom-ul-Watany.

It was in 1932 that a royal decree was signed calling for the unification of the dual Kingdom of Nejd and Hejaz under the name of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

The Google doodle features the Kingdom’s green flag which was adopted in 1973.


Outspoken Myanmar beauty queen held by Thai immigration

Outspoken Myanmar beauty queen held by Thai immigration
Updated 23 September 2022

Outspoken Myanmar beauty queen held by Thai immigration

Outspoken Myanmar beauty queen held by Thai immigration
  • Han Lay has been held at Bangkok's main international airport since Thursday after arriving on a flight from Vietnam
  • In a post on her verified Facebook page on Friday, Han Lay said she feared the Myanmar police would come and get her at the airport

BANGKOK: A Myanmar beauty queen who spoke out against the military coup in her homeland appealed Friday for help after being refused entry to Thailand by immigration officials.
Thaw Nandar Aung, better known by her professional moniker Han Lay, has been held at Bangkok’s main international airport since Thursday after arriving on a flight from Vietnam.
She made headlines in March 2021 when she urged the world to “save” the people of Myanmar from the military, which had seized power a month earlier.
Thai immigration officials said she was denied entry to the kingdom because of a problem with her passport.
In a post on her verified Facebook page on Friday, Han Lay said she feared the Myanmar police would come and get her at the airport.
“I request to Thai authority from here please help for me,” she wrote in English, adding that she had contacted the UN refugee agency.
A Thai official told AFP that Myanmar police had not spoken to her and said it was up to her to decide where to fly to from Bangkok.
While in Bangkok competing in the Miss Grand International contest, the former psychology student spoke out against the coup, which ousted the civilian government led by Aung San Suu Kyi.
“I want to say from here to the world: please support the Myanmar people,” she told Thailand’s Khaosod English news outlet.
“So many people die in Myanmar by the guns of the military... Please save us.”
Myanmar has been in chaos since the coup, with the junta struggling to quell resistance to its rule.
A military crackdown on dissent has left more than 2,300 civilians dead, according to a local monitoring group.
The junta puts the civilian death toll at almost 3,900.


Israeli researchers find opium residue in 3,500-year-old pottery

Israeli researchers find opium residue in 3,500-year-old pottery
Updated 20 September 2022

Israeli researchers find opium residue in 3,500-year-old pottery

Israeli researchers find opium residue in 3,500-year-old pottery
  • The joint investigation by the Israel Antiquities Authority and Weizmann Institute of Science began in 2012
  • Researchers found pottery vessels at the site that resembled poppy flowers dating back to the 14th century BC

YEHUD, Israel: Israeli archaeologists said Tuesday they had discovered opium residue in 3,500-year-old pottery pieces, providing evidence to support the theory that the hallucinogenic drug was used in ancient burial rituals.
The joint investigation by the Israel Antiquities Authority and Weizmann Institute of Science began in 2012 when excavations in the central Israeli town of Yehud revealed a series of Late Bronze Age graves.
Researchers found pottery vessels at the site that resembled poppy flowers — from which opium is derived — dating back to the 14th century BC.
They then examined whether they had served as containers for the drug, which earlier writing had suggested was used in burial rituals in Canaan, and found “opium residue in eight vessels,” the researchers said in a statement.
These were likely “placed in graves for ceremonial meals, rites and rituals performed by the living for their deceased family members,” said Ron Be’eri, an archaeologist with the antiquities authority.
During these ceremonies, “family members or a priest on their behalf” would “attempt to summon the spirit of their dead relatives... and enter an ecstatic state by using opium,” Be’eri said.
But he acknowledged that much remained unknown about its use in ancient times. “We can only speculate what was done with opium,” he said.


NASA’s InSight lander detects space rocks as they slam into Mars

NASA’s InSight lander detects space rocks as they slam into Mars
Updated 20 September 2022

NASA’s InSight lander detects space rocks as they slam into Mars

NASA’s InSight lander detects space rocks as they slam into Mars

WASHINGTON: Mars, by virtue of its tenuous atmosphere and proximity to our solar system’s asteroid belt, is far more vulnerable than Earth to being struck by space rocks — one of the many differences between the two planetary neighbors.
Scientists are now gaining a fuller understanding of this Martian trait, with help from NASA’s robotic InSight lander. Researchers on Monday described how InSight detected seismic and acoustic waves from the impact of four meteorites and then calculated the location of the craters they left — the first such measurements anywhere other than Earth.
The researchers used observations from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in space to confirm the crater locations.
“These seismic measurements give us a completely new tool for investigating Mars, or any other planet we can land a seismometer on,” said planetary geophysicist Bruce Banerdt of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the InSight mission’s principal investigator.
The space rocks InSight tracked — one landing in 2020 and the other three in 2021 — were relatively modest in size, estimated to weigh up to about 440 pounds (200 kg), with diameters of up to about 20 inches (50 cm) and leaving craters of up to about 24 feet (7.2 meters) wide. They landed between 53 miles (85 km) and 180 miles (290 km) from InSight’s location. One exploded into at least three pieces that each gouged their own craters.
“We can connect a known source type, location and size to what the seismic signal looks like. We can apply this information to better understand InSight’s entire catalog of seismic events, and use the results on other planets and moons, too,” said Brown University planetary scientist Ingrid Daubar, a co-author of the study published in the journal Nature Geoscience https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-022-01014-0.
The researchers believe that now the seismic signature of such impacts has been discovered they expect to find more contained in InSight’s data, going back to 2018.
The three-legged InSight — its name is short for Interior Exploration Using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport — landed in 2018 in a vast and relatively flat plain just north of the Martian equator called Elysium Planitia.
“The moon is also a target for future meteor impact detection,” said planetary scientist and study lead author Raphael Garcia of the University of Toulouse’s ISAE-SUPAERO institute of aeronautics and space.
“And it may be the same sensors will do it, because the spare sensors of InSight are currently integrated in the Farside Seismic Suite instrument for a flight to the moon in 2025,” Garcia added, referring to an instrument due to be placed near the lunar south pole on the side of the moon permanently facing away from Earth.
Mars is about twice as likely as Earth to have its atmosphere hit by a meteoroid — the name for a space rock before it strikes the surface. However, Earth has a much thicker atmosphere that protects the planet.
“So meteoroids usually break up and disintegrate in the Earth’s atmosphere, forming fireballs that only rarely reach the surface to form a crater. In comparison on Mars, hundreds of impact craters are forming somewhere on the planet’s surface every year,” Daubar said.
The Martian atmosphere is only about 1 percent as thick as Earth’s. The asteroid belt, an abundant source of space rocks, is located between Mars and Jupiter.
The scientific goals set for InSight ahead of the mission were to investigate the internal structure and processes of Mars, as well as studying seismic activity and meteorite impacts.
InSight’s seismometer instrument established that Mars is seismically active, detecting more than 1,300 marsquakes. In research published last year, seismic waves detected by InSight helped decipher the internal structure of Mars, including the first estimates of the size of its large liquid metal core, thickness of its crust, and nature of its mantle.