Archeologists discover 4,500-year-old temple in Egypt

Archeologists discover 4,500-year-old temple in Egypt
The mud-brick building’s ruins are thought to be one of ancient Egypt's lost “sun temples” from the Fifth Dynasty. (Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities and Tourism)
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Updated 31 July 2022

Archeologists discover 4,500-year-old temple in Egypt

Archeologists discover 4,500-year-old temple in Egypt
  • Pots and beer glasses will aid team in their research

LONDON: Archeologists in Egypt have discovered a 4,500-year-old temple, according to a report in Metro.

The mud-brick building’s ruins are thought to be one of ancient Egypt's lost “sun temples” from the Fifth Dynasty, 2465 to 2323 B.C.

They were discovered during an Italian-Polish archaeological mission in the Abusir region, south of Cairo, beneath King Niuserre's temple.

On Saturday, the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities and Tourism announced the discovery on Instagram.

“The joint Italian-Polish archaeological mission, working at the temple of King Niuserre in Abu Ghorab, north of Abu Sir, discovered the remains of a mud-brick building below the temple. The discovery hints that the remains might belong to one of the lost four solar temples from the Fifth Dynasty, known only in historical sources but yet to have been found thus far,” it said.

According to the ministry, the pharaoh - the sixth ruler of the Fifth Dynasty during the Old Kingdom period - demolished part of the structure to build his temple.

The team discovered several pots and beer glasses that will aid their research.

Muddy stamps bearing the names of Fifth Dynasty kings were also discovered, and photos shared by the ministry showed the site where archeologists were still working.

The first sun temple dedicated to the god Ra was discovered in the 19th century, so the latest find is significant as it could help scientists’ understanding of ancient Egyptian history.

Only two of Egypt's six or seven such temples have been discovered to date.


Italian photographer’s ‘The Kid of Mosul’ wins top prize at iPhone Awards

Italian photographer’s ‘The Kid of Mosul’ wins top prize at iPhone Awards
Updated 11 August 2022

Italian photographer’s ‘The Kid of Mosul’ wins top prize at iPhone Awards

Italian photographer’s ‘The Kid of Mosul’ wins top prize at iPhone Awards

DUBAI: The iPhone Photography Awards (IPPAWARDS) has announced the winners of its 15th annual edition, with Italy's Antonio Denti taking this year's Grand Prize for his pensive image, “The Kid of Mosul.”

“Chosen from thousands of submissions from all over the world, many of this year’s winning shots depict beauty rising out of isolation and honor photography’s ability to build bridges across lost connections,” read an announcement on the official website.

Denti received the Photographer of the Year Award for his photo depicting a soldier cupping the face of a young boy in his hands, which the organization described as “a moment of tenderness in the dusty rubble of war.”

‘Old Soul’ by Egyptian artist Reem Borhanwon third place in the Still Life category. (IPPAWARDS)

From the region, Egypt's Reem Borhan won third place in the Still Life category with her photo titled “Old Soul.”

Meanwhile, the First Place Photographer of the Year Award went to Rachel Sela of Sweden for her image, “Anti-Social Distancing,” which turns masking up into an act of theater.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by IPPAWARDS (@ippawards)

Kelley Dallas of the US won Second Place for his image “Girl with the Violin.” And Third Place went to Glenn Homann of Australia for his photo, “Wasted.”

Kelley Dallas of the US won Second Place for his image ‘Girl with the Violin.’ (IPPAWARDS)

Top-three winners in an additional 16 categories were awarded to photographers from almost every corner of the world, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Greece, India, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, San Marino, Poland, United Kingdom, United States.


Bollywood superstar Aamir Khan thanks Mideast fans while promoting adaption of Hollywood’s ‘Forrest Gump’ 

Bollywood superstar Aamir Khan thanks Mideast fans while promoting adaption of Hollywood’s ‘Forrest Gump’ 
Updated 11 August 2022

Bollywood superstar Aamir Khan thanks Mideast fans while promoting adaption of Hollywood’s ‘Forrest Gump’ 

Bollywood superstar Aamir Khan thanks Mideast fans while promoting adaption of Hollywood’s ‘Forrest Gump’ 

LOS ANGELES: Bollywood star and producer Aamir Khan spoke about India’s connection with the Middle East while promoting his latest film, “Laal Singh Chaddha,” which was released on Thursday in the region. 

The movie, which is an adaption of the Hollywood classic “Forrest Gump,” tells the story of Laal, a purehearted and intellectually disabled man who lives through pivotal moments in India’s history.

Despite making the film for Indian audiences, Aamir told Arab News that he is glad to see viewers from far and wide gravitating toward it, including those in the Arab world.

“I think Indians have a closer emotional key to the Arab world and to the Middle East,” he said. “I would like to tell all my fans across the Middle East that I want to thank them for all the love they've always given me and my work.”

The actor said: “If someone had asked me: ‘would you like to do “Forrest Gump?”’ I would have thought he was joking.”

The film reinterprets “Forrest Gump’s” iconic moments to reflect Indian culture, including exchanging the box of chocolates on the bus stop for gol gappe during a train ride.

“It kind of spans 50 years,” Khan told Arab News. “So you have the characters in the 70s, 80s, 90s, and then in 2000.  And so every department, whether it's the production design, whether it's the look of the film, the costumes, everything has to change according to that time.” 

“So it's a very preparation-heavy film and really a challenging film, but great fun to do as well,” he added.

The film stars Bollywood actress Kareena Kapoor, who plays the role of Chaddha’s childhood love. 

The film also sees superstar Shah Rukh Khan in a cameo appearance. 


Dubai exhibition highlights Palestinian artist Rana Samara’s latest work

Dubai exhibition highlights Palestinian artist Rana Samara’s latest work
Updated 11 August 2022

Dubai exhibition highlights Palestinian artist Rana Samara’s latest work

Dubai exhibition highlights Palestinian artist Rana Samara’s latest work
  • Rana Samara’s ‘Inner Sanctuary’ runs until August 28 at Dubai’s Zawyeh Gallery

DUBAI: From drawings of empty rooms to presenting human figures, Palestinian artist Rana Samara’s “Inner Sanctuary,” which runs until Aug. 28 at Dubai’s Zawyeh Gallery, focuses on the artist’s conception of her own intimate space from an emotional perspective.

‘Untitled 2’

Jerusalem-born artist Rana Samara’s latest show “portrays an inner sanctuary visually and sentimentally,” critic and journalist Rana Anani writes in the exhibition brochure. Not all the images are comforting though. This painting of a hospital bed, Anani points out, “bears an unsettling feeling.” “The scattered red tubes on the surface of the colorful floors reflect commotion as if there was an emergency scene,” she writes.

‘Untitled 44’

“Samara uses colors, motifs, and shapes to convey her sentiments showing her content, calmness, anxiety, or frustration,” Anani explains. It’s surprising just how much emotion Samara packs into these empty rooms. This bedroom, with peacock features in the background, for example, “gives a feeling of lightness, weightlessness, and a connection with the skies.”

‘Untitled 43’

This is one of the rare occasions that Samara’s work includes a human figure — this contemplative woman. Her usual omission of humans, Anani suggests, “could be a way to capture moments that people leave behind” or “an attempt at emancipation from the restraints imposed by their presence and an opportunity to reveal concealed feelings, whether joyful or gloomy.”  


Madinah art community Thalothya supports Saudi Arabia-based artists

Madinah art community Thalothya supports Saudi Arabia-based artists
Updated 11 August 2022

Madinah art community Thalothya supports Saudi Arabia-based artists

Madinah art community Thalothya supports Saudi Arabia-based artists
  • Artist Meshal Al-Hujaili launched a community project of talks called Thalothya to support artists by educating them on other parts of their careers
  • Al-Hujaili began his journey in the art world at a young age by drawing graffiti before taking another direction

RIYADH: The artist’s main focus is on the aesthetic aspect of life, leaving material concerns behind, leaving many artists struggling to understand the economic world, sparking confusion over pricing their paintings and profiting from their talents.

This was one of the reasons that artist Meshal Al-Hujaili was inspired to launch a community project of talks called “Thalothya” to support artists by educating them on more parts of their careers.

Thalothya emerged as an artistic community concerned with spreading artistic culture, enhancing the creative side of the artists, and exchanging experiences.

Their goal is to create a healthy artistic environment in which practitioners find support and expertise to develop their art. The sessions are held once a month in Madinah.

The group also organizes monthly dialogue sessions, regular presentations on the artists’ latest works, online interviews with an eclectic range of influential artists, and discussions on the journey that each artist took and its impact on their craft.

“Thalothya started in an informal way between me and my artist friends, and I decided to set up a meeting to discuss art. Then I was surprised that the topic started to spread among artists and that a large number wanted to attend courses. The news spread in the city. We started with 15 people, and the last session was attended by 60 artists,” Al-Hujaili told Arab News.

Al-Hujaili said that because of the crowds of people who wanted to attend the event, the sessions were moved from a cafe to art galleries in Madinah, where there are halls to accommodate 200 people in the session.

“Many people want to join the discussion circles, which is why I refuse the requests of many cafes and places that want to host us because I know that the place will not accommodate us,” said Al-Hujaili, adding: “Thalothya created an artistic revolution in Madinah.”

He said: “The topics we raise are not purely artistic, so we talk about the legal aspect of art, and 90 percent of artists do not know how to legally preserve their works or price their works. We help them to dialogue and talk in a safe space and host different topics each time. 

“For example, we once discussed the subject of ‘art block’ during our research, and we found a definition that is completely different from what we thought, and we present a new aspect that focuses on the topic of marketing and the problems that the artist goes through, why an artist appears and becomes famous suddenly, and then he is isolated and disappears.”

Al-Hujaili’s paintings are distinguished by geometric formations. He began his journey in the art world at a young age by drawing graffiti before taking another direction.

“I started my graffiti from primary to secondary school, and I drew graffiti, then art took a new curve. For six years, I only drew straight lines and worked on drawing geometric shapes, and the result was special, as I was unique in my art, in which I put my fingerprint. I was requested to paint a mural at the Arab Open University in Madinah,” he said.

The dialogues were not limited to male artists, with women making up a large share of the discussion.

Basma Al-Bloshi, a portrait artist, said: “What distinguishes Thalothya is that it cares about the artist’s aspects, both psychologically and practically, and we discuss the things that develop the artist.”

She continued: “The idea of Thalothya is to educate the artist about other aspects of art. One of our goals is to spread Thakothya throughout the Kingdom.”


Palestinian-American comedian Mo Amer releases trailer for Netflix’s ‘Mo’ 

Palestinian-American comedian Mo Amer releases trailer for Netflix’s ‘Mo’ 
Updated 10 August 2022

Palestinian-American comedian Mo Amer releases trailer for Netflix’s ‘Mo’ 

Palestinian-American comedian Mo Amer releases trailer for Netflix’s ‘Mo’ 

DUBAI: Palestinian-American comedian Mo Amer released on Tuesday the trailer to his upcoming Netflix show “Mo.” 

The eight-episode series, which will be released on Aug. 24, centers on a Palestinian immigrant family living in Houston, Texas. It follows Mo Najjar, played by Amer, who straddles the line between two cultures, three languages and a pending asylum request, all while hustling to support his family, which includes his mother, sister and older brother. 

Jordanian-Kuwaiti-Palestinian actress Farah Bsieso stars as Mo’s mother Yusra Najjar, while Egyptian-American actor Omar Elba portrays Sameer Najjar, Mo’s older brother, who has social anxiety. 

Rapper Tobe Nwigwe plays Nick, Mo’s oldest, most loyal friend and Mexican-American actress Teresa Ruiz stars as Mo’s girlfriend Maria. 

Amer also serves as executive producer in the series, along with his “Ramy” co-star and friend Egyptian-American Golden Globe-winner Ramy Youssef, who also appears in the show. 

In December, Amer told Arab News that he is at a point in his career where he is able to share his stories with a wider audience than ever before through an artistic medium that allows viewers to experience both his perspective and that of the Palestinian people in an intimate way.

“That’s why I think the art of stand-up is so liberating. It’s never been about the money,” he said. “Making money is great, and I want to make what I can, but it’s about telling great stories. I’m less concerned about money, and more concerned about punching above my weight. Creating a masterpiece is a worthy trek. That’s how I feel. That’s where I’m at right now with my stand-up, and my TV show.”

Amer began his career in comedy in his early teens and soon discovered that no one was telling stories about his experience or that of Arabs in general.

“I first got on stage at 14 years old, and I started touring when I was 17. Immediately, I started noticing that there was this huge gap,” he said. “There was no real representation at all on any of those stages of Arabs or Muslims. I said to myself, ‘OK, why don’t I introduce it?’”

With “Mo,” “Mo Amer: Mohammed in Texas,” “Mo Amer: The Vagabond” and “Ramy,” the comedian has and still is sharing the stories of both his family and his people.