Myriam Fares joins forces with Nicki Minaj, Maluma for World Cup song 

Lebanese singer Myriam Fares has joined forces with US rapper Nicki Minaj and Colombian singer Maluma for a new FIFA World Cup song. (Screenshot)
Lebanese singer Myriam Fares has joined forces with US rapper Nicki Minaj and Colombian singer Maluma for a new FIFA World Cup song. (Screenshot)
Short Url
Updated 22 November 2022

Myriam Fares joins forces with Nicki Minaj, Maluma for World Cup song 

Myriam Fares joins forces with Nicki Minaj, Maluma for World Cup song 
  • “Tukoh Taka” makes history as the first World Cup song to feature Arabic, English and Spanish lyrics

DUBAI: Lebanese singer Myriam Fares has joined forces with US rapper Nicki Minaj and Colombian singer Maluma for a new FIFA World Cup song. 

The track, “Tukoh Taka,” makes history as the first World Cup song to feature Arabic, English and Spanish lyrics. It was released on Friday on Universal Arabic Music, Universal Music Group and Republic Records. 

In the song, Fares sings in the Lebanese and Khaleeji dialects. 

Fares and Maluma will perform together at the opening of the FIFA Fan Festival at Al-Bidda Park in Qatar on Nov. 19.

“The preparations are in progress to perform the biggest concert in the Arab region for the opening of the FIFA Fan Festival… Be ready to witness this huge event,” Fares wrote on Instagram. 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Myriam Fares (@myriamfares)


Dior Men presents Celestial collection in Cairo  

Dior Men presents Celestial collection in Cairo  
The showcase was set against the majestic backdrop of Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza. (AFP)
Updated 54 min 38 sec ago

Dior Men presents Celestial collection in Cairo  

Dior Men presents Celestial collection in Cairo  

DUBAI: Hollywood star and Dior global ambassador Robert Pattinson was on the front row as the label presented its Celestial collection on Saturday, set against the majestic backdrop of Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Dior Official (@dior)

Kim Jones, the creative director of Dior Men, had 75 models present new looks from the French fashion house. 

Other famous faces spotted at the event included South Korean rapper Sehun, South Korean singer, actor and model Cha Eun-woo, Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton, Scottish actor Thomas Doherty and British supermodel Naomi Campbell. 

The show took place in front of the Pyramids of Giza. (AFP)

Stars from the Middle East included Tunisian actor and filmmaker Dhafer L’Abidine, Egyptian actor Amr Youssef and Egyptian Canadian “Aladdin” actor Mena Massoud. 

A model hits the runway in Dior Men's latest collection. (AFP)

 


Actresses Tara Emad, Ruba Zarour shine at Red Sea premiere of ‘All Roads Lead to Rome’

Actresses Tara Emad, Ruba Zarour shine at Red Sea premiere of ‘All Roads Lead to Rome’
Updated 04 December 2022

Actresses Tara Emad, Ruba Zarour shine at Red Sea premiere of ‘All Roads Lead to Rome’

Actresses Tara Emad, Ruba Zarour shine at Red Sea premiere of ‘All Roads Lead to Rome’

JEDDAH: Egyptian Montenegrin actress Tara Emad and Lebanese American actress Ruba Zarour took over the red carpet ahead of the screening of Lebanese filmmaker Lara Saba’s “All Roads Lead to Rome,” at the Red Sea International Film Festival in Jeddah. 

Styled by Cedric Haddad, Emad wore a glittering embellished jumpsuit by Lebanese couturier Elie Saab, paired with jewelry by Cartier. 

Zarour, the leading lady of “All Roads Lead To Rome,” wore a stylish jacket dress from French luxury fashion house Chanel. 

Also attending the screening was popular Egyptian actress-singer Bushra Rozza, wearing a pearlescent green suit from Dubai-based label Lili Blanc, founded by Lebanese designer Sabrina Mouhiedin. 

Ruba Zarour, the leading lady of “All Roads Lead To Rome,” wore a stylish jacket dress from French luxury fashion house Chanel. (Getty Images) 

After the screening, Emad took to Instagram Stories to congratulate Zarour on her performance. “You’re a star. Mabrook @rubazarour. Truly enjoyed this light-hearted and beautiful film. Congrats to the whole incredibly talented cast.” 

The film, produced by Lara and Chadi Haddad, tells the story of Hady (played by Haddad), a famous actor who is shortlisted for the role of the young pope in an international production. 

In preparation for the role, he escapes his hectic life to Qannoubin, where four nuns and a young woman lead him to undergo a transformation. 

The romantic comedy also stars Julia Kassar, Betty Taoutel, Myrna Moukarzel and Cynthia Karam. 

Meanwhile, Saudi actress Fay Fouad attended the screening of “Sattar” and “Hanging Gardens” on Saturday. Also at the star-studded red carpet was Bollywood superstar Akshay Kumar, who also took part in an In Conversation segment at the film festival on Saturday. 

Saudi actress Khairiah Abulaban was also spotted on the red carpet ahead of the two screenings. 

Adding to the jam-packed day, Lebanese actor, director and writer Nadine Labaki — who enjoyed breakout success with Oscar-nominated and Cannes Jury Prize-winning third feature “Capernaum” in 2018 — was presented with the Variety International Filmmaker Vanguard award as she addressed the audience in an hour-long In Conversation panel. 

The Red Sea International Film Festival runs until Dec. 10. 


Gurinder Chadha says ‘Bend It Like Beckham’ was about racism at RSIFF 2022

Gurinder Chadha says ‘Bend It Like Beckham’ was about racism at RSIFF 2022
Updated 04 December 2022

Gurinder Chadha says ‘Bend It Like Beckham’ was about racism at RSIFF 2022

Gurinder Chadha says ‘Bend It Like Beckham’ was about racism at RSIFF 2022

JEDDAH: British Indian filmmaker Gurinder Chadha -- known largely for her commercial, feel-good films -- took part in an hour-long 'In Conversation' panel at the Red Sea International Film Festival in Jeddah, where she talked about one of her most popular early films, "Bend It Like Beckham."

The sports comedy film, released in 2002, starred Keira Knightley and Parminder Nagra in lead roles.

“It’s about racism,” the director said of the film. “It’s dressed up as a comedy but it’s actually about parents protecting children from racism. But if I had gone out and said this was a film about racism, it would have never got financed, never!”

She also bemoaned the fact that there aren't more successful  British Indian filmmakers in the industry. 

When asked if she suffered from tokenism in the U.K. as a British Indian director, Chadha said: “I think the opposite because I’ve been the only one for many years. I think it’s a shameful statistic and people are trying to change that. I was the first Indian woman to make a feature in Britain [1994’s ‘Bhaji on the Beach’] and, until this day, there are only one or two [British-Indian directors in Britain]. I’m a reminder of the fact that things need to change.”

Speaking about the experience of visiting Saudi Arabia, she said: “In Britain, we have a different view of what Saudi Arabia is. Everything here is geared towards families, everything is about family life and kids, and you don’t get those impressions in Britain.

“It’s a country that’s changing. For some people, it’s changing too fast, and for some people, it’s not changing enough. I’m really interested in those discussions right now. The work that I do is very much focused on the fact that people will change,” continued the filmmaker. “It’s interesting to see those discussions in Saudi cinema, and to see how people negotiate change. I hope it’s not seen as a negative thing.”


US director Oliver Stone explores Saudi film scene at Red Sea International Film Festival  

US director Oliver Stone explores Saudi film scene at Red Sea International Film Festival  
Updated 03 December 2022

US director Oliver Stone explores Saudi film scene at Red Sea International Film Festival  

US director Oliver Stone explores Saudi film scene at Red Sea International Film Festival  

JEDDAH: Lauded US director Oliver Stone took part in a roundtable discussion at the ongoing Red Sea International Film Festival in Saudi Arabia on Saturday.  

When asked by Arab News if he would consider filming in Saudi Arabia, he said: “My time is limited, I’m 76 years old. What do you want me to do, come down here and learn a whole different culture? No, I don’t think that’s possible. I have one project in mind, which I can’t tell you because nobody knows about it and if I can get that done, I would be very happy.” 

 

 

“The Middle East has tremendous potential, economically too. People are putting money here, no question,” he added.  

When commenting on film’s ability to act as a cultural bridge, he said “I imagine cinema has played a huge role, but on the other hand cinema is also very violent and revenge-motivated — those stories always seem to work — so you could say that’s not a good example for the world… so it’s double-edged, it depends on the movie.” 

 

 

Stone’s latest documentary “Nuclear” is screening at the festival on Sunday.  

Prior to his private discussion, the “Scarface” director and RSIFF jury president took to the stage at the opening ceremony of the festival on Thursday to share his views on Saudi Arabia.  

Stone said the country is “much misunderstood in the present world – people who have judged too harshly should come and visit to see for themselves.” He also noted “changes” and “reforms” taking place in the Kingdom, which he said make it worth a visit.  

Commenting on the 15-strong competition slate, the Oscar-winning director said: “These films stick to very basic ideas of survival, migration, suffering. There’s a real spirit here, which is growing,” according to Variety.  

The event will continue until Dec. 10 under the slogan “Film is Everything.”  

The festival is set to showcase 131 feature films and shorts from 61 countries, in 41 languages, made by established and emerging talents. Seven feature films and 24 shorts from Saudi Arabia will also be shown. 


Review: Red Sea title ‘Shimoni’ is both devastating and meaningful  

Review: Red Sea title ‘Shimoni’ is both devastating and meaningful  
Updated 03 December 2022

Review: Red Sea title ‘Shimoni’ is both devastating and meaningful  

Review: Red Sea title ‘Shimoni’ is both devastating and meaningful  

JEDDAH: “Shimoni (The Pit)” — part of the ongoing Red Sea International Film Festival — was written and directed with a lot of feeling by Kenya’s Angela Wamai. It is a devastating look at what happens when a community fails to care for a fallen man. Wamai's ability to tell a story through long silences add to the tension, aided by some wonderfully neat editing. The use of light and shade to take us through the moods of the moment to create a fantastic feeling, and our hearts go out to Geoffrey (Justin Mirichii), who suffers through a childhood trauma and a punishingly long jail term.  

Wamai's writing presents an authentic picture of this deeply religious churchgoing village, where the pastor's word is the law. (Supplied)

Released from prison seven years after being charged with homicide, Geoffrey shudders when he is asked to live in the village where he grew up and where horrifying memories torment him. Once a brilliant English teacher, the former convict is uneasy when he is asked to do farm work. His boss is a talkative woman, Martha (Muthoni Gathecha), who is displeased with him.  

The village priest has his own agenda — he wants Geoffrey to repent for his sins and gives the fallen man a sermon every night. But when the pastor insists that the young man meet with the victim's family, the uneasiness is excruciating.   

What ultimately proves to be a tipping point is when village gossip becomes unbearable for him. Beatrice (Vivian Wambui), just about to get out of her teen years, is another source of irritation for him, when her curiosity pushes her to play with fire. 

Wamai's writing presents an authentic picture of this deeply religious churchgoing village, where the pastor's word is the law. The only person who appears outside this circle is Martha, who loves playing the sleuth. Interestingly, the script offers a lovely view of the relationship between her and Geoffrey — their meetings are both tense and witty and the movie, set in the Kenyan countryside, goes to underline the trauma of an individual when he has had a run in with the law.