What We Are Reading Today: Yuan: Chinese Architecture in Mongol Empire

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Updated 02 December 2023
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What We Are Reading Today: Yuan: Chinese Architecture in Mongol Empire

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  • “Yuan” presents the first comprehensive study in English of the architecture of China under Mongol rule

Author: Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt

The Yuan dynasty endured for a century, leaving behind an architectural legacy without equal, from palaces, temples, and pagodas to pavilions, tombs, and stages.
With a history enlivened by the likes of Kublai Khan and Marco Polo, this spectacular empire spanned the breadth of China and far, far beyond, but its rulers were Mongols.
“Yuan” presents the first comprehensive study in English of the architecture of China under Mongol rule.
Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt looks at cities such as the legendary Shangdu as well as the architecture the Mongols encountered on their routes of conquest.
She examines the buildings and monuments of diverse faiths in China during the period, from Buddhist and Daoist to Confucian, Islamic, and Christian, as well as unusual structures. Steinhardt dispels long-standing views of the Mongols as destroyers of cities and architecture across Asia, showing how the khans and their families built more than they tore down.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Try to Love the Questions

What We Are Reading Today: Try to Love the Questions
Updated 25 February 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: Try to Love the Questions

What We Are Reading Today: Try to Love the Questions

Author: Lara Schwartz 

“Try to Love the Questions” gives college students a framework for understanding and practicing dialogue across difference in and out of the classroom.

This invaluable guide explores the challenges facing students as they prepare to listen, speak, and learn in a college community and encourages students and faculty alike to consider inclusive, respectful communication as a skill—not as a limitation on freedom.

Among the most common challenges on college campuses today is figuring out how to navigate our politically charged culture and engage productively with opposing viewpoints.


What We’re Reading: Fluke

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Updated 24 February 2024
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What We’re Reading: Fluke

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Author: Brian Klaas

In “Fluke,” Brian Klaas dives deeply into the phenomenon of random chance and the chaos it can sow, taking aim at most people’s neat and tidy storybook version of reality.

The book’s argument is that we willfully ignore a bewildering but for a few small changes, our lives could be radically different. Drawing on social science, chaos theory, history, evolutionary biology, and philosophy, Klaas provides a fresh look at why things happen — all while providing mind-bending lessons on how we can live smarter, be happier, and lead more fulfilling lives.

 


What We Are Reading Today: ‘The Princeton Field Guide to Pterosaurs’

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Updated 24 February 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: ‘The Princeton Field Guide to Pterosaurs’

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Author: Gregory S. Paul

Once seen by some as evolutionary dead-enders, pterosaurs were vigorous winged reptiles capable of thriving in an array of habitats and climates, including polar winters. “the princeton field Guide to pterosaurs” transforms our understanding of these great mesozoic archosaurs of the air. This incredible guide covers 115 pterosaur species and features stunning illustrations of pterosaurs ranging in size from swallows to small sailplanes, some with enormous, bizarre head crests and elongated beaks.

 


What We Are Reading Today: A Real Right to Vote: How a Constitutional Amendment Can Safeguard American Democracy

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Updated 24 February 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: A Real Right to Vote: How a Constitutional Amendment Can Safeguard American Democracy

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Author: Richard L. Hasen

Throughout history, too many Americans have been disenfranchised or faced needless barriers to voting. Part of the blame falls on the Constitution, which does not contain an affirmative right to vote. The Supreme Court has made matters worse by failing to protect voting rights and limiting Congress’s ability to do so. The time has come for voters to take action and push for an amendment to the Constitution that would guarantee this right for all.
Drawing on troubling stories of state attempts to disenfranchise military voters, women, African Americans, students, former felons, Native Americans, and others, Richard Hasen argues that American democracy can and should do better in assuring that all eligible voters can cast a meaningful vote that will be fairly counted. He shows how a constitutional right to vote can deescalate voting wars between political parties that lead to endless rounds of litigation and undermine voter confidence in elections.


What We Are Reading Today: The Deorhord: An Old English Bestiary

What We Are Reading Today: The Deorhord: An Old English Bestiary
Updated 22 February 2024
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What We Are Reading Today: The Deorhord: An Old English Bestiary

What We Are Reading Today: The Deorhord: An Old English Bestiary

Author: Hana Videen

Many of the animals we encounter in everyday life, from pets and farm animals to the wild creatures of field and forest, have remained the same since medieval times. But the words used to name and describe them have often changed beyond recognition, starting with the Old English word for “animal” itself, deor (pronounced DAY-or).

In The Deorhord, Hana Videen presents a glittering Old English bestiary of animals real and imaginary, big and small, ordinary and extraordinary—the good, the bad, and the downright baffling.

From gange-wæfran or walker-weavers (spiders) and hasu-padan or grey-cloaked ones (eagles) to heafdu swelce mona or moon-heads (historians still don’t know!), The Deorhord introduces a world both familiar and strange: where ants could be monsters and panthers could be your friends, where dog-headed men were as real as elephants.