Nancy Pelosi’s husband’s attacker jailed for 30 years

Nancy Pelosi’s husband’s attacker jailed for 30 years
David Wayne DePape appears at U.S. District Court before U.S. Magistrate Judge Alex Tse for a hearing on federal charges over the attack on Paul Pelosi, husband of U.S. Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, in San Francisco, California on November 15, 2022. (Reuters) . ()
Short Url
Updated 18 May 2024
Follow

Nancy Pelosi’s husband’s attacker jailed for 30 years

Nancy Pelosi’s husband’s attacker jailed for 30 years

SAN FRANCISCO: A man who attacked the elderly husband of former US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi with a hammer was sentenced Friday to 30 years in prison.
David DePape was convicted last year of breaking into the couple’s San Francisco home and bludgeoning Paul Pelosi in a horrifying attack captured on police bodycam.
At the time of the October 2022 assault, Democrat Nancy Pelosi was second in line to the presidency and a regular target of outlandish far-right conspiracy theories.
Jurors in his trial last year heard how DePape — a Canadian former nudist activist who supported himself with occasional carpentry work — had initially planned to target Nancy Pelosi, planning to smash her kneecaps if she did not admit to her party’s “lies.”
On arriving at their home armed with rope, gloves and duct tape, DePape instead encountered her then-82-year-old husband, and kept asking, “Where’s Nancy?“
During what DePape told officers was a “pretty amicable” conversation with Paul Pelosi, the husband managed to call for help from law enforcement officers.
Moments later when police arrived DePape hit Pelosi with a hammer before officers rushed at him and took the weapon away.
Pelosi was knocked unconscious and had his skull fractured. He spent almost a week in a hospital, where he underwent surgery.
Nancy Pelosi was not at home the night of the attack.
Prosecutors had asked the federal court in San Francisco to sentence DePape to 40 years in prison.
In the lead up to Friday’s sentencing, Nancy Pelosi had asked the judge to impose a “very long” sentence for an attack that “has had a devastating effect on three generations of our family.”
“Even now, eighteen months after the home invasion and assault, the signs of blood and break-in are impossible to avoid.
“Our home remains a heartbreaking crime scene,” she wrote, according to court documents cited by the San Francisco Chronicle.
On Friday her office said the family was proud of Paul Pelosi “and his tremendous courage in saving his own life on the night of the attack and in testifying in this case.”
DePape had pleaded not guilty to charges that included assault on a family member of a US official, and attempted kidnapping of a US official.
While not denying the attack, his defense rested on contesting federal prosecutors’ claims that he had targeted Nancy Pelosi in her official capacity.
Instead, his lawyers argued that DePape was driven to target a number of prominent liberal figures, due to his exposure to a web of obscure conspiracy theories.
In social media posts, DePape shared QAnon theories and false claims that the last US election was stolen.
The trial heard how DePape did not intend to stop his supposed anti-corruption crusade with Pelosi, and had drawn up a list of other targets including a feminist academic whom he accused of turning US schools into “pedophile molestation factories.”
Other personalities the defendant admitted wanting to attack included California Governor Gavin Newsom, President Joe Biden’s son Hunter, and actor Tom Hanks.
Jurors took less than 10 hours to reject DePape’s explanation of the attack, which took place just a few days before the US midterm elections.
The attack itself became politicized in the weeks after it occurred, with some members of the Republican Party mocking the incident and suggesting lurid and unsubstantiated explanations for why there was a man in Pelosi’s house late at night.
US Attorney General Merrick Garland said Friday that DePape’s sentence should serve as a warning that attacks on political figures and their families were unacceptable.
“In a democracy, people vote, argue, and debate to achieve the policy outcome they desire,” he said.
“But the promise of democracy is that people will not employ violence to affect that outcome.
“The Justice Department will aggressively prosecute those who target public servants and their families with violence.”


Ukraine missile attack on Crimea kills 2, wounds 22: Moscow-appointed governor

Ukraine missile attack on Crimea kills 2, wounds 22: Moscow-appointed governor
Updated 57 min 19 sec ago
Follow

Ukraine missile attack on Crimea kills 2, wounds 22: Moscow-appointed governor

Ukraine missile attack on Crimea kills 2, wounds 22: Moscow-appointed governor
  • Sevastopol regularly comes under fire from Ukraine but the toll from Sunday’s attack was unusually high

MOSCOW: A Ukrainian missile attack Sunday on Sevastopol on the Russian-annexed Crimea peninsula killed two people including a two-year-old child and wounded 22, the city’s Moscow-appointed governor said.
Sevastopol, a Black Sea port city and naval base on the Crimean peninsula annexed by Russia in 2014, regularly comes under fire from Ukraine but the toll from Sunday’s attack was unusually high.
“According to provisional information, today’s attack by Ukraine’s armed forces on Sevastopol killed 2 peaceful residents, one of them a 2-year-old child,” Sevastopol governor Mikhail Razvozhayev wrote on Telegram.
The governor said Ukraine had launched five missiles which Russian air defenses intercepted over the sea but fragments fell onto the shore area and pieces of shrapnel wounded people.
Razvozhayev said the missile fragments hit shore areas in the north of the city and set fire to a house and woodland.
Earlier Sunday, a drone launched by Ukraine on Russia’s southern Belgorod region killed a man, the governor said.
Three Ukrainian attack drones struck the town of Graivoron a few kilometers from the border with Ukraine, said Belgorod governor Vyacheslav Gladkov, with one hitting a car park near a multi-story block of flats.
“A peaceful civilian was killed. The man died from his wounds at the spot,” Gladkov wrote on Telegram, while three were wounded.


Bangladesh moves to raise awareness of snake bites as cases surge

Bangladesh moves to raise awareness of snake bites as cases surge
Updated 23 June 2024
Follow

Bangladesh moves to raise awareness of snake bites as cases surge

Bangladesh moves to raise awareness of snake bites as cases surge
  • Around 7,000 Bangladeshis died from snake bites in 2022, government survey shows 
  • Snake infestations are on the rise globally due to impacts of climate change

DHAKA: Bangladesh is working to raise nationwide awareness about snake bites amid rising cases of such incidents across the country, an official said on Sunday.

The World Health Organization estimates that 5.4 million people worldwide are bitten by snakes each year, with over half by venomous snakes and causing around 100,000 deaths. Snake bites in South Asia contribute to nearly 70 percent of the death toll.

Bangladesh recorded around 7,000 deaths out of 400,000 snake bite incidents that occurred in 2022, according to a survey conducted by the Ministry of Health.

“The incidents of snake bites are a concerning issue for us, as people are getting frightened over it. And it’s true that snake biting incidents have increased in the country,” Dr. Mohammad Nurul Islam, a program manager at the ministry’s directorate general of health services, told Arab News.

Though officials have yet to compile current data on snake bites, hospitals across Bangladesh have reported an increase in people being bitten by snakes.

The rising number of snakes can be attributed to an ongoing breeding season, which began in April and is expected to end in September, Islam said, adding that the snakes are also moving with water hyacinth floating plants amid the rainy season.

“Besides, as an impact of climate change different types of snakes’ infestations will increase and it’s part of a global trend,” he added.

Many incidents of snake bites, some of which involved the Russel’s viper — a species commonly found in South Asia — have become a major topic on Bangladeshi social media in recent weeks.

With their drab coloring, Russell’s vipers can be hard to spot in the dense undergrowth of agricultural fields, but it does not bite unless attacked and is “very lazy in nature,” Islam said. People working outdoors must therefore remain alert and take precautions to remain safe from the species’ bite.

But as Bangladeshis are “receiving a lot of misleading information” through social media, authorities are hoping to tackle the growing misinformation through official awareness campaigns.

“We are working on providing treatment as well as removing fear from people’s minds by delivering the right information,” he said.

As most victims survive if treated quickly with anti-venom, health officials are instructing people to go to the hospital immediately after a snake bite.

“It should be done without any delay. Here, people shouldn’t waste time with the local quack doctors,” Islam said. “All our government hospitals and medical colleges across the country are equipped with enough antivenom to deal with the snake-bitten patients. It’s being provided to patients at free of cost also.”


Russian attack on Ukraine’s Kharkiv kills two: rescuers

Russian attack on Ukraine’s Kharkiv kills two: rescuers
Updated 23 June 2024
Follow

Russian attack on Ukraine’s Kharkiv kills two: rescuers

Russian attack on Ukraine’s Kharkiv kills two: rescuers

KYIV: A Russian strike on a residential building in Ukraine’s second-largest city Kharkiv killed two people and injured more than 50, rescuers said on Sunday, revising down a previous death toll.
Russia has stepped up attacks in the northeastern Kharkiv region after launching a new offensive there last month, seeking to break a largely static front line as the invasion grinds through its third year.
A five-story residential building was damaged when guided bombs hit Kharkiv city on Saturday, Ukrainian officials said, with the state emergency service announcing the completion of rescue work by Sunday morning.
“As a result of this aerial bomb strike, 2 people have been killed and 53 others were injured, including 3 children,” it wrote on Telegram.
President Volodymyr Zelensky on Saturday had announced three deaths and condemned Russia’s “calculated terror.”
An engineer wounded in a Russian strike on an energy facility in the southern Zaporizhzhia region died in hospital, regional governor Ivan Fedorov said on Sunday.

Meanwhile, one person was killed and three wounded after Ukrainian drones attacked the Russian town of Graivoron in the Belgorod region, Governor Vyacheslav Gladkov said on Sunday on the Telegram messaging app.


Deaths from Indian toxic alcohol rise to more than 50

Deaths from Indian toxic alcohol rise to more than 50
Updated 23 June 2024
Follow

Deaths from Indian toxic alcohol rise to more than 50

Deaths from Indian toxic alcohol rise to more than 50
  • Locally brewed arrack drink was laced with poisonous methanol, killing 37 within hours after they drank the illegal alcohol
  • Tamil Nadu is not a dry state, but liquor traded on the black market comes at a lower price than alcohol sold legally

BENGALURU, India: The death toll from a batch of toxic illegal alcohol in India has risen to 53, media reported Sunday, as more victims in hospital succumbed to the poisonous brew.
Tamil Nadu state Chief Minister M.K. Stalin has said the locally brewed arrack drink was laced with poisonous methanol, killing 37 within hours after they drank the illegal alcohol on Tuesday.
More than 100 people were rushed to hospital, but some were too sick for medics to save.
Hundreds of people die every year in India from cheap alcohol made in backstreet distilleries, but this poisoning is one of the worst in recent years.
To increase its potency, the liquor is often spiked with methanol which can cause blindness, liver damage and death.
The Indian Express newspaper on Sunday quoted a local councilor, Palraj, describing how poor laborers in Kallakurichi district regularly bought the liquor in plastic bags costing 60 rupees ($0.70), which they would drink before work.
Some went blind and were rushed to hospital.
Others died rapidly, collapsing in the street.
“The men work just to drink, and the women run the family,” motorized rickshaw driver Shankar, who lives on a street where 23 people died, told the Indian Express.
M.S. Prasanth, the top government official in the state’s Kallakurichi district, said “53 people have passed away,” according to the latest figures on Saturday, the Press Trust of India news agency reported.
Other Indian media on Sunday put the toll as high as 55, but there was no immediate official confirmation.
Prasanth said that seven people had been arrested in connection with the “spurious liquor tragedy,” PTI added.
Tamil Nadu is not a dry state, but liquor traded on the black market comes at a lower price than alcohol sold legally.
The Indian Express also spoke to Kolanji, a domestic helper whose husband died on Thursday after drinking a packet of the tainted brew.
She said people drank the moonshine “because they cannot afford” alcohol from the government-run shops.
“They start buying packets early in the morning,” she said.
Selling and consuming liquor is prohibited in several other parts of India, further driving the thriving black market for potent and sometimes lethal backstreet moonshine.
Last year, poisonous alcohol killed at least 27 people in one sitting in the eastern Indian state of Bihar, while in 2022, at least 42 people died in Gujarat.


Russian lawmaker warns Moscow may change timing for use of nuclear weapons

Russian lawmaker warns Moscow may change timing for use of nuclear weapons
Updated 23 June 2024
Follow

Russian lawmaker warns Moscow may change timing for use of nuclear weapons

Russian lawmaker warns Moscow may change timing for use of nuclear weapons
  • Russia’s 2020 nuclear doctrine sets out when its president would consider using a nuclear weapon

Moscow may change the timing for use of its nuclear weapons if threats against Russia increase, the RIA state news agency cited Andrei Kartapolov, the head of the Russian lower house’s defense committee, as saying on Sunday.
The former general’s comments follow recent warnings by President Vladimir Putin that Moscow may change its nuclear doctrine, which lays out the conditions in which such weapons could be used.
“If we see that the challenges and threats increase, it means that we can correct something in (the doctrine) regarding the timing of the use of nuclear weapons and the decision to make this use,” the agency quoted Kartapolov as saying.
“But of course, it’s too early to talk about specifics now.”
Russia’s 2020 nuclear doctrine sets out when its president would consider using a nuclear weapon: broadly as a response to an attack using nuclear or other weapons of mass destruction, or conventional weapons “when the very existence of the state is put under threat.”
Putin has also said Russia could test a nuclear weapon, if necessary, though he saw no need to do so at the present time.
The heightened rhetoric on nuclear weapons comes as both Russian and US diplomats say that Russia’s war in Ukraine, launched against its smaller neighbor in 2022, is in the most dangerous phase yet.