Davis Riley grabs two-shot lead at Colonial tournament

Davis Riley grabs two-shot lead at Colonial tournament
Davis Riley hits out of a trap on the second hole during the second round of the Charles Schwab Challenge golf tournament at Colonial Country Club Friday in Fort Worth, Texas. (AP)
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Updated 25 May 2024
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Davis Riley grabs two-shot lead at Colonial tournament

Davis Riley grabs two-shot lead at Colonial tournament
  • Riley is seeking his second PGA Tour title, having teamed with Nick Hardy to win the 2023 Zurich Classic two-man team event in New Orleans

LOS ANGELES: Davis Riley made six birdies in a 6-under par 64 on Friday to take a two-shot lead in the US PGA Tour’s Charles Schwab Challenge at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas.

The 27-year-old ranked 250th in the world was 10-under and in the lead but facing a par putt at his final hole when play was halted for more than an hour because of thunderstorms in the area.

“Luckily, it was a three-footer straight up the hill, so (there) wasn’t too much to stress about,” Riley said. “I knocked in about five three-footers before walking over there to cap off the round — hit it center cut and made it.

“It was nice to finish the day and made for a good, pretty stress-free six-under.”

Hayden Buckley returned from the delay to card the fifth of his five birdies at the sixth — his 15th hole of the day — posting a five-under par 65,

He was tied for second, two shots back on 8-under 132 alongside Pierceson Coody.

Coody had an eagle and six birdies in his 5-under 65, surging to his share of second with three straight birdies to end his round.

South Korea’s Im Sung-jae had seven birdies in his 6-under 64 to join a group sharing fourth on 134. He was joined by American Keegan Bradley and Austrian Sepp Straka, who both shot 66.

Riley is seeking his second PGA Tour title, having teamed with Nick Hardy to win the 2023 Zurich Classic two-man team event in New Orleans.

One off the lead to start the day, he teed off on 10 and rolled in birdies at 15 and 16 before launching a run of three straight birdies at the 18th.

He got up and down from bunkers for birdies at both the first and second, and rolled in a 10-footer for birdie at the sixth to reach 10-under.

Reigning Open champion Brian Harman headlined a group on 135 and former US Open champion Gary Woodland, back on tour this season after surgery for a brain lesion, was in a group on 136 after a six-under 64.

“I just put everything together,” said Woodland, who said he doesn’t have the same debilitating symptoms he had last year but is “still battling, still on medication.”

World No. 1 Scottie Scheffler was a further stroke back on 137 after a 5-under par 65 that featured five birdies — four in a row from the 18th through the third.

Scheffler was in danger of seeing his cuts made streak end at 36 after his two-over opening round.

But a week after his arrest in a traffic incident before the second round of the PGA Championship in Louisville, Kentucky, Scheffler turned things around.

Scheffler, who put together a run of four wins in five events — including a second Masters title in April — is still facing multiple charges in Louisville that include felony assault of a police officer after allegedly trying to go around a traffic jam as police investigated an earlier fatal road accident.

Scheffler has called the incident “a huge misunderstanding,” with his lawyer saying he “did not do anything wrong but was simply proceeding as directed.”


Pinehurst stands apart as a US Open test because of the greens

Pinehurst stands apart as a US Open test because of the greens
Updated 13 June 2024
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Pinehurst stands apart as a US Open test because of the greens

Pinehurst stands apart as a US Open test because of the greens
  • The greens at Pinehurst No. 2 are the signature of this Donald Ross course
  • Clark won last year at Los Angeles Country Club with a score of 10-under 270

PINEHURST, N.C.: Pebble Beach has the Pacific Ocean. Oakmont is the brute with its church pew bunkers. Pinehurst No. 2 has the cereal bowls turned upside down.

The greens at Pinehurst No. 2 are the signature of this Donald Ross course that hosts the 124th US Open starting on Thursday. They go by any variety of names — upside-down cereal bowls, inverted saucers, turtlebacks or domes.

Whatever they’re called, they are universally regarded as daunting, particularly for a US Open already known as the toughest test in golf.

“You hit it on the green, the hole is not done,” defending champion Wyndham Clark said.

He played when he arrived on Monday and was amazed and how firm and fast they already were, calling them “borderline” in terms of fairness. And this was still three days out from the opening tee shot on Thursday.

Perhaps that’s why in three previous US Opens at Pinehurst No. 2, a total of four players finished the championship under par. One was Payne Stewart, thanks to that famous 15-foot par putt on the final hole to beat Phil Mickelson in 1999 at 1-under par.

Martin Kaymer took advantage of the rain-softened conditions and brilliant golf to win in 2014 at 9 under, with Rickie Fowler and Erik Compton eight shots behind and the only other players in red numbers for the week.

“I’d say in general, I think the best players play aggressively off the tee and conservatively into the greens. I think this course is basically that strategy — just on steroids,” Viktor Hovland said. “I think having a shorter club in is very important. But then into the greens you’ve got to play very, very conservatively. I think just hitting the greens itself is of high value.”

There have been plenty of illustrations of that.

Jordan Spieth was practicing to the right of the par-3 ninth green on Wednesday afternoon, aiming toward a coaster the size of a golf hole on the left side. He pitched it hard, well past the hole to the top of a small ridge so that it would roll back toward his target. And it did just that, but it was a foot too far to the left and before long had run all the way off the green.

“This is one you putt,” Spieth told Sam Burns. Instead of walking over to his bag for a putter, Spieth used the left-handed putter of alternate Josh Radcliff and gave it a whack.

It can be hard to keep track of golf balls, especially when a practice group has four players, with balls rolling all over the place, some of them winding up off the green.

Such is the nature of Pinehurst No. 2. And while the course is more than a decade removed from its restoration project that returned sandy areas with native plans instead of thick rough, it’s the greens that give the course its character.

And then it’s up to the USGA to make conditions so demanding that only the most highly skilled players can handle them. Such is the essence of the US Open.

John Bodenhamer, the chief championships officer at the USGA who is in charge of setting up the course, said 2014 data showed 70 percent of the players hit the fairway, but only 56 percent of them hit the green.

“It is all about these magnificent upside-down cereal bowl putting greens,” Bodenhamer said. “They are difficult to hit, and we need to get the right firm and fast conditions around them.”

And when players miss the greens — from the fairways, sometimes from putts that roll off the crowned edges — there are options.

“I was joking with my caddie, ‘We should probably get our putter checked.’ I’ve never swung so hard on my putter for nine holes, just trying to get up and down the mounds,” PGA champion Xander Schauffele said. “There’s certain spots where you feel like you have to hit it really hard. You hit it too hard, you putt it off the other side of the green.

“Leaving yourself in a really good position is A-1,” he said. “But even when you do leave yourself in a good position, the hole is not over yet. It’s sort of half the battle.”

Clark won last year at Los Angeles Country Club with a score of 10-under 270. That week also started with Schauffele and Rickie Fowler setting a US Open record of 62 in the opening round some 10 minutes apart.

No one expects that kind of scoring this week. Bryson DeChambeau, who studied physics at SMU, cited Boo Weekley, who barely studied at all during his brief time at Abraham Baldwin Agriculture College.

“Pinehurst is no joke. This is a ball-striker’s paradise,” DeChambeau said. “You have to hit it in the middle of the greens. And this is a Boo Weekley quote, but the center of the green never moves. So I’ll try to focus on that this week.”

There is more trouble than just the greens. The sandy areas — “sandscapes” is what they are called in these parts — have wiregrass bushes the size of basketballs speckled across the terrain. Hit in there and hope — it could be a clean lie, it could be trouble.

“It’s a walk up that fairway of a bit of anxiety, because they don’t know what they’re going to get,” Bodenhamer said. “The randomness ... it’s not just 5-inch, green, lush rough. It can be something gnarly, wiregrass, or it can be a perfect sandy lie. I think you’re going to see some players walk to their golf ball and be unhappy, and others are going to be thrilled.

“We think that is pretty cool, and we think that is exactly what Donald Ross intended.”


Rahm withdraws from US Open due to left foot infection

Rahm withdraws from US Open due to left foot infection
Updated 12 June 2024
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Rahm withdraws from US Open due to left foot infection

Rahm withdraws from US Open due to left foot infection

PINEHURST, United States: Two-time major champion Jon Rahm withdrew from the 124th US Open golf tournament on Tuesday due to a left foot infection after consulting with doctors.

The Spanish world number eight Rahm pulled out of last week’s LIV Golf Houston event on Saturday due to the injury, which he suffered on Friday.

“After consulting with numerous doctors and my team, I have decided it is best for my long-term health, to withdraw from this week’s US Open,” Rahm posted on X, formerly Twitter.

“To say I’m disappointed is a massive understatement!“

Rahm had been scheduled to start his opening round on Thursday at 1:36 p.m. off the first tee at Pinehurst alongside Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama and American Jordan Spieth.

Instead, American alternate Jackson Suber will compete in his first US Open, taking Rahm’s spot, the US Golf Association (USGA) announced.

Just hours before pulling out, Rahm, 29, spoke to reporters wearing a flip-flop on his left foot and said, “It’s a concern. It’s doing better. But definitely still in pain,” and that he was uncertain of playing this week.

Rahm said the pain became more than he could handle last Saturday in Houston.

“Could I have dragged myself out there and posted some kind of a score? Yeah,” Rahm said. “But it was getting to a point where I wasn’t making the swings I wanted to make and I could have hurt other parts of my swing just because of the pain.”

Just figuring out the problem took time and hasn’t totally solved the issue.

“We’ve been trying to figure it out,” Rahm said. “I think that the closest term would be a lesion on the skin. It’s a little low in between my pinky toe and the next toe.

“I don’t know how or what happened, but it got infected. The pain was high. Saturday morning, I did get a shot to numb the area. It was supposed to last the whole round, and by my second hole I was in pain already.

“The infection was the worrisome part. The infection is now controlled, but there’s still swelling and there’s still pain.”

That’s why Rahm avoided a left shoe when he visited Pinehurst.

“Trying to keep the area dry and trying to get that to heal as soon as possible,” Rahm said. “But I can only do what I can do. The human body can only work so fast.”

The Spaniard has not won since he jumped from the PGA Tour to LIV Golf last December. He shared 45th at the Masters and missed the cut at last month’s PGA Championship.


$5m PIF Saudi International to debut at Riyadh Golf Club

$5m PIF Saudi International to debut at Riyadh Golf Club
Updated 10 June 2024
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$5m PIF Saudi International to debut at Riyadh Golf Club

$5m PIF Saudi International to debut at Riyadh Golf Club
  • Defending champion Abraham Ancer expected to play
  • Tourney moved from Royal Greens Golf & Country Club

The $5 million PIF Saudi International will debut in December at Riyadh Golf Club after five years at the Royal Greens Golf & Country Club in King Abdullah Economic City.

The tournament, backed by SoftBank Investment Advisers, takes place from Dec. 4 to 7, moving into the coveted season-ending position for both the Asian Tour and The International Series, a statement from the organizers said.

Opened in 2005, Riyadh Golf Club is the capital’s premier golf course. Its par-72 championship course is set across 6,976 meters of undulating fairways. It has played host to many of the Kingdom’s leading tournaments including the Saudi Open presented by PIF, the Aramco Team Series Riyadh and the Aramco Saudi Ladies International.

Those who are confirmed to play are defending champion Abraham Ancer, 2022 champion Harold Varner III, 2019 and 2021 winner Dustin Johnson, and 2022 Open Champion Cameron Smith.

For the first time this year, the PIF Saudi International will finish on Saturday to align with the Kingdom’s weekend as players aim for the $1 million first prize.

The tournament is the last of 10 events on the Asian Tour calendar that offer a direct pathway for players into the LIV Golf League.

The champion of the season-ending International Series Rankings will secure a spot in the 2025 LIV Golf League.

In 2023, over 30 top-ranked players were eligible to play in the innovative LIV Golf Promotions event, where an additional three players qualified for the LIV Golf League.

The same will apply for this year, as the tournament will be the last opportunity for players to qualify for the LIV Golf Promotions event and, therefore, for LIV in 2025, the statement said.


Carlos Ortiz wins LIV Golf Houston for 1st victory on the Saudi-funded league

Carlos Ortiz wins LIV Golf Houston for 1st victory on the Saudi-funded league
Updated 10 June 2024
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Carlos Ortiz wins LIV Golf Houston for 1st victory on the Saudi-funded league

Carlos Ortiz wins LIV Golf Houston for 1st victory on the Saudi-funded league

HUMBLE, Texas: Carlos Ortiz won LIV Golf Houston on Sunday for his first victory on the Saudi-funded league and second big win in the Houston area.

Ortiz closed with a 5-under 67 to beat Adrian Meronk by a stroke at the Golf Club of Houston. The Mexican player won the 2020 Houston Open at Memorial Park for his lone PGA Tour title.

Part of a four-way tie for the lead entering the day, the 33-year-old Ortiz finished at 15-under 201.

Meronk shot a 68 to help Cleeks GC win the team title. The German joined LIV Golf this year.

Area resident Patrick Reed had a 68 to tie for third at 12 under with Spain’s David Puig (69). Sergio Garcia was fifth at 11 under after a 68.

On Saturday, Jon Rahm withdrew after playing just six holes because of an infected left foot, leaving his status in doubt for the US Open next week at Pinehurst No. 2.


Top-ranked Scheffler seizes three-stroke lead at Memorial

Top-ranked Scheffler seizes three-stroke lead at Memorial
Updated 08 June 2024
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Top-ranked Scheffler seizes three-stroke lead at Memorial

Top-ranked Scheffler seizes three-stroke lead at Memorial
  • Cheffler has four triumphs and two runner-up efforts in his past seven starts
  • Defending champion Viktor Hovland of Norway fired his second 69 to share second with Canada’s Adam Hadwin

DUBLIN, Ohio: World No. 1 Scottie Scheffler grinded through brisk winds to fire a 4-under 68 and grab a three-stroke lead after Friday’s second round of the PGA Memorial tournament.

The two-time Masters champion, seeking his fifth victory of the year, stood on 9-under 135 after 36 holes at the Jack Nicklaus-hosted event in Muirfield Village.

“You’ve got to play it fairly conservative out here, just with how much trouble there is around the golf course. There’s a lot of hazards and you’ve got the heavy rough,” Scheffler said.

“Can be really tough to judge the wind. I’m just trying to do my best to execute. Sometimes I get the wind right and hit the right shot. Other times, things don’t work out as well.

“We’ll see how the winds are this weekend. I think it’ll only get tougher.”

Defending champion Viktor Hovland of Norway fired his second 69 to share second with Canada’s Adam Hadwin, the 18-hole leader who settled for a 72 to finish on 128.

“Some nice gusts there,” Hovland said. “And some steady winds makes it even more difficult. So did a good job of just hitting a bunch of fairways, but even then, there’s a lot of thinking and guessing going into the greens.

“It’s just hard to get it close to the hole, but I managed to do that somehow.”

South African Christiaan Bezuidenhout and American Keegan Bradley shared fourth on 139 with Sweden’s Ludvig Aberg on 140.

Four-time major winner Rory McIlroy was on 141 with Americans Tony Finau, Akshay Bhatia and second-ranked Xander Schauffele.

Scheffler has four triumphs and two runner-up efforts in his past seven starts and appeared poised for another top-two finish in the final tuneup for next week’s US Open.

The 27-year-old American seeks his 10th career PGA Tour title.

Scheffler dropped his approach to eight feet and sank the birdie putt at the third hole to match Hadwin for the lead, then moved ahead with a birdie putt from just inside eight feet at the par-5 fifth to reach 7-under.

Scheffler made another birdie putt from just inside six feet at the ninth to reach the turn ahead by two.

At 10, Scheffler missed the green with his approach but sank a putt from just beyond 15 feet to save par. At the par-5 11th he found the left rough and a greenside bunker then missed a par putt from just inside 10 feet.

Scheffler found the left rough off the 13th tee and missed an 11 foot par putt, dropping him back into a share of the lead with Hadwin.

“That’s a bad miss there,” Scheffler said. “Unfortunate series of events but still felt like I was hitting it really well.”

Scheffler righted his round, however, at the par-5 15th, when he reached the green in two and sank an eagle putt from just inside nine feet to restore his two-stroke edge.

“It was nice to get one in close on 15 and make a putt,” Scheffler said.

At 18, Scheffler sent his tee shot into a fairway bunker, landed his approach just inside 12 feet, then curled in a birdie putt.

“Got a good break,” Scheffler said. “Ended up in the bunker instead of the rough and was able to get up there on the green and hole another nice putt.”

Hovland birdied three of the last six holes, a tap-in at the last matching him with Hadwin, who took a double bogey at 17 after finding fairway and greenside bunkers.

Schauffele, coming of his first major win at the PGA Championship last month, shot 73 but hit his most spectacular shot at 14. He soared way right of the cart path, then over the green into a bunker, but blasted in for birdie from 28 feet.

Jackson Koivun, a 19-year-old US collegian, became the first amateur since 2009 to make the Memorial cut, doing so on the number at 148 despite a 76.

“It’s awesome,” Koivun said. “Today is probably the hardest golf conditions and course I ever played.”