Beggars exploit kindness of pilgrims in Madinah

Beggars exploit kindness of pilgrims in Madinah
Updated 17 August 2016

Beggars exploit kindness of pilgrims in Madinah

Beggars exploit kindness of pilgrims in Madinah

MADINAH: Beggars of different nationalities are using a variety of means and tactics to gain the sympathy of pilgrims in Madinah, reportedly swarming the different locations that are frequently visited by Umrah performers and pilgrims, such as known Islamic and historic places in the city.
Beggars normally take advantage of the compassion and kindness shown by the pilgrims and their eagerness to give alms in this holy city, which beggars see as the best and quickest way of gaining money without any hardship. They often resort to exhibiting some disability, most often, though, simply sitting on road and begging.
Arab News spotted a number of men and women beggars of Asian nationalities who took the top of Al-Rumat Mountain as a place to beg from, away from authorities’ control.
Hiding behind cloaks, the beggars chase pilgrims and utter certain phrases in their own languages, such as Indonesian, Turkish, Urdu of African languages.
In one of the incidents, Arab News detected one woman beggar giving back change to one pilgrim. An Asian male beggar showed his disability to beg.
In a related development, Pakistani pilgrim Shuwaib Abdulrazzaq said beggars were chasing pilgrims and insisting to get money from them which, he said, is uncivilized.
Indian pilgrim Shakir Islam-ul-Deen said he saw many beggars on Al-Rumat Mountain bothering pilgrims and chasing after them everywhere.
Exploiting their kindness, beggars never leave pilgrims until they give them money, he pointed out.


Madinah joins world’s healthiest cities

Madinah joins world’s healthiest cities
Madinah is believed to be the first city with a population of more than 2 million to be recognized under the organization’s healthy cities program. (SPA)
Updated 24 January 2021

Madinah joins world’s healthiest cities

Madinah joins world’s healthiest cities
  • The holy city gained World Health Organization accreditation after meeting all global standards

JEDDAH: The Saudi city of Madinah has been acknowledged by the World Health Organization (WHO) as among the world’s healthiest cities.
The holy city gained the accreditation after a visiting WHO team said that it met all the global standards required to be a healthy city.
Madinah is believed to be the first city with a population of more than 2 million to be recognized under the organization’s healthy cities program.
A total of 22 government, community, charity and volunteer agencies helped prepare for the WHO accreditation.
The city’s integrated program included a strategic partnership with Taibah University to record government requirements on an electronic platform for the organization’s review.
The WHO also recommended that the university provide training to other national city agencies interested in taking part in the healthy cities program.

FASTFACTS

• Madinah is believed to be the first city with a population of more than 2 million to be recognized under the organization’s healthy cities program.

• A total of 22 government, community, charity and volunteer agencies helped prepare for the WHO accreditation.

A committee chaired by the university’s president, Dr. Abdul Aziz Assarani, supervised 100 members representing the 22 government, civil, charity and volunteer agencies.
Criteria included meeting goals set by the Madinah Region Strategy Project and the launch of a “Humanizing Cities” program.
According to WHO, “a healthy city is one that is continually creating and improving those physical and social environments and expanding those community resources which enable people to mutually support each other in performing all the functions of life and developing to their maximum potential.”