How wearable biometric devices are changing individual identification

How wearable biometric devices are changing individual identification
Updated 17 January 2015

How wearable biometric devices are changing individual identification

How wearable biometric devices are changing individual identification

What exactly are “wearables” and why are they becoming so popular? Wearable biometric devices refer to electronic physiologic tracking technology incorporated into items of clothing and/or accessories that can read, record, and store individual biometric traits such as your heart rate, blood pressure, calorie intake, monitoring sleep, measuring steps, or charting any type of physical activity, and most wearables communicate data through wireless Wi-Fi or near field communication (NFC) technology. The future of individual identification in consumer based industries will be led by the integration of wearable technology with authentication and identification in both physical and virtual environments. Examples of potential wearable devices that could be included in this integration are smart watches, bands, ear-pods, jewelry, eyeglasses, contact lenses and clothing.
Many wearable devices now include biometric identification capabilities and have the potential to influence how we identify ourselves in the fields of health and medicine, fitness, education, transportation, finance, gaming, and music.
The burgeoning field of biometric identification uses physiological features such as fingerprints, finger vein and palm vein patterns, as well as iris and facial recognition to verify individual identities by comparing a live person’s biological credentials with a previously stored biometric template. Biometrics are used as a high level identification mechanism offering strong security in many government and commercial settings including border control, voter registration, public safety, workforce management, financial services, and more. There are many types of wearable biometric devices used in different industries in different scenarios, each of them playing a vital role to bring security and convenience to consumers. Here are some top wearable devices with biometric identification capabilities that are used in industries for various purposes:
Google Glass: Google Glass is a wearable technology with an optical head-mounted display (OHMD). This wearable device is compatible with voice and facial recognition and has the capability to perform individual identification. Google glass opened a new era of reliable identification methods for law enforcement agencies to identify criminals, banks to verify customers, and in health care for accurate patient identification.
The applications of Google Glass for identification are far reaching. For example, Dubai police will soon use Google Glass for field operation purposes with a custom-developed facial recognition software platform. Dubai police will now be able to capture photos of people around them and search their faces in a database of people wanted for crimes.
According to the Financial Times, a number of banks, including Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Ukraine’s PrivatBank, are developing so-called augmented reality apps to use with Google Glass to verify customers with added information about their physical surroundings in real time using voice and facial recognition.
Smart watches: ”Smart watches” are getting smarter, containing operating systems that can now perform multiple tasks such as calculations, translations, functioning as media player, making or answering phone calls, and a host of other functions that extend their utility far beyond keeping time. On the horizon are smart watches with biometric authentication capabilities that promise to accelerate their adoption for individual identification.
Samsung Electronics, together with global financial transaction service PayPal, is preparing to install a mobile payment function into smart watches by using a biometric identification sensor including fingerprint verification that will enable end users to quickly sign into PayPal and easily make secure mobile payments. This would increase the ability to simplify payment authentication on a device with limited space for a long PIN or password that will lead the retail industry to adopt wearable biometric devices for individual identification in payment systems.
Wristbands: Wristbands are very comfortable to use and now offer end users — biometric authentication capabilities using their heart rate, blood pressure, or body temperature. These types of wristbands are capable of individual identification for different purposes such as health care for patient identification and monitoring, financial services for customer and employee identification, in retail for fast transactions, and for use in the ”Internet of Things” for virtual authentication. The Royal bank of Canada is trialing lower risk biometric banking payments using a wearable biometric wristband device for customer identification with the tap of a wrist at the point of sale.
Wearable biometric devices connected with smartphones or computers using wireless Bluetooth, WI-FI, or NFC bring a convenient way to identify individuals in different industries. Healthcare, banking/financial services, and the Internet of Things are examples of settings that stand to see huge benefits in different identification scenarios such as patient identification, mobile payments, banking transactions, employee identification, digital authentication, and more. Here are some key benefit of using wearables for individual identification:
Accurate Identification: Wearable biometric devices help perform accurate identification when speed and higher accuracy are needed. Industries such as health care, banking, and retail can benefit using this technology for convenient transactions and access control authentication.
Fast, Accurate Retail Payment Identification: Wearable biometric devices allow end users to quickly pay for point of sale and online goods and services. Payment services like AliPay, Apple Pay, and PayPal are planning to move from smart mobile devices to wearable devices to offer convenient, biometrically-authenticated payments.
Increase Productivity and Accountability in Workforce Management: Enterprises can use wearable biometric devices to identify employees for access control purposes, to record time and attendance, and automatically allow access to sensitive information. This can help businesses to increase productivity and accountability and implement secure access control systems.
Unique Security Features: Consumers are concerned about security when using mobile based payments. Wearable biometric devices provide unique and secure identification features that increases faith and trust among consumers to engage in mobile transactions.

Author bio: Arifin Hussain is the SEO Specialist with M2SYS Technology, an award-winning industry leader in biometric identity management technology.


Encrypted chat app Signal alleges flaws in Cellebrite equipment

Encrypted chat app Signal alleges flaws in Cellebrite equipment
Updated 22 April 2021

Encrypted chat app Signal alleges flaws in Cellebrite equipment

Encrypted chat app Signal alleges flaws in Cellebrite equipment

WASHINGTON: Encrypted chat app Signal suggested in a blog post published on Wednesday that products sold to law enforcement from Israeli surveillance provider Cellebrite can easily be sabotaged.
Cellebrite DI Ltd, which specializes in helping law enforcement and intelligence agencies copy call logs, texts, photos and other data off of smartphones, has repeatedly come under fire for past sales to authoritarian governments, including Russia and China.
Signal, a privacy-focused app eager to show the lengths it goes to protect users’ conversations, clashed with Cellebrite last year when the Israeli company said its equipment was upgraded to allow law enforcement to scoop up Signal messages from devices in their possession.
Signal creator and CEO Moxie Marlinspike said in his blog post on Wednesday he had come into possession of a bag of Cellebrite equipment and examined the gear inside.
He was “surprised to find that very little care seems to have been given to Cellebrite’s own software security,” Marlinspike said, noting it would be easy to add a specially crafted file onto a phone that would derail Cellebrite’s functionality.
In a statement, Cellebrite did not directly address Marlinspike’s claim but said that the company’s employees “continually audit and update our software in order to equip our customers with the best digital intelligence solutions available.”
Elsewhere in his blog post, Marlinspike alleged he had found snippets of code from Apple Inc. inside Cellebrite’s software, something he said “might present a legal risk for Cellebrite and its users” if it was done without authorization.
Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Signal’s allegations come as Cellebrite prepares to go public through a merger with a blank-check firm, valuing the equity of the combined company at around $2.4 billion. 


American, Russians dock at ISS in flight honoring first man in space

American, Russians dock at ISS in flight honoring first man in space
Updated 10 April 2021

American, Russians dock at ISS in flight honoring first man in space

American, Russians dock at ISS in flight honoring first man in space
  • Launch timed with 60th anniversary of Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin's historic flight
  • It was also the 40th anniversary of the first launch of NASA’s space shuttle

MOSCOW: A trio of Russian and American space travelers launched successfully and reached the International Space Station on Friday.
NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei and Russian cosmonauts Oleg Novitskiy and Pyotr Dubrov blasted off as scheduled at 12:42 p.m. (0742 GMT, 3:42 a.m. EDT) aboard the Soyuz MS-18 spacecraft from the Russia-leased Baikonur launch facility in Kazakhstan.
They docked at the station after a two-orbit journey that lasted just over three hours.
It is the second space mission for Vande Hei and the third for Novitskiy, while Dubrov is on his first mission.
The launch came three days before the 60th anniversary of the first human flight to space by Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin and the 40th anniversary of the first launch of NASA’s space shuttle.
“When we started, we were competing with each other and that was one of the reasons we were so successful at the beginning of human space flight,” Vande Hei said at a pre-flight news conference Thursday. “And as time went on, we realized that by working together we can achieve even more. And of course, that’s continuing to this day and I hope that it will continue into the future.”
The three will work on hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science.
On the International Space Station, they are joining NASA’s Kate Rubins, Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker, Russians Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi.
Rubins, Ryzhikov and Kud-Sverchkov arrived in a Soyuz ship in October; Hopkins, Glover, Walker and Noguchi — the crew of the SpaceX Crew Dragon Resilience — joined them in November.


NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter dropped on Mars’ surface ahead of flight

NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter dropped on Mars’ surface ahead of flight
Updated 04 April 2021

NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter dropped on Mars’ surface ahead of flight

NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter dropped on Mars’ surface ahead of flight
  • The ultra-light aircraft had been fixed to the belly of the Perseverance rover, which touched down on the Red Planet on February 18

WASHINGTON: NASA’s Ingenuity mini-helicopter has been dropped on the surface of Mars in preparation for its first flight, the US space agency said.
The ultra-light aircraft had been fixed to the belly of the Perseverance rover, which touched down on the Red Planet on February 18.
“MarsHelicopter touchdown confirmed!” NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory tweeted Saturday.
“Its 293 million mile (471 million kilometer) journey aboard @NASAPersevere ended with the final drop of 4 inches (10 centimeter) from the rover’s belly to the surface of Mars today. Next milestone? Survive the night.”
A photograph accompanying the tweet showed Perseverance had driven clear of the helicopter and its “airfield” after dropping to the surface.
Ingenuity had been feeding off the Perseverance’s power system but will now have to use its own battery to run a vital heater to protect its unshielded electrical components from freezing and cracking during the bitter Martian night.
“This heater keeps the interior at about 45 degrees F (7 degrees Celsius) through the bitter cold of the Martian night, where temperatures can drop to as low as -130F (-90 degrees Celsius),” Bob Balaram, Mars Helicopter Project chief engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, wrote in an update on Friday.
“That comfortably protects key components such as the battery and some of the sensitive electronics from harm at very cold temperatures.”
Over the next couple of days, the Ingenuity team will check that the helicopter’s solar panels are working properly and recharging its battery before testing its motors and sensors ahead of its first flight, Balaram said.
Ingenuity is expected to make its first flight attempt no earlier than April 11, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory tweeted.
Ingenuity will be attempting to fly in an atmosphere that is one percent the density of Earth’s, which makes achieving lift harder — but will be assisted by gravity that is one-third of our planet’s.
The first flight will involve climbing at a rate of about three feet (one meter) per second to a height of 10 feet (three meters), hovering there for 30 seconds, then descending back to the surface.
Ingenuity will be taking high-resolution photography as it flies.
Up to five flights of gradual difficulty are planned over the month.
The 1.8-kilogram rotorcraft cost NASA around $85 million to develop and is considered a proof of concept that could revolutionize space exploration.
Future aircraft could cover ground much quicker than rovers, and explore more rugged terrain.


A digital library offers Saudis affordable access to scholarly research

A digital library offers Saudis affordable access to scholarly research
Updated 22 March 2021

A digital library offers Saudis affordable access to scholarly research

A digital library offers Saudis affordable access to scholarly research
  • Saudi students, researchers and professionals will soon benefit from a vast new digital library of academic literature
  • Zendy’s creator Kamran Kardan says his ed-tech start-up will help the MENA region develop knowledge-based economies

DUBAI: A Dubai-based edutech start-up has launched a digital library for researchers in Saudi Arabia — the first subscription-based library for scholarly literature of its kind in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

Academic literature is usually hidden behind expensive paywalls or restricted to those who are affiliated with big organizations. Now Zendy, developed by Knowledge E, is offering users affordable access to scholarly works from around the world.

In step with the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 development agenda and its efforts to foster a culture of research, innovation and entrepreneurship, Zendy will give students, professionals and hobbyists access to thousands of articles, e-books and scholarly resources.

Zendy will seek to streamline the often cumbersome process of accessing academic texts online. (AFP)

“Zendy is a massive online library available to every single individual in the region,” Kamran Kardan, Knowledge E founder and CEO, told Arab News.

“If you take a look at the current status of how you can access academic content, books, journals and literature related to that, it’s very cumbersome,” he said.

“You have to be a part of a larger institution, university or organization like the ministry of health, or a place where they can actually afford access to the content. And not all institutions can afford access to all the multiple publishers that are available out there.”

Zendy’s aim is to break down barriers to scholarly discovery by providing individuals with affordable access to the world’s latest research and literature — drawing inspiration from the evolution of music and television consumption.

“The whole idea stemmed from what’s happening to the entertainment and music industry, like Netflix and iTunes, and applying it to academic content, making it affordable,” Kardan said. “So, the whole idea was to open all of that content up and make it affordable, on a monthly subscription or an annual cost.”

ZENDYFACTS

  • Zendy first launched in Jordan in late 2019.
  • Digital library hosts over 120,000 publications.
  • Subscribers in the UAE, Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia.

With a background in publishing at Oxford University Press in the UK, Kardan has made it his mission to promote open access and to help higher education institutions discover new research strategies through various business frameworks. He moved to Dubai 15 years ago to promote scholarly access among universities, businesses and consortiums across the region.

“When I moved in 2006, it was the start of a transition from the print world to electronic,” he said. “Libraries were predominantly shelves full of books and journals and, if you could imagine a researcher who was trying to find something, it was such an effort to go through all these different indexes that you have available.

“To actually find all the relevant information you were looking for was a task of its own.”

Kamran Kardan, Knowledge E founder and CEO. (Supplied)

In the years that followed, Kardan worked with consortiums in Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Egypt to provide scholarly access on a national level. “Many universities did not have that much access during those days,” he said.

“I remember a university in Kuwait where I had one of the most complete collections of journals from one of the top publishers and going through that transition of moving everything to online — providing more digital libraries to the region was the story of those days.”

Beyond the evolution of digital infrastructure itself, publishing has also had to account for the slow pace of cultural change, with many people continuing to prefer books in paper format for all manner of reasons, including the simple aesthetic of touch and smell.

So far, most of Zendy’s content is only available in English, although some is offered in French and other languages, with the objective of linguistically diversifying further in the near future.

“The idea is to have a comprehensive online library at the fingertips of every single person,” Kardan said. “It is no longer an issue that you can’t afford it, no matter where you’re located, if you’re not part of a larger institution. We don’t target institutions, we target individuals.”

Zendy will seek to streamline the often cumbersome process of accessing academic texts online. (AFP)

After launching in Jordan in 2019, Zendy spread out to the UAE, Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Bahrain and, from this month onward, it will be available in Saudi Arabia. The online library has since accumulated thousands of users across the Arab region, hosting over 120,000 publications including more than 30,000 journals and 30,000 e-books.

Zendy also allows users to save searches, export citations and navigate easily according to material type, subject, publication title, language and more.

“You can search, find the article, download the PDF and you can use it as many times as you want,” Kardan said.

“We would like to have more publishers, and this is something that is growing. We have three of the top five publishers in the world and you can imagine that, for publishers that have existing business models with organizations, it is difficult to shift and make everything accessible to all individuals.

“So, it’s also a great step for publishers and that’s why we want to break this barrier.”

To access content, users sign up for a free trial period before choosing between a monthly or annual subscription. Zendy’s business model is based on revenue sharing with publishers based on usage. And, true to Kardan’s ideals, some content will remain free to all.

“There is a portion of free content that will be available in open-access format around the world in a few months’ time,” he said. “So, individuals who are happy with free content can keep that. And then in order to have access to the more premium content, users will need to sign up to Zendy Plus, which is what is currently available.”

Zendy will seek to streamline the often cumbersome process of accessing academic texts online. (AFP)

Kardan hopes Zendy will have a big impact on the countries of the MENA region, playing a role in the creation of diversified, knowledge-based societies and economies. He is confident that providing easy access to information, open to all, is one way of achieving this goal.

“We are also involved in other ways of building that in terms of conducting workshops in academia and building capacity,” he said. “It doesn’t matter how small you are, you can still make a change. In whatever we do as a company, we try to make that change and impact and we think that Zendy is one of those that has the potential to have a global impact.”

Although in its early stages in Saudi Arabia, subscribers include entrepreneurs and healthcare professionals, such as doctors and nurses. Kardan’s goal is to scale up the platform into a global operation in order to allow easier access to content to many more people around the world.

There are also plans to include videos, book summaries and magazines down the line.

“It’s really to increase readership in all of those areas and to shift this literature world online,” he said. “For me, success is to eventually look back and see what impact I was able to have on the people and society around me.”

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Twitter: @CalineMalek


US charges Swiss ‘hacktivist’ for data theft and leaks

US charges Swiss ‘hacktivist’ for data theft and leaks
Updated 19 March 2021

US charges Swiss ‘hacktivist’ for data theft and leaks

US charges Swiss ‘hacktivist’ for data theft and leaks
  • Kottmann had described the most recent hack and leak of camera footage from customers of California security-camera provider Verkada as part of a “hacktivist” cause of exposing the dangers of mass surveillance
  • The indictment says Kottmann also hacked the Washington state Department of Transportation, an automobile manufacturer and a financial investment company

SEATTLE: The Justice Department has charged a Swiss hacker with computer intrusion and identity theft, just over a week after the hacker took credit for helping to break into the online systems of a US security-camera startup.
An indictment against 21-year-old Till Kottmann was brought Thursday by a grand jury in the Western District of Washington.
Federal prosecutors said Thursday that Kottmann, of Lucerne, Switzerland, was initially charged in September on a range of allegations dating back to 2019 involving stealing credentials and data and publishing source code and proprietary information from more than 100 entities on the web.
Kottmann had described the most recent hack and leak of camera footage from customers of California security-camera provider Verkada as part of a “hacktivist” cause of exposing the dangers of mass surveillance.
Acting US Attorney Tessa Gorman rejected those motives in a statement Thursday.
“These actions can increase vulnerabilities for everyone from large corporations to individual consumers,” Gorman wrote. “Wrapping oneself in an allegedly altruistic motive does not remove the criminal stench from such intrusion, theft, and fraud.”
Kottmann didn’t immediately return an online request for comment Thursday.
Swiss authorities said they had raided Kottmann’s home in Lucerne late last week at the request of US authorities.
The indictment ties a number of hacks to Kottmann over the past year, including one targeting an unnamed security device manufacturer based in the Seattle region and another affecting a maker of tactical equipment.
In several cases, prosecutors said Kottmann improperly used valid employee credentials to gain access to source code databases. The indictment says Kottmann also hacked the Washington state Department of Transportation, an automobile manufacturer and a financial investment company.
The indictment doesn’t mention last week’s high-profile hack of Verkada, which drew attention because it exposed live camera feeds and archived video footage from schools, jails, factories, gyms and corporate offices.
Kottmann, who uses they/them pronouns, told The Associated Press last week they belonged to a group nicknamed APT-69420 Arson Cats, a small collective of “primarily queer hackers, not backed by any nations or capital but instead backed by the desire for fun, being gay and a better world.”
Kottmann has previously attracted attention for leaking hacked material to expose security flaws, including from US chipmaker Intel last year.