Unemployment increases chances of heart attacks

Updated 21 November 2012

Unemployment increases chances of heart attacks

CHICAGO: Unemployment hurts more than your wallet — it may damage your heart. That’s according to a study linking joblessness with heart attacks in older American workers. The increased odds weren’t huge, although multiple job losses posed as big a threat as smoking, high blood pressure and other conditions that are bad for the heart.
The researchers analyzed data on more than 13,000 US men and women aged 51 to 75 taking part in an ongoing health and retirement survey partly sponsored by the National Institute on Aging. Since 1992, participants have been interviewed every two years about their employment and health.
The new analysis has several limitations. The data show periods of unemployment but don’t indicate whether people were fired, laid off, out of work while switching jobs, or had voluntarily left a job. The researchers considered all of these situations “job losses,” but it’s likely the greatest risks for heart attacks were from being fired or laid off, said researcher Matthew Dupre, an assistant professor at Duke University and the lead author. Sarah Burgard, a University of Michigan researcher who has studied the relationship between job loss and health, called the research solid but said it would be important to know the reason for the unemployment.
“There probably are differences in consequences of job loss when it’s voluntary or more or less expected” and when it comes as a sudden shock, said Burgard, who was not involved in the study.
The analysis appears in Monday’s Archives of Internal Medicine. An editorial in the journal says the study adds to decades of research linking job loss with health effects and that research should now turn to examining how and why that happens.
Theories include that the stress of losing a job may trigger a heart attack in people with clogged arteries or heart disease; and that the unemployed lose health insurance and access to medical care that can help keep them healthy, Burgard said.
The analysis covers 1992-2010. Participants were mostly in their 50s at the study’s beginning and were asked about their job history, and about employment status and recent heart attacks at subsequent interviews. People who’d had heart attacks before the study began were excluded.
Nearly 70 percent had at least one job loss, or period of unemployment after working at a job, and at least 10 percent had four or more before and/or during the study period.
There were 1,061 heart attacks during the study. Those with at least one job loss were 22 percent more likely to have a heart attack than those who never lost a job. Those with at least four job losses had a 60 percent higher risk than those with none. Men and women faced equal risks.
Even though the odds linked with job loss weren’t huge, many participants already faced increased other risks for a heart attack because of obesity, high blood pressure or lack of exercise.

“Any significant additional risk is important,” Dupre said.
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What We Are Eating Today: Shiro

Updated 05 June 2020

What We Are Eating Today: Shiro

It is always refreshing to stumble across a new eatery and for me, this was one unexpected bonus to come out of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) quarantine period.

Gripped by a sudden lockdown craving for sushi, I took to the HungerStation app to search for a suitable Japanese restaurant and found Shiro.

Opened in Riyadh in 2017, it has yet to achieve the recognition of other sushi chains such as Sushi Yoshi, Tokyo, or Nozomi. But my first experience of Shiro certainly set my taste buds buzzing.

From the standard California roll to the more adventurous dragon-eye fry, Shiro’s menu covers a wide range of the sushi spectrum, including traditional, purist-friendly sashimi.

I would recommend the deep-fried, sauce-doused special avocado fry, as well as the rainbow roll California, and the mixed tempura futomaki. For a tamer option, go for the classic temaki.

The restaurant also offers dishes to satisfy non-sushi palates, which can help settle family debates over which outlet to order from.

One of the menu highlights was Shiro’s miso soup with its perfectly balanced flavors. My fellow diners also enjoyed the crab salad, which came with a lovely light dressing, crunchy sweetcorn, and baby corn, and the chicken noodles were another big hit.

Shiro gives customers the option to customize any of its wok entrees, and we chose chicken, udon noodles, and teriyaki sauce. The udon noodles are the real deal; thick, chewy, and utterly satisfying. Orders can be made online at https://shiro.com.sa or via HungerStation.