Unemployment increases chances of heart attacks

Updated 21 November 2012

Unemployment increases chances of heart attacks

CHICAGO: Unemployment hurts more than your wallet — it may damage your heart. That’s according to a study linking joblessness with heart attacks in older American workers. The increased odds weren’t huge, although multiple job losses posed as big a threat as smoking, high blood pressure and other conditions that are bad for the heart.
The researchers analyzed data on more than 13,000 US men and women aged 51 to 75 taking part in an ongoing health and retirement survey partly sponsored by the National Institute on Aging. Since 1992, participants have been interviewed every two years about their employment and health.
The new analysis has several limitations. The data show periods of unemployment but don’t indicate whether people were fired, laid off, out of work while switching jobs, or had voluntarily left a job. The researchers considered all of these situations “job losses,” but it’s likely the greatest risks for heart attacks were from being fired or laid off, said researcher Matthew Dupre, an assistant professor at Duke University and the lead author. Sarah Burgard, a University of Michigan researcher who has studied the relationship between job loss and health, called the research solid but said it would be important to know the reason for the unemployment.
“There probably are differences in consequences of job loss when it’s voluntary or more or less expected” and when it comes as a sudden shock, said Burgard, who was not involved in the study.
The analysis appears in Monday’s Archives of Internal Medicine. An editorial in the journal says the study adds to decades of research linking job loss with health effects and that research should now turn to examining how and why that happens.
Theories include that the stress of losing a job may trigger a heart attack in people with clogged arteries or heart disease; and that the unemployed lose health insurance and access to medical care that can help keep them healthy, Burgard said.
The analysis covers 1992-2010. Participants were mostly in their 50s at the study’s beginning and were asked about their job history, and about employment status and recent heart attacks at subsequent interviews. People who’d had heart attacks before the study began were excluded.
Nearly 70 percent had at least one job loss, or period of unemployment after working at a job, and at least 10 percent had four or more before and/or during the study period.
There were 1,061 heart attacks during the study. Those with at least one job loss were 22 percent more likely to have a heart attack than those who never lost a job. Those with at least four job losses had a 60 percent higher risk than those with none. Men and women faced equal risks.
Even though the odds linked with job loss weren’t huge, many participants already faced increased other risks for a heart attack because of obesity, high blood pressure or lack of exercise.

“Any significant additional risk is important,” Dupre said.
___


UAE’s ‘New National Dish’ exhibition offers a taste of the future

The exhibition is on show in Dubai on Jan. 24 and 25. (Supplied)
Updated 22 January 2020

UAE’s ‘New National Dish’ exhibition offers a taste of the future

  • The show presents four imagined proposals for a new Emirati national dish, based on the environmental, economic and social impacts of climate change

DUBAI: Future food scenarios are imagined in “New National Dish: UAE,” an exhibition at AlSerkal Avenue in Dubai open January 24 and 25.

The show presents four imagined proposals for a new Emirati national dish, based on the environmental, economic and social impacts of climate change.

Zac Denfeld, director of the Center for Genomic Gastronomy — the artist-led think tank behind the show, which has previously examined the biotechnologies and biodiversity of human food systems in Ireland — spoke to Arab News about the exhibition, which follows similar shows in Poland and Norway.

“We do some research and look at the way food might change, and then propose a new national dish,” Denfeld, who is currently based in Norway, said. “The UAE has a strong desire for food security and there are many scientific projects happening here, (including) indoor growing, vertical growing using somewhat salty water.”

Visitors to the exhibition will get to try the food and discuss the future of popular dishes. (Supplied)

For the Dubai show, produced by AlSerkal, Denfeld and his colleagues concentrated on identifying Emirati food for which most of the ingredients are grown in the country.

“We are also considering the changing preferences for the eaters; what they are going to want in the future,” Denfeld explained. For example, the team imagined and created a new kind of sushi, replacing the fish meat with watermelon prepared with a seaweed machine to make the fruit taste and feel like fish.

“That’s also combined over rice, like sushi, because the UAE is now working with China to develop a rice that can grow in the salty conditions,” Denfeld said. “So, this is a way of combining a future where rice is actually grown (in the Emirates) — which has never been done — and an alternative approach to fish, where we might eat a little bit less fish or only have the (selected) parts.”

Visitors to the exhibition will get to try the food and discuss the future of popular dishes. “That’s really interesting for us,” said Denfield. “Because we are not really saying, ‘Okay, this is the future. This is what you should do.’ We are giving four very different perspectives, and people can choose what their favorite is.”