People told not to eat pesticide-laced locusts

Updated 04 April 2013

People told not to eat pesticide-laced locusts

The Ministry of Agriculture has warned citizens and residents against eating locusts found on the ground as they have been subject to heavy insecticide-spraying.
The ministry’s warning, which has appeared in various local media outlets, said eating locusts might expose humans to serious health hazards.
“Boiling or cooking the locusts for eating purposes will aggravate the adverse effects of the chemicals in the insecticides,” the ministry's announcement said.
Last month, agriculture experts predicted that swarms of desert locusts would migrate to various parts of the Kingdom at the end of March and the beginning of this month.
Adnan Al-Khan, director of the Jeddah-based Saudi Center for Locust Control and Research at the Ministry of Agriculture, said the desert locusts were expected to reach the north coast of Saudi Arabia and begin hatching there.
UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) experts said desert locusts originated in Sudan and gradually moved to the southern parts of Egypt. Air currents and spraying of pesticide by agricultural officials have deflected locust swarms to other parts of the Kingdom, they said.


Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO makes Forbes 100 most powerful women

Updated 13 December 2019

Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO makes Forbes 100 most powerful women

Saudi Arabia’s first female CEO is named in Forbes 100 most powerful women in the world for a second time.

Rania Nashar, Samba Financial Group CEO, was ranked 97th in the list that also included 16-year-old climate change activist Greta Thunberg.

The list also included the United Arab Emirates’ Raja Easa Al-Gurg ranked at 84. The Emirati, who is a Board Member of the Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry, was also featured in the list in 2017.

The top 10 in the list included German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Christine Lagarde, who was newly appointed president of the European Central Bank.