MWL: Extremism has little foothold in Muslim world

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Mohammed Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League, addresses a conference in New York on Saturday.
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Updated 17 September 2017

MWL: Extremism has little foothold in Muslim world

NEW YORK: The vast majority of Muslims are interested in cultural communication with the non-Muslim world and extremism is an abnormal and isolated occurrence, Mohammed Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League, (MWL) told a conference in New York on Saturday.
“Cultural communication generates understanding among nations … and this leads to the alliance of civilizations,” Al-Issa said.
Extremism “has little foothold in the Muslim world,” he said, and according to the latest estimates, the term could be applied to only one in 200,000 people. “The impact of intellectual and military terrorism and extremism is shrinking, in a clear and tangible way.”
Al-Issa said extremism was a general and comprehensive concept, and to attribute it only to Islam was false since it also had intellectual, political and racial aspects.
He was speaking on the opening day of the International Muslim World League Conference, attended by more than 450 representatives of Islamic institutions and scientific, intellectual and political organizations from around the world.
The two-day conference will discuss issues including cultural contributions from the US and the Islamic world, the Islamic contribution to the promotion of world peace, Muslims in the US, integration and citizenship, and the relationship between the US and the Islamic world.
Yousef bin Ahmad Al-Othaimeen, secretary-general of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, told delegates at the conference that cultural communication enhanced linkage between cultures and helped to close the cultural gap. “We look forward to living in dignity and security and protecting our families and Muslims,” he said.
Al-Othaimeen said more than 1.8 billion Muslims around the world lived in peace and reflected moderate Muslim ideologies.
Abdul Rahman ibn Abdul Aziz Al-Sudais, general president for the Affairs of the Two Holy Mosques, said cultural communication between nations was important, especially between the US and the Muslim world, and essential to Islamic civilization. Confronting terrorism was one of the main objectives of cultural communication, he said.


Saudi Arabian delegation holds UNESCO reception in Paris

Updated 8 min 7 sec ago

Saudi Arabian delegation holds UNESCO reception in Paris

PARIS: The permanent Saudi delegation to the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) held a reception to mark the 40th session of UNESCO’s General Conference in Paris, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Thursday.
The session was held in the presence of the Saudi education minister and deputy chairman of the National Committee for UNESCO, Dr. Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Asheikh.
The session was attended by the permanent delegates of UNESCO member states and senior officials from the organization.
“Today, we see the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 objectives coincide with UNESCO’s mission through the Kingdom’s keenness to support educational, cultural and scientific projects around the world because of its regional and international status, and its roles in strengthening relations between Arab and Islamic countries and the global agenda for sustainable development in the organization’s educational, cultural and scientific fields, Al-Asheikh said in his speech.
He affirmed the Kingdom’s continued cooperation with UNESCO member states in the fields of education, culture and science, and its continued support for the organization’s programs.
He said the Kingdom is one of the founding members of UNESCO, and the sixth country to sign the organization’s charter, on Nov. 4, 1946, upon the directives of the late King Abdul Aziz.