Palestinian Authority plans to sue UK over Balfour Declaration

Protesters wave Palestinian flags and carry a defaced photo of UK Prime Minister Theresa May, and Arthur Balfour, on the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration, in Ramallah, on Nov. 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
Updated 03 November 2017

Palestinian Authority plans to sue UK over Balfour Declaration

LONDON: The Palestinian Authority plans to sue the UK over the 100-year-old Balfour Declaration, which paved the way for the creation of Israel.
It will hire a British law firm to pursue an apology, and plans to explore similar actions in European and other international courts, according to Foreign Minister Riad Malki.
“The Palestinian government has made every effort to persuade the British government to abandon its decision to celebrate the centennial of the Balfour Declaration,” Malki said in an emailed statement quoted by Bloomberg.
Palestinians “will exhaust all possibilities for a partial realization of the stolen justice that was executed by Britain through its ominous promise.”
The Balfour Declaration of 1917 promised a “national home for the Jewish people” in Palestine, and was this week celebrated during a dinner between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his UK counterpart Theresa May.
A protest against the commemoration, organized by the Palestine Solidarity Campaign, will take place today.
The UK government has refused to apologize for the Balfour Declaration, reaffirming instead that it was “proud of its role” in creating the State of Israel.
The Palestinian ambassador to the UK vehemently disagrees with that stance, telling Arab News last month that “the displacement of the Palestinians is a result of that document.”
Netanyahu on Friday told an audience at the Chatham House think-tank in London that the end of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict hinges on recognition of Israel and acceptance of the Balfour Declaration.


Protesters regain control of third bridge in Baghdad

Updated 17 November 2019

Protesters regain control of third bridge in Baghdad

  • Security forces used tear gas and stun bombs to prevent protesters from getting right across Ahrar Bridge in central Baghdad
  • More than 300 people have been killed since the start of mass unrest in Baghdad

BAGHDAD: Iraqi protesters regained control of a third bridge leading to Baghdad’s Green Zone on Sunday, taking further ground in the biggest wave of anti-government demonstrations in decades.
Security forces used tear gas and stun bombs to prevent protesters from getting right across Ahrar Bridge in central Baghdad, part of a weeks-long attempt to disrupt traffic and reach the Green Zone housing government ministry and embassies.
Protesters made a barricade of old cabinets, trash cans and metal sheeting on the bridge while security forces took positions behind blast walls installed to prevent protesters from crossing to the other side. Protesters who choked on the tear gas were evacuated by tuk-tuk, a Reuters cameraman said.
On Saturday, Iraqi demonstrators reoccupied part of adjacent Sinak Bridge and a nearby tall building in Baghdad that security forces had pushed them away from a week before. They have held a third bridge, Jamhuriya, since October 25.
More than 300 people have been killed since the start of mass unrest in Baghdad and southern Iraq in early October, the largest demonstrations since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003.
Protesters are demanding the overthrow of a political class seen as corrupt and beholden to foreign interests.
In Basra in the south, dozens of protesters burned tires and briefly blocked some roads on Sunday, before police managed to restore control and reopen them, police said.
The unrest has shattered the relative calm that followed the defeat of Islamic State in 2017.