’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum
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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum
2 / 3
A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum
3 / 3
A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
Updated 18 February 2018

’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

CAIRO: The Egyptian Museum in Cairo has put on display the “Screaming Mummy” of the son of a pharaoh who may have been hanged for plotting his father’s murder.
Dubbed “the unknown man E,” the mummy which is not usually exhibited appears to be of a man who died an agonizing death.
Egypt’s antiquities ministry has said DNA analysis confirmed the mummy was a son of Ramses III, who ruled between 1186 BC and 1155 BC.
It showed signs that the man had been hanged and shrouded in sheepskin, which the ancient Egyptians considered impure.
Pentawere, the son of Ramses III, was sentenced to hang for his role in the plot, according to an ancient papyrus record of the conspiracy.
Pentawere conspired with his mother Tiye, the second wife of Ramses III, to murder the king.
It is not clear if Ramses III was killed in the plot, but there are indications that he was stabbed in the neck.
An Eye of Horus amulet, representing healing and protection, was placed around Ramses III’s throat, the ministry statement said.


‘I’m not striving for world domination!’: Adolf Hitler namesake wins Namibia election

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, who won an election in Namibia told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology. (Eagle FM/AFP/File Photos)
Updated 03 December 2020

‘I’m not striving for world domination!’: Adolf Hitler namesake wins Namibia election

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, who won an election in Namibia told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology. (Eagle FM/AFP/File Photos)
  • The councillor, whose father named him after the National Socialist leader, won 85 per cent of the vote in the country’s Oshana region

LONDON: A politician named after Nazi leader Adolf Hitler has won a regional election in Namibia.

The councillor, whose father named him after the National Socialist leader, won 85 per cent of the vote in the country’s Oshana region, with 1,196 votes over his opponent’s 213.

Despite the unfortunate name, the full-named Adolf Hitler Uunona, 54, told German newspaper Bild that he did not share the Fuhrer’s ideology and entered politics originally to fight apartheid in southern Africa.

“That I have this name doesn’t mean that I want to subjugate Oshana now. It doesn’t mean that I’m striving for world domination. My father named me after this man. He probably didn’t understand what Adolf Hitler stood for,” the region’s new district administrator said.

“It was a completely normal name for me as a child. It wasn’t until I was growing up that I realized that this man wanted to subjugate the whole world. I have nothing to do with any of these things.”

According to media reports, his wife calls him Adolf and he usually appears in public as Adolf Uunona, leaving out the “Hitler.” But he said it was too late to change his name or update the ballot, adding: “It’s on all the official documents.”

Adolf, or Adolph, is not an uncommon name in the former German colony of Namibia, however most of those still alive with the name were alive before the Second World War.

Namibia still has communities of German-speaking people and is visited by 120,000 Germans each year.

There are German-language newspapers, radio stations, road names, place names and a small German-speaking minority.