’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
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A photo taken on February 14, 2018 shows the "Screaming Mummy" known scientifically as "the unknown man E" on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square. (AFP)
Updated 18 February 2018

’Screaming Mummy’ displayed in Egypt museum

CAIRO: The Egyptian Museum in Cairo has put on display the “Screaming Mummy” of the son of a pharaoh who may have been hanged for plotting his father’s murder.
Dubbed “the unknown man E,” the mummy which is not usually exhibited appears to be of a man who died an agonizing death.
Egypt’s antiquities ministry has said DNA analysis confirmed the mummy was a son of Ramses III, who ruled between 1186 BC and 1155 BC.
It showed signs that the man had been hanged and shrouded in sheepskin, which the ancient Egyptians considered impure.
Pentawere, the son of Ramses III, was sentenced to hang for his role in the plot, according to an ancient papyrus record of the conspiracy.
Pentawere conspired with his mother Tiye, the second wife of Ramses III, to murder the king.
It is not clear if Ramses III was killed in the plot, but there are indications that he was stabbed in the neck.
An Eye of Horus amulet, representing healing and protection, was placed around Ramses III’s throat, the ministry statement said.


Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

Updated 13 November 2019

Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

ATHENS, Greece: An ancient Greek cup awarded as a prize to the marathon winner in the first modern Olympics of 1896 has been returned to Athens from a German university.
Greece’s Culture Ministry says the 6th century B.C. pottery vessel was considered lost for decades until research in 2014 by archaeologist Giorgos Kavvadias identified it in the University of Muenster’s collections.
A ministry statement says it was proved “beyond any doubt” that the two-handled cup painted with ancient runners was the one given to Spiros Louis, the Greek marathon victor in 1896.
Following correspondence with Greek officials, the university agreed to return the cup, which was part of a private German collection it had bought in 1986.
The vessel was presented at a ceremony Wednesday at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.