‘120 Beats per Minute’ wins best film at ‘French Oscars’

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Camelia Jordana holds her Best Female Newcomer Cesar for her role in the film "Le Brio". (REUTERS)
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French film producers Marie-Ange Luciani (L) and Hugues Charbonneau deliver a speech after winning the Best Feature Film award for the film "120 battements par minute" (BPM-Beats Per Minute) during the 43rd edition of the Cesar Awards ceremony at the Salle Pleyel in Paris on Friday. (AFP)
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President of Act Up Paris Remy Hamai (2R) delivers a speech flanked by French screenwriter and film director Robin Campillo (2R) and French film producers Marie-Ange Luciani (2L) and Hugues Charbonneau (L) after winning the Best Feature Film award for the film "120 battements par minute" (BPM-Beats Per Minute) during the 43rd edition of the Cesar Awards ceremony at the Salle Pleyel in Paris on Friday. (AFP)
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Actor Antoine Reinartz holds his Best Supporting Actor Cesar for his role in the film "120 battements par minute" (120 BPM or 120 Beats Per Minute). (REUTERS)
Updated 03 March 2018

‘120 Beats per Minute’ wins best film at ‘French Oscars’

PARIS: “120 Beats per Minute” (120 battements par minute) won best film on Friday night at the “French Oscars” — the Cesars — where many attendees wore white ribbons in protest at violence against women.
The Robin Campillo film, which tells the story of French AIDS activists in the 1990s, received 13 nominations and took home six gongs, including best film.
The best director award went to Albert Dupontel for “Au Revior la-haute,” an adaptation of a Pierre Lemaitre novel about the friendship between two World War I soldiers.
Jeanne Balibar took home best actress for her performance in “Barbara” while Swann Arlaud was awarded best actor for his role in “Petit Paysan.”
 


Don’t abandon us, we don’t transmit coronavirus, say Cairo’s dogs and cats

Updated 27 May 2020

Don’t abandon us, we don’t transmit coronavirus, say Cairo’s dogs and cats

  • Doctors at the clinic decided to let the pets spread the message
  • Pets looked after at home are highly unlikely to spread any disease

CAIRO: The dogs and cats of a Cairo veterinary clinic have an important message, and they are taking it to the Internet.
Don’t abandon us. We don’t spread the coronavirus.
“We started this campaign after noticing that there were many people leaving dogs and cats outside our clinic,” explained veterinarian Corolos Majdi at the Animalia clinic in the Egyptian capital.
Pets looked after at home are highly unlikely to spread any disease, but dogs or cats abandoned on the street can be dangerous, he said.
Doctors at the clinic decided to let the pets spread the message. They began photographing dogs and cats wearing signs explaining that keeping them is safe. The photos are posted on social media sites on the Internet.
“I don’t transmit the coronavirus. Please don’t be frightened of me,” said Loola, a white French Poodle. Or rather that’s what was written on the sign she sported for her photoshoot.
Poosey, a 3-year-old long-haired cat, and Snowy, a white Griffon dog, took turns posing with a sign saying: “I love you. Please don’t throw me out in the street.”
“Please don’t worry, dogs don’t transmit the coronavirus,” said Snowy’s owner, a young girl named Julia Joseph. “God created these animals so we can care for them.”