Bahrain make impressive charge at Asian Games, KSA secure third medal

Bahrain once more made the most impressive charge up the table, adding two golds and a silver to their already impressive haul. (AFP)
Updated 27 August 2018

Bahrain make impressive charge at Asian Games, KSA secure third medal

  • Saudi Arabia secured a third medal at the Asian Games on Monday,
  • Bahrain once more made the most impressive charge up the table, adding two golds and a silver to their already impressive haul

JAKARTA: Saudi Arabia secured a third medal at the Asian Games on Monday, but it was Bahrain once more who made the most impressive charge up the table, adding two golds and a silver to their already impressive haul.
Saudi karateka Raef Al-Turkistani had to settle for silver after being defeated 5-0 in the final of the Men’s Under-75kg final by Iran’s Bahman Asgari Ghoncheh. According to the official Twitter feed of the Saudi Arabia General Sports Authority, Al-Turkistani will be rewarded 300,000 riyals on arrival back home for his exploits at the JCC Plenary Hall.
Inside the nearby Gelora Bung Karno stadium, Bahraini runner Oluwakemi Adekoya secured gold in the Women’s 400-meter Hurdles with a time of 54.48 seconds. The time broke the Asian Games record of 54.87 seconds, which itself had only been achieved the previous evening. Adeyoka’s compatriot, Aminat Jamal, clocked 55.65s to finish narrowly behind Thi Lan Quach of Vietnam and claim bronze. Shortly after, Yavi Winfred won Bahrain its second gold of the day when she completed the Women’s 3,000m Steeplechase in nine minutes 36 seconds.
Around 60km south of Jakarta, at the Pakansari Stadium, the UAE football team qualified for the semifinals of the Men’s Football after overcoming North Korea 5-3 on penalties following a 1-1 draw in regular time. Syria, however, also pushed to extra time in their quarter-final with Vietnam, eventually conceded and were eliminated to miss out on a place in the last four. The war-torn nation did though finish the day with their first medal, courtesy of Majd Eddin Ghzal, who took bronze in the Men’s High Jump.
Jordan also secured a bronze — their eighth of the Games — when Bashar Al-Najjar won his medal match against Saadi Ghulam Abbas of Pakistan in the Men’s Karate Under-75kg. Al-Najjar had lost to Saudi’s Al-Turkistani earlier in the day.
Meanwhile, the Kuwait National Olympic Committee, who had taken its first two medals — both gold — since having its ban overturned on Sunday, continued to enjoy success, adding a further silver on Monday. Ahmad Al-Mesfer lost to Japan’s Ryutaro Araga in the final of the Men’s Under-84kg category. And Qatar’s Ashraf Elseify bagged gold in the Men’s Hammer Throw competition before Yasser Bagharab added a silver in the Men’s 3000m Steeplechase.


NBA star LeBron James opts out of wearing social justice message on Lakers jersey

Updated 12 July 2020

NBA star LeBron James opts out of wearing social justice message on Lakers jersey

  • ‘It is just something that didn’t seriously resonate with my mission, with my goal’
  • But Lakers star still working behind the scenes to improve the lives of others

LOS ANGELES: NBA superstar LeBron James said Saturday he would opt out of wearing a social justice message on the back of his jersey because it doesn’t “resonate with his mission.”
James, who has often spoken out against racism and police brutality in America, is passing on the NBA’s plan to help bring attention to racial inequality by having players wear messages like “I Can’t Breathe” instead of their family names.
“I didn’t go with a name on the back of my jersey,” the Los Angeles Lakers forward James said Saturday. “It was no disrespect to the list that was handed down to all the players.”
“I commend anyone that decides to put something on the back of their jersey. It is just something that didn’t seriously resonate with my mission, with my goal.”
James says he wishes he had had some input into the jersey change.
“I would have loved to have a say on what would have went on the back of the jersey. I had a couple of things in mind, but I wasn’t part of that process which is OK.”
“I don’t need to have something on the back of the jersey for people to understand my mission and what I’m about and what I am here to do.”
The vast majority of NBA players have decided to pick a social justice message when play resumes in Orlando, Florida.
James is one of just about 17 players out of 285 so far who have opted to continue using their family names on the back of their uniforms.
The list of suggested messages, agreed on by the players union and NBA owners and then made available to players, includes “I Can’t Breathe,” which is what George Floyd said more than 20 times before he died with a white police officer kneeling on his neck.
Other messages include: Black Lives Matter; Say Their Names; Vote; Justice; Peace; Equality; Freedom; Enough; Power to the People; Justice Now; Say Her Name; Sí Se Puede (Yes We Can); Liberation; See Us; Hear Us; Respect Us; Love Us; Listen; Listen to Us; Stand Up; Ally; Anti-Racist; I Am A Man; Speak Up; How Many More; Group Economics; Education Reform; and Mentor.
James said even though he isn’t taking part in the jersey messages, he is still working behind the scenes to improve the lives of others, especially people in the Black community.
“Being able to use my platform, use the NBA’s platform, to continue to talk about what’s going on. Because I will not stop until I see real change for us in Black America, for African Americans, for people of color. And I also believe I can do both, though.”
James said he always expected to play in the restart to the season: “I am here for one goal and one goal only and that is to win a championship.”