Bradley Cooper’s directorial debut is love at first sound

Bradley Cooper’s directorial debut is love at first sound
Bradley Cooper directed ‘A Star is Born.’ (AFP)
Updated 05 September 2018

Bradley Cooper’s directorial debut is love at first sound

Bradley Cooper’s directorial debut is love at first sound

VENICE: Musicals are often marvelous, even more so when they croon to the plots of romantic stories. Bradley Cooper's directorial debut, “A Star Is Born,” is one such number.
Starring Lady Gaga, who makes her acting debut, the film — a remake of the 1976 feature with the same title — will tug at your heartstrings with its melodic numbers and sentimental love story.
Gaga and Cooper stun with their performances. While Cooper essays his role of a rapturous rock-n-roll singer with equal élan and ease, Gaga takes it a notch further by doing what she does best — singing. When Jackson Maine (Cooper) hears Ally (Gaga) sing at a karaoke bar one night, it is a case of love at first sound. He is mesmerized by her voice and smitten by her beauty — something that Ally refuses to believe, what with her long nose and unconventional looks.
What follows is Maine cajoling and coaxing Ally to sing with him and become his song writer — together they sing some of the movie’s most heartfelt numbers.
The 1976 version of the film, featuring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, had some terrific music too, but it wasn’t a patch on the scores in “A Star Is Born.”
Gaga is enormously expressive and hauntingly captivating — far more than Streisand in the original — and perfectly complements Cooper with his rugged, romantic and raunchy cowboy looks.
Gaga never lets her star tag cloud her character and we often see her as a young girl — at once vulnerable and innocent — firmly holding on to the belief that she can get her man out of alcohol’s clutches.