Sex assault claim against top court pick should be heard: Trump aide

Christine Blasey Ford “should be heard,” Conway said. (AFP)
Updated 17 September 2018

Sex assault claim against top court pick should be heard: Trump aide

  • “This woman should not be insulted and she should not be ignored,” said Conway
  • Ford told the Post that Kavanaugh “was trying to attack me and remove my clothing” at a teenagers’ party one summer in the early 1980s

WASHINGTON: The woman accusing US President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court pick of sexual assault should be allowed to testify before a Senate committee, Trump’s top female aide said on Monday.
Kellyanne Conway’s comment came as the lawyer for the accuser, college professor Christine Blasey Ford, said Ford is willing to testify publicly about the decades-old incident which she already described to The Washington Post.
The Senate Judiciary Committee is due to vote on the nomination of conservative Judge Brett Kavanaugh on September 20, but in light of Ford’s comments a number of committee members have urged holding off on a vote.
“She should be heard,” Conway said on “Fox and Friends.
“This woman should not be insulted and she should not be ignored,” said Conway, who added that Kavanaugh should also have an opportunity under oath to address Ford’s allegations.
He is “a man of character and integrity” who has been widely lauded by other women, she said.
The testimonies “would be added to the very considerable mountain of evidence and considerations that folks will have when they weigh whether or not to vote for Judge Kavanaugh to be on the Supreme Court.”
But Conway said such testimony “should not unduly delay the vote.”
Asked on CNN whether Ford would be willing to testify publicly before the Judiciary Committee, her lawyer Debra Katz said: “The answer’s yes.”
Lawmakers have not, however, made any such request for her testimony, the lawyer said.
After initially guarding her anonymity, Ford “decided to take control of this and tell this in her own voice” after the allegations were leaked, Katz said.
Ford told the Post that Kavanaugh “was trying to attack me and remove my clothing” at a teenagers’ party one summer in the early 1980s.
Kavanaugh has flatly denied the allegation, saying he did not do this “at any time.”


Global civil unrest and violence in quarter of countries in 2019, expected to rise in 2020: Report

Updated 17 January 2020

Global civil unrest and violence in quarter of countries in 2019, expected to rise in 2020: Report

  • Identified Sudan as most troubled and “extreme risk” country in the world
  • According to the report, 2019’s biggest flashpoint locations were Hong Kong and Chile

LONDON: Nearly a quarter of the world’s nations witnessed a rise in unrest and violence in 2019 with the figure expected to rise in 2020, according to a study released earlier this week.

Verisk Maplecroft, a socio-economic and political analysis company, said in its index of global civil unrest that 47 of the world’s 195 countries were affected and that the number could hit 75 in the year ahead.

The UK-based consultancy firm identified Sudan as the most troubled and “extreme risk” country in the world, which had previously been held by Yemen.

According to the report, 2019’s biggest flashpoint locations were Hong Kong and Chile and neither is expected to be “at peace” for at least two years its researchers claim.

“The reasons for the surge in violent unrest are complex and diverse. In Hong Kong, protests erupted in June 2019 over a proposed bill that would have allowed the extradition of criminal suspects to mainland China, However, the root cause of discontent has been the rollback of civil and political rights since 1997,” the firm said.

“In Chile, protests have been driven by income inequality and high living costs but were triggered by a seemingly trivial 30-peso (USD0.04) increase in the price of metro tickets,” it added.

Other countries now considered hotbeds unrest include Lebanon, Nigeria and Bolivia. Asia and Africa are disproportionately represented with countries such as Ethiopia, India, Pakistan and Zimbabwe also coming under the “extreme risk” label.

Since authoritarian leader Omar Al-Bashir was overthrown in April, Sudan was gripped by protests, violence and killings as armed forces battled democracy supporters for control of the new government.

The index predicts that a further 28 countries examined will see a “deterioration in stability,” suggesting that nearly 40% of all countries will witness disruption and unrest at some point in 2020.

Ukraine, Guinea Bissau and Tajikistan are all expected to see the sharpest rises in unrest, but the report highlights growing concern in the world’s biggest and most powerful countries as well.


Countries identified include the hugely influential nations of Russia, China, Turkey, Brazil and Thailand.

Maplecroft says there will be increased pressure on global firms to exercise corporate responsibility, especially those in countries “rich in natural resources where mining and energy projects often need high levels of protection.”

“However, companies are at substantial danger of complicity if they employ state or private security forces that perpetrate violations,” the report added.