US, South Korea scale back military exercise

The Ohio-class guided-missile submarine USS Michigan is welcomed as it arrives in Busan, South Korea in this April 25, 2017 photo. (AFP)
Updated 22 November 2018
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US, South Korea scale back military exercise

  • ‘Foal Eagle is being reorganized a bit to keep it at a level that will not be harmful to diplomacy’
  • Foal Eagle is the biggest of the regular joint exercises held by the allies, and has always infuriated Pyongyang

WASHINGTON: The United States and South Korea have scaled down an annual joint military exercise scheduled for the spring of 2019 to facilitate nuclear talks with North Korea, US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Wednesday.
“Foal Eagle is being reorganized a bit to keep it at a level that will not be harmful to diplomacy,” Mattis said, adding that it would be “reduced in scope.”
Foal Eagle is the biggest of the regular joint exercises held by the allies, and has always infuriated Pyongyang, which condemned it as preparations for invasion.
But the drill — one of the world’s largest field exercises involving 200,000 South Korean and some 30,000 US soldiers — was delayed and scaled down last year as diplomatic detente took hold on the peninsula.
And following a historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore in June, US President Donald Trump announced that the US would stop holding joint exercises with the South, calling them expensive and “very provocative.”
Since then the two allies have suspended most of their major joint exercises including the Ulchi Freedom Guardian in August and Vigilant Ace, slated for next month.
But more recently progress in talks with the North has stalled, with the US pushing to maintain sanctions against it until its “final, fully verified denuclearization” and Pyongyang condemning US demands as “gangster-like.”
Washington stations 28,500 troops in the South to defend it from its nuclear-armed neighbor, which invaded in 1950.
But differences are beginning to emerge between Seoul and Washington.
The South’s dovish president Moon Jae-in has long favored engagement with the North, which is subject to multiple UN Security Council sanctions over its nuclear and ballistic missile programs.
He has dangled large investment and joint cross-border projects as incentives for steps toward denuclearization, while the US has been adamant pressure should be maintained on Pyongyang until it fully dismantles its weapons programs.
Seoul’s defense ministry said Mattis’ comments were in line with their shared view on the need to back diplomacy — but a spokeswoman added that the question of whether the exercises will take place at all was “still under discussion.”
Kim Hyun-wook, a professor at the South’s state-run Korea National Diplomatic Academy, said reducing the exercise was largely expected.
“The Trump administration claims Pyongyang’s suspension of nuclear and missile tests as the key achievement of its North Korea policy and the joint drills have been postponed as a kind of corresponding measure,” Kim said.
“As long as talks continue, postponing or reducing major US-South Korea joint exercises has become a fait accompli,” he said.
Earlier this month Pyongyang threatened to “seriously” consider returning to its weapons drive if Washington did not end its tough economic sanctions.
And last month, the North’s state media carried a near 1,700-word commentary accusing the US of playing a “double game,” implicitly criticizing Trump for comments aimed at barring Seoul from lifting sanctions against Pyongyang.
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Wednesday defended Washington’s strategy on the peninsula, noting that North Korea had halted missile launches and had not conducted a nuclear test in over a year.
“And I do hope there’ll be a summit between the two leaders early in 2019,” he said in an interview with KCMO radio.
Pyongyang has declared its nuclear and missile development complete, saying it has no further need for testing.
Trump has also said he hopes to have a second meeting with Kim early next year, but talks between Pompeo and a top North Korean official, partly to prepare for the meeting, were canceled.
The US said the North axed the talks because they weren’t ready, and Trump insisted he was in “no rush.”


North Korea faces lowest crop harvest in 5 years, widespread food shortages -UN

Updated 18 min 39 sec ago

North Korea faces lowest crop harvest in 5 years, widespread food shortages -UN

  • South Korea has pledged to provide 50,000 tons of rice aid to its northern neighbor through the UN World Food Programme
  • Sporadic famines are common in North Korea, although a severe nationwide famine in the 1990s killed as many as a million people

SEOUL: North Korea’s crop production this year is expected to drop to its lowest level in five years, bringing serious shortages for 40 percent of the population, as a dry spell and poor irrigation hit an economy already reeling from sanctions over its weapons programs, the United Nations said on Thursday.
In its latest quarterly Crop Prospects and Food Situation report, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said the poor harvest of the country’s main crops, rice and maize, means 10.1 million people are in urgent need of assistance.
“Below-average rains and low irrigation availability between mid-April and mid-July, a critical period for crop development, mainly affected the main season rice and maize crops,” the FAO said. The report, which covers cereal supply and demand around the world and identifies countries that need external food aid, didn’t disclose detailed estimates of production by volume.
North Korea has long struggled with food shortages and a dysfunctional state rationing system, and state media has in recent months warned of drought and other “persisting abnormal phenomena.”
The crops shortfall comes as the country bids to contain the spread of African swine fever in its pig herd, following confirmation of a first case in May.
The disease, fatal to pigs though not harmful to humans, has spread into Asia — including South Korea — since first being detected in China last year, resulting in large-scale culls and reduced production of pork, a staple meat across the region including in North Korea.
The FAO report followed earlier UN assessments this year that the isolated country’s food production last year fell to its lowest level in more than a decade amid a prolonged heatwave, typhoon and floods.
South Korea has pledged to provide 50,000 tons of rice aid to its northern neighbor through the UN World Food Programme (WFP). But its delivery has been delayed by Pyongyang’s lukewarm response amid stalled inter-Korean dialogue and denuclearization talks with the United States, Seoul officials said.
In July, the North’s official KCNA news agency said a campaign to mitigate the effects of drought was under way by digging canals and wells, installing pumps, and using people and vehicles to transport water.
But North Korea has told the United Nations to cut the number of its staff it deploys in the country for aid programs. citing the “politicization of UN assistance by hostile forces.”
Sporadic famines are common in North Korea, but observers said a severe nationwide famine in the 1990s killed as many as a million people.