Arab coalition destroys 86 Houthi-planted naval mines in Red Sea

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The Arab coalition fighting in support of the legitimate Yemeni government destroyed 86 Houthi-planted naval mines in Red Sea. (SPA)
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The Arab coalition fighting in support of the legitimate Yemeni government destroyed 86 Houthi-planted naval mines in Red Sea. (SPA)
Updated 26 November 2018

Arab coalition destroys 86 Houthi-planted naval mines in Red Sea

  • Two types of naval mines were planted by the Iranian-backed Houthi militia, says coalition spokesman
  • Col. Al-Maliki said the Houthi militia’s actions threaten the safety of the international maritime and commercial lines of conduct

JEDDAH: The Arab coalition fighting in support of the legitimate Yemeni government said their forces have discovered and destroyed 86 naval mines since the beginning of military operations.
Spokesman Col. Turki Al-Malki said that as part of efforts to maintain the safety of international maritime and commercial lines in the southern Red Sea, 36 recently planted naval mines were destroyed over the past week, and 13 sea mines were destroyed on Sunday.
These include two types of naval mines that were planted by the Iranian-backed Houthi militia.
Col. Al-Maliki stressed the continued efforts of the coalition’s joint command forces to deal with the threat of these mines on vital coastal installations, fishing boats, beach goers, commercial vessels and giant oil tankers, and effects of regional and international environmental and economic disasters.
He added these contributions fall in line with the coalition and the international community’s efforts to maintain regional and international security and stability in Bab Al-Mandab and the southern Red Sea.
Col. Al-Maliki said the Houthi militia’s actions threaten the safety of the international maritime and commercial lines of conduct and are a flagrant violation of international humanitarian law.
He noted that the Iranian-backed militia’s “acts of terrorism and hostility, including the recent cultivation of these naval mines, is conclusive evidence of the urgency to stop this terrorist group for the interest of regional and international security.
He also said the Houthi militia is not expressing any desire to exert efforts to reach an end to the Yemeni crisis.
“The Houthi terrorist militia bears the legal responsibility for any environmental or economic damage or disasters resulting from its terrorist and hostile actions in the Bab Al-Mandab Strait and the southern Red Sea,” Col. Al-Maliki concluded.


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 16 September 2019

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.