Arab coalition destroys 86 Houthi-planted naval mines in Red Sea

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The Arab coalition fighting in support of the legitimate Yemeni government destroyed 86 Houthi-planted naval mines in Red Sea. (SPA)
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The Arab coalition fighting in support of the legitimate Yemeni government destroyed 86 Houthi-planted naval mines in Red Sea. (SPA)
Updated 26 November 2018

Arab coalition destroys 86 Houthi-planted naval mines in Red Sea

  • Two types of naval mines were planted by the Iranian-backed Houthi militia, says coalition spokesman
  • Col. Al-Maliki said the Houthi militia’s actions threaten the safety of the international maritime and commercial lines of conduct

JEDDAH: The Arab coalition fighting in support of the legitimate Yemeni government said their forces have discovered and destroyed 86 naval mines since the beginning of military operations.
Spokesman Col. Turki Al-Malki said that as part of efforts to maintain the safety of international maritime and commercial lines in the southern Red Sea, 36 recently planted naval mines were destroyed over the past week, and 13 sea mines were destroyed on Sunday.
These include two types of naval mines that were planted by the Iranian-backed Houthi militia.
Col. Al-Maliki stressed the continued efforts of the coalition’s joint command forces to deal with the threat of these mines on vital coastal installations, fishing boats, beach goers, commercial vessels and giant oil tankers, and effects of regional and international environmental and economic disasters.
He added these contributions fall in line with the coalition and the international community’s efforts to maintain regional and international security and stability in Bab Al-Mandab and the southern Red Sea.
Col. Al-Maliki said the Houthi militia’s actions threaten the safety of the international maritime and commercial lines of conduct and are a flagrant violation of international humanitarian law.
He noted that the Iranian-backed militia’s “acts of terrorism and hostility, including the recent cultivation of these naval mines, is conclusive evidence of the urgency to stop this terrorist group for the interest of regional and international security.
He also said the Houthi militia is not expressing any desire to exert efforts to reach an end to the Yemeni crisis.
“The Houthi terrorist militia bears the legal responsibility for any environmental or economic damage or disasters resulting from its terrorist and hostile actions in the Bab Al-Mandab Strait and the southern Red Sea,” Col. Al-Maliki concluded.


Saudi labor minister urges Kingdom to increase economic role of charity sector

Updated 25 min 31 sec ago

Saudi labor minister urges Kingdom to increase economic role of charity sector

  • Saudi Minister of Labor and Social Development Ahmad Al-Rajhi said: “Our effort is to increase the share of the non-profit sector in GDP”

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia needed to increase the contribution of the non-profit sector to the Kingdom’s economic and social development, the country’s labor minister told business conference delegates on Thursday.

Moderating a session on the subject during the final day of the Riyadh Economic Forum (REF), Saudi Minister of Labor and Social Development Ahmad Al-Rajhi said: “Our effort is to increase the share of the non-profit sector in GDP.”

Describing the non-profit sector as the third pillar of sustainable economic development, the minister pointed out that in developed countries its average contribution toward GDP had reached 6 percent.

Referring to a REF study on the sector, he noted that it was only during the last decade that the Kingdom had come to realize its important role in economic development, social participation, job creation, and promoting the culture of teamwork.

“The non-profit sector contributes to Saudi Arabia’s GDP by one percent and our effort is to increase the share,” Al-Rajhi told the session’s attendees.

Presenting the REF study, Yousef bin Othman Al-Huzeim, secretary-general of Al-Anoud Charitable Foundation, said: “This sector, together with its substantial developmental roles, has become a criterion for the overall progress of nations and a yardstick of their civilization and humanitarian activity rather than a mere indicator of individuals’ income.”

He added that the sector had a key part to play in helping to realize the Saudi Vision 2030 goal of achieving sustainable development through diversification, and that the aim was to raise its level of contribution to the country’s GDP from 1 percent to 5 percent by 2030.

The study stressed the need to transform the sector from a mere initiative into an institutional entity concerned with social investment and integration, in cooperation with the public and private sectors.

Among its key findings, the study highlighted the requirement to increase the awareness of sector employees and supervising agencies about the development needs of society.

A lack of detailed information on the non-profit sector in the Kingdom was also having a negative effect on the extent of its contribution to economic and social development, the study found.

The media too had failed to give enough coverage to the sector and rules and regulations often stood in the way of any expansion in individual and community partnerships through charities and trusts.

Princess Nouf bint Mohammed Al-Saud, CEO of the King Khalid Foundation (KKF), said women were the most important enablers of the non-profit sector.

Currently, the most prominent development was the system of NGOs and philanthropic associations, and the stimulation of the sector to implement good governance, she added.

The princess urged the lifting of restrictions on money transfers to the non-profit sector and tax exemptions on charities and donations.

The KKF had issued a number of regulations to help the non-profit sector, she said, but there was still a need for the creation of more executive programs in order to realize Vision 2030 goals.

Rajaa bin Manahi Al-Marzouqi, a professor of economics at Prince Saud Al-Faisal Institute for Diplomatic Studies, in Riyadh, said: “If we look at any economy, it consists of three important sectors, which are the government, private, and non-profit sectors. There is a need to develop the non-profit sector in such a way that it sustains in the long run and contributes to socio-economic development.”