Former White House aide who wrote exposé sues Trump

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with a group of sheriffs from around the country before leaving the White House in Washingto on Feb. 11, 2019, for a trip to El Paso, Texas. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Updated 12 February 2019

Former White House aide who wrote exposé sues Trump

  • Cliff Sims says the government is trying to punish him for writing his book “Team of Vipers”
  • Trump has dismissed Sims as a “low level staffer” whose book was “based on made up stories and fiction”

WASHINGTON: A former White House aide is suing President Donald Trump and arguing the government is trying to illegally penalize him after he wrote a book that portrayed an unflattering picture of life in the West Wing.
Cliff Sims filed a lawsuit Monday in federal court in Washington.
Trump’s campaign accused Sims last month of violating a nondisclosure agreement by publishing his book, “Team of Vipers.”
Trump has dismissed Sims as a “low level staffer.” He said the book was “based on made up stories and fiction.”
Sims’ lawsuit charges the government is using a private surrogate to “serve as an illegitimate cutout” and impose liability through the nondisclosure agreement. Sims argues he learned the information only through his time as a federal employee.
The White House didn’t immediately comment.


Germany extends distancing rules to end of June

Updated 5 min 13 sec ago

Germany extends distancing rules to end of June

  • Up to 10 people will be allowed to gather in public places but Germans should be in contact with as few people as possible
  • Merkel’s government had been embroiled in disagreements with the least-affected states, some of which wanted to open up entirely

BERLIN: Germany has extended social distancing rules aimed at containing the spread of the coronavirus epidemic to June 29, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government said on Tuesday.
Up to 10 people will be allowed to gather in public places but Germans should be in contact with as few people as possible, according to the rules agreed between the federal government and 16 states.
Merkel’s government had been embroiled in disagreements with the least-affected states, some of which wanted to ditch the measures and open up entirely.
Germany’s virus caseload now tops 179,000 with just over 8,300 deaths — much lower than European counterparts such as Britain, France, Spain and Italy.
“This success is mainly based on the fact that the rules on distance and hygiene have been implemented and respected,” the government and the regions said.
However, officials warned that further restrictions could be imposed if local outbreaks made them necessary.