Boxing body approves religiously respectful women’s uniform

Amaiya Zafar, from Oakdale, Minnesota who wants to compete at Tokyo 2020. Switzerland-based AIBA has approved religiously respectful uniform in boxing. (Reuters)
Updated 25 February 2019
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Boxing body approves religiously respectful women’s uniform

LAUSANNE, Switzerland: The international boxing association says it has approved new uniforms for female boxers to wear for religious reasons.
AIBA says “hijabs and full body form-fitting uniforms” have been designed “that do not compromise the competition and therefore the health of the boxers.”
Previously, the boxing association objected to the material of hijab head coverings “which was not designed to fit the body and had potential to come off and interfere in the competition.”
AIBA says the rule change highlights its “commitment to gender equity and religious tolerance.”
AIBA is currently under scrutiny by the International Olympic Committee, which halted formal planning for men’s and women’s boxing tournaments at the 2020 Tokyo Games.
The IOC’s main issue is with AIBA president Gafur Rakhimov, who is on a US Treasury Department sanctions list.


Iran assures FIFA that women can attend football qualifier

Updated 22 September 2019

Iran assures FIFA that women can attend football qualifier

  • FIFA traveled to Iran ahead of the weekend for talks on the matter of women and football
  • The Islamic republic has barred female spectators from football and other stadiums since 1981

MILAN: FIFA has been “assured” that Iran will lift its 40-year ban and allow women to attend a World Cup qualifying game next month.

Football’s governing body wants Iran to end its ban on women entering stadiums that breaches international football statutes prohibiting discrimination.

Global attention on the ban followed the death this month of a 29-year-old activist, Sahar Khodayari, who set herself on fire outside a courthouse. She had been detained for dressing as a man to enter a football stadium in Tehran and faced six months in prison.

“There is women’s football in Iran but we need Iranian women as well to be able to attend the men’s game,” FIFA President Gianni Infantino said in a speech at a conference on women’s football on Sunday. “And we need to push for that with respect but in a strong and forceful way. We cannot wait anymore.

“We have been assured, that as of the next international game of Iran, women will be allowed to enter football stadiums. This is something very important, it is 40 years that this has not happened, with a couple of exceptions, but it is important to move to the next level and to the next stage.”

FIFA sent an inspection team to Iran this week to meet government and football officials ahead of Iran’s match against Cambodia at the 78,000-capacity Azadi Stadium on Oct. 10 — its first home match of the 2022 qualifying competition.

Infantino’s comments drew praise from United States outgoing coach Jill Ellis, who was at the same FIFA conference in Milan, two months after leading the American women’s team to a second successive World Cup title.

“I think it’s huge,” Ellis said. “FIFA has enough of a pull and ability to influence change and I think it’s absolutely the right thing. I mean I don’t think there should be any discrimination period and to not allow women to go see football I think is, I just can’t even wrap my brain around it in terms of it being something. I think if FIFA can influence that, I think it’s great.”