Eid event in Al-Jouf links young Saudis to ‘beautiful and glorious past’

1 / 6
2 / 6
3 / 6
4 / 6
5 / 6
6 / 6
Updated 05 June 2019

Eid event in Al-Jouf links young Saudis to ‘beautiful and glorious past’

  • Eid Al-Fitr has a distinct flavor in Al-Jouf, which has traditions that set it apart from other parts of the Kingdom

SAKAKA: The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) in Al-Jouf organized special events for the first day of Eid Al-Fitr, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
The festivities are being held on Sakaka city’s Al-Dhale’ heritage street.
“Sakaka Awal” will bring together different generations, an SCTH official was quoted as saying.
“The objective of the event is to link young generations to their beautiful and glorious past, and to preserve the popular heritage of the region, including food, traditional clothes, and songs that are usually performed on these occasions,” Yasser bin Ibrahim Al-Ali, SCTH director-general in Al-Jouf, said.
Eid Al-Fitr has a distinct flavor in Al-Jouf, which has traditions that set it apart from other parts of the Kingdom.
There is a custom called Al-Ada. Young people gather palm fronds one or two days before the festival. They assemble these into a pyramid-like form and set the structure alight in preparation for their evening games, which last until the second day of Eid.
There is also the tradition of Al-Khadhab night, when women and young girls wear traditional dresses and adorn their hands and faces with henna.
Another local custom is when neighbors gather for Eid prayers. They salute and kiss each other and share their food. Men and young boys gather for the traditional Saudi Al-Ardheh sword dance and play games. 

 


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 16 September 2019

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.