What We Are Reading Today: Into the Planet by Jill Heinerth

Updated 12 September 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Into the Planet by Jill Heinerth

This book is a firsthand account of exploring the earth’s final frontier: The hidden depths of our oceans and the sunken caves inside our planet.

From one of the top cave divers working today — and one of the very few women in her field — Into the Planet blends science, adventure, and memoir to bring readers face-to-face with the terror and beauty of Earth’s remaining unknowns and the extremes of human capability, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

Written with hair-raising intensity, it is the first book to deliver an intimate account of cave diving, transporting readers deep into inner space, where fear must be reconciled and a mission’s success balances between knowing one’s limits and pushing the envelope of human endurance.

Jill Heinerth—the first person in history to dive deep into an Antarctic iceberg and leader of a team that discovered the ancient watery remains of Mayan civilizations—has descended farther into the inner depths of our planet than any other woman. 

While Heinerth swims beneath our feet in the lifeblood of our planet, she works with biologists discovering new species, physicists tracking climate change, and hydrogeologists examining our finite freshwater reserves.


What We Are Reading Today: Censored

Updated 22 February 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Censored

Author: Margaret E. Roberts

As authoritarian governments around the world develop sophisticated technologies for controlling information, many observers have predicted that these controls would be easily evaded by savvy internet users. In Censored, Margaret Roberts demonstrates that even censorship that is easy to circumvent can still be enormously effective. Taking advantage of digital data harvested from the Chinese internet and leaks from China’s Propaganda Department, Roberts sheds light on how censorship influences the Chinese public. Drawing parallels between censorship in China and the way information is manipulated in the US and other democracies, she reveals how internet users are susceptible to control even in the most open societies, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. Censored gives an unprecedented view of how governments encroach on the media consumption of citizens.