Saudi market regulator in talks with Aramco on IPO rules

Saudi Arabia’s Capital Market Authority (CMA) is in talks with Saudi Aramco and its advisers about the regulatory requirements for listing on the domestic stock exchange. (AFP/File Photo)
Updated 18 September 2019

Saudi market regulator in talks with Aramco on IPO rules

  • Kingdom’s stock market regulator typically requires firms offer at least 20% to 30% of their shares when floating
  • Aramco’s primary listing will be on the Saudi stock exchange (Tadawul) in Riyadh

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Capital Market Authority (CMA) is in talks with Saudi Aramco and its advisers about the regulatory requirements for listing on the domestic stock exchange, its chairman Mohammed bin Abdullah Elkuwaiz told Reuters.
“We continue to have discussions with the company and its advisers on both their readiness, as well as our regulatory requirements for the market,” Kuwaiz said on Wednesday.
Asked whether there will be any waivers or exemptions for the company’s listing, Kuwaiz told Reuters in an interview that the CMA is “still having those discussions.”
The Kingdom’s stock market regulator typically requires firms offer at least 20% to 30% of their shares when floating.
Aramco, whose chairman Yassir Al-Rumayyan said this week that the IPO would be ready within the next year and preparations were continuing despite Saturday’s attacks on its facilities, is yet to file its prospectus with the Saudi regulator.
“We receive waivers or exemption requests where needed and we review them on a case by case basis,” Kuwaiz said, in reference to those discussions.
Aramco’s primary listing will be on the Saudi stock exchange (Tadawul) in Riyadh, but the government is still considering a secondary listing overseas, Saudi finance minister, Mohammed Al-Jadaan told Reuters in an interview on Wednesday.


At Davos, innovative products point to a sustainable future

Updated 24 January 2020

At Davos, innovative products point to a sustainable future

  • A single tree that to bear 40 different types of apple

DAVOS: The World Economic Forum is not all about the fourth industrial revolution or the rise of AI.

You can also find all manner of strange and intriguing products on display from biodegradable plastic made from algae to wallpaper made from recycled corn husks.

One stand titled “How do you design a tree?” is part of a conservation effort where a single tree is designed to bear 40 different types of apple.

Another stand displays colored seaweed on a rack, showing how clothes can be dyed in a sustainable, non-chemically corrosive manner.

Propped along a large wall is Fernando Laposse’s wallpaper made of variations of purple corn husks that are reinforced with recycled cardboard and cork to create wallpaper and furniture. The husks come from corn that needs very little water and can be grown in the desert, which makes it all the more sustainable.

“This initiative helps the local economy as it brings in jobs and a resurgence of crafts and food traditions while also ensuring sustainability,” Laposse said.

Another display shows a machine that extracts pellets from a mixture of algae and starch and is used to create a thread that is the base of 3D printing. These sustainable, biodegradable plastics made from algae are being experimented with in different regions.

With the rise of deep fakes — a branch of synthetic media in which a person in an existing image or video is replaced with someone else’s likeness — another stand delivers a warning on the looming dangers of unregulated software.

The Davos forum prides itself on its sustainability, and key topics have included climate, mobility, energy and the circular economy. Everything is recyclable, and participants must download an application in order to keep up with the program and any changes — a move to cut down on paper waste.