Jameela Jamil flaunts Lebanese florals in New York

The actress picked a floral Elie Saab design for her appearance on ‘The Daily Show.’ (Getty)
Updated 30 September 2019

Jameela Jamil flaunts Lebanese florals in New York

DUBAI: British actress Jameela Jamil was spotted in New York wearing not one but two Middle Eastern designs recently.

“The Good Place” actress made appearances on “The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon” and “The Daily Show” hosted by Trevor Noah wearing designs by Lebanese talent Rami Kadi and designer-to-the-stars Elie Saab respectively.

Jamil spoke to host Jimmy Fallon last week while wearing a tropical-inspired multi-colored dress covered in 3-D floral embellishments and complete with a one-shouldered neckline.

The fashion house calls the decadent dress “The Temple of Flora” gown and it’s certainly worthy of its grand name, with a rainbow of delicate beadwork nestled among feathery flowers covering the over-the-top number.

It seems Jamil was in the mood to turn heads while in New York, as her outfit of choice for her appearance on “The Daily Show” was no less impressive.

While speaking to host Trevor Noah, Jamil opted for a flower-print gown with an off-the-shoulder neckline and tulip-like puffed sleeves.

She paired the colorful, ankle-length dress with white heels and three-tiered yellow earrings.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

I love this @eliesaabworld dress a lot. Thanks for bringing it into my life @luxurylaw

A post shared by Jameela Jamil (@jameelajamilofficial) on

The actress was styled by Hollywood fashion guru Law Roach, who dubs himself an “Image Architect” and regularly works with the likes of Zendaya, Gwen Stefani and Ariana Grande.

While on “The Daily Show,” Jamil discussed the final season of “The Good Place,” embracing body positivity and spearheading a ban on diet ads targeting minors on social media.

The star, who was born to a Pakistani mother and an Indian father in London, has long taken an outspoken stance against photoshopping and airbrushing in the fashion and entertainment industries and even founded the “I Weigh” movement in 2018 by launching an Instagram account where she shares inspiring images sent in by followers detailing their accomplishments and positive characteristics, rather than what they weigh.

“It’s not that I’m starting to love everything about myself. I’m starting to not care about the things that don’t matter and I do care about the things that do matter, like what kind of a friend I am, what kind of a colleague I am, what I am contributing to the world and society and how I make other people around me feel,” Jamil said in the released statement when she was announced as one of the newest members of a body positivity campaign by American Eagle Outfitters’ sub-brand, Aerie, in February.


‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging. (Supplied)
Updated 23 October 2019

‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

MUMBAI: Elia Suleiman’s “It Must Be Heaven,” which was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival, is pure cinema. Like his earlier works, here too the Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, this time to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging.

He says people worldwide now live in fear amid global geopolitical tensions. Today, checkpoints are just about everywhere: In airports, shopping malls, cinemas, highways — the list is endless.

“It Must Be Heaven” was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival. (Supplied) 

Suleiman’s earlier features, such as “Chronicle of a Disappearance” and “Divine Intervention,” showed us everyday life in the occupied Palestinian territories. This time, it is Paris and New York. 

The first scene is hilarious, with a bishop trying to enter a church with his followers. The gatekeeper on the other side of the heavy wooden door is probably too intoxicated and refuses to let the priest in, leading to a comical situation. Suleiman’s life in Nazareth is filled with such incidents — snippets that have been strung together to tell us of tension in society. Neighbors turn out to be selfish, and only generous when they know they are being watched. 

The Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. (Supplied)

In Paris, the cafes along the grand boulevards, and the young women who pass by, are typical of France’s capital. But a cut to Bastille Day, with tanks rolling by in a show of strength, jolts us back to harsh reality. In New York, Suleiman’s cab driver is excited at driving a Palestinian. 

The film has an interesting way of storytelling. The scenes begin as observational shots, but the camera quickly changes positions to show Suleiman watching from the other side of the room or a street. The camera then returns to where it first stood, and this back-and-forth movement is delightfully engaging.

The framing is so perfect, and the colors so bright and beautiful, that each scene looks magical. And as the director looks on at all this with his usual deadpan expression, a sardonic twitch at the corner of his mouth, we know all this is but illusion. There is bitter truth ahead!