Erdogan ‘will resume Syria offensive if cease-fire deal falters’

A Syrian protester gestures during a demonstration in the northern Syrian town of Hasakeh against the Turkish offensive on Kurdish-held towns. (AFP)
Updated 20 October 2019

Erdogan ‘will resume Syria offensive if cease-fire deal falters’

  • Truce aims to stem a humanitarian crisis, which displaced 200,000 civilians in the region

ANKARA: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on Saturday Turkey would press on with its offensive into northeastern Syria and “crush the heads of terrorists” if a deal with Washington on the withdrawal of Kurdish fighters from the area were not fully implemented. Erdogan agreed on Thursday in talks with US Vice President Mike Pence a five-day pause in the offensive to allow time for the Kurdish fighters to withdraw from a “safe zone” Turkey aims to establish in northeast Syria near the Turkish border.
On Saturday the fragile truce was holding along the border, with a few Turkish military vehicles crossing the border, Reuters journalists at the scene said.
In the last 36 hours, there have been 14 “provocative attacks” from Syria, Turkey’s Defense Ministry said, adding it was continuing to coordinate closely with Washington on implementation of the accord.
If the agreement with the US, a NATO ally, falters, Turkey will continue its military operation from where it left off, Erdogan said.
“If it works, it works. If not, we will continue to crush the heads of the terrorists the minute the 120 hours (of the cease-fire) are over,” Erdogan told flag-waving supporters in the central Turkish province of Kayseri.
“If the promises that were made to us are not kept, we will not wait like we did before and we will continue the operation where it left off once the time we set has run out,” he said.
The surprise deal to suspend Turkey’s military offensive in Syria hinged on Erdogan’s demand that Washington agree on a time limit on any cease-fire, a senior Turkish official told Reuters on Friday.

HIGHLIGHTS

• Calm along Turkish border with Syria border after cease-fire. • Ankara urges US to ensure Kurdish militia leaves ‘safe zone.’ • Turkey says offensive will continue if deal is not implemented.

The deal aims to stem a humanitarian crisis, which displaced 200,000 civilians in the region, and ease a security scare over thousands of Daesh captives guarded by the Syrian Kurdish YPG militia targeted by the Turkish assault.
Ankara regards the YPG, the main component of the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), as a terrorist group because of its links to Kurdish insurgents in southeast Turkey.
The planned safe zone would extend more than 30 km deep into Syria. Erdogan said on Friday it would run for some 440 km from west to east along the border, though the US special envoy for Syria said the accord covered a smaller area where Turkish forces and their Syrian rebel allies were fighting.
Erdogan also said on Friday Turkey would set up a dozen observation posts across northeast Syria, and that he would hold talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin on what steps to take in the planned “safe zone” next week.


Emirati soldier in Arab coalition fighting in Yemen killed in Najran

Updated 20 min 24 sec ago

Emirati soldier in Arab coalition fighting in Yemen killed in Najran

RIYADH: An Emirati soldier was killed in Saudi Arabia near the border with Yemen on Wednesday. 
Corporal Tariq Hussein Hassan Al-Baloushi was serving with UAE forces as part of the coalition supporting the Yemeni government against Houthi militants.
The UAE General Command of the Armed Forces said the soldier died “performing his national duty in Najran as part of our forces’ participation in “Operation Decisive Storm” and “Operation Restoring Hope,” state news agency WAM reported.
No further details about his death were provided.
The general command extended its condolences and sympathy to the families of the soldier.
The Arab coalition, which includes Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain intervened in the war in Yemen to restore the internationally-recognized government after it was ousted by the Iran-backed Houthi militia in 2015.
Saudi Arabia’s border areas near Houthi held territory have faced constant attacks from rockets and missiles fired from inside Yemen.