Lido offers a shipshape dining experience aboard the QE2 in Dubai

Lido offers a variety of cuisines and buffets. (Supplied)
Updated 26 October 2019

Lido offers a shipshape dining experience aboard the QE2 in Dubai

  • The restaurant is located on the retired luxury ocean liner QE2
  • The buffet includes soft drinks in the price

DUBAI: The Lido restaurant, which is aboard the floating hotel and retired luxury ocean liner the QE2 in Dubai’s Mina Rashid, offers a culinary world cruise series spanning Asia, the Middle East and the Mediterranean over four nights.

Delhi Delights is on Sundays, East meets East is on Wednesdays, Arabesque is on Thursdays and The Med is on Fridays. 

Its Arabic-themed buffet features the region’s greatest hits including tabbouleh, fattoush and baba ganoush. Other starters available are freekeh salad, chickpea salad, hummus, stuffed vine leaves, pickles and olives.

For mains there are tagines and couscous from Morocco, Levantine mahashi (stuffed vegetables), as well as other regional staples such as grilled meats, shawarma and falafel.

The shawerma was already cut to pieces for the visitors to eat, and unlike the traditional version, had some fresh vegetables.

Desserts on offer include baklava, kunafa, Umm Ali and chocolate cake, with moist and rich textures available throughout the dessert buffet. Despite the Arabic theme, the Middle Eastern offerings paled in comparison to the Western desserts, which seemed unfair to a region so famous for its sticky sweet treats. 

Dinner was a good experience as the staff were attentive and the atmosphere was welcoming. The pastel interior, combined with warm lighting, added to the enjoyment.

Most of the food was decent, although some dishes were exceptionally tasty while others were slightly below average. The standout dishes were the mahashi and ribs, as the vegetables were not overcooked and the meat was soft. juicy and exceptionally flavorful. 

What makes dining here special is the restaurant’s’s distinctive, historic, setting.

The QE2 made its first trip in 1967 from a shipyard in Clydebank, Scotland.

She completed 1,400 voyages across nearly six million nautical miles, hosted almost 2.5 million passengers and finished 25 world tours. She had five restaurants, two cafes, three swimming pools, a 481-seat cinema, a hospital and a casino.

The former liner was famous for its luxury and elegance and was the jewel in the crown of shipping firm Cunard. 

She is now permanently docked at Mina Rashid and houses a museum, restaurants, cafes, a pub, a club, a cabaret-style venue, a hotel, a spa, event rooms and ballrooms decked out in retro decor. 

The QE2 is operated by PCFC Hotels, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of the government of Dubai’s Ports, Customs & Free Zone Corporation.

The culinary world cruise series buffet costs from AED130 ($36) per person. Dinner starts at 7 p.m. and ends at 11 p.m and includes soft drinks.


Photographers reveal Egypt’s hidden gems in show for a good cause

This is the group’s fourth charitable exhibition. (Supplied)
Updated 7 min 23 sec ago

Photographers reveal Egypt’s hidden gems in show for a good cause

  • Cairo Saturday Walks are a group of photographers who go on adventures every week to take pictures across the city
  • The team is now exhibiting its work for charity at a gallery in the city

DUBAI: The Cairo Saturday Walks team, a group of photographers who go on adventures every week to take pictures across the city, are now exhibiting their work for charity at a gallery in the city.

The exhibition brought together more than 50 local, international, professional and amateur photographers who are displaying their work in the Maadi district until Nov. 22.

The youngest participant is 13 and the oldest is 60. (Supplied)

All proceeds from the gallery will go to the restoration of a public facility in one of the underserved areas that the group has walked in and photographed during the past, according to the founder of Cairo Saturday Walks Karim El-Hayawan.

This is the group’s fourth charitable exhibition.

El-Hayawan described the practice as an “organic experience,” during which photographers discover the city’s hidden gems.

The group is displaying its work in the Maadi district until Nov. 22. (Supplied)

What started off as a one-man weekly walk is now a practice shared by 500 photographers.

El-Hayawan’s journey began after he took a basic introductory course in photography. “I did not have time during the week to work on my photography assignments. I used to go out every Saturday to take pictures and I used to post on my account. Then a lot of people started asking me ‘Where are these places? Where do you go? We want to join,’ although (these places) exist 10-15 minutes from anywhere in Cairo, but people did not notice them or had forgotten them,” he told Arab News.

The photographers walk around and discover the city’s hidden gems. (Supplied)

The group has a library of more than 15,000 pictures accessible on Instagram through #cairosaturdaywalks.

“We ask people who join us to share their pictures on that hashtag, with the intention of having a long-term documentation of Cairo,” El-Hayawan said. “Everyone takes pictures from his/her own perspective. It is extremely neutral; everyone takes pictures of whatever they want.”

In two to three years, people can go back to this documentation and see that Cairo looked this way at this time,” he said.

All proceeds from the gallery will go to the restoration of a public facility in one of the underserved areas that the group has walked in and photographed during the past. (Supplied)

A typical Saturday for the photographers starts off at a cafe. “We meet in the morning at a coffee shop and we take a little bus that we rent every Saturday and we just hit the road to somewhere random and we get lost. We call them to pick us up from wherever we reach at the end of the day. The idea is that it has no structure and I really aimed at that from the very beginning,” El-Hayawan said.

What started off as a one-man weekly walk is now a practice shared by 500 photographers. (Supplied)

The youngest participant is 13 and the oldest is 60, but El-Hayawan said that anyone can join the walk and share their pictures.

“I found out about Cairo Saturday Walks from Instagram. The spirit of people I walk with is just amazing. Also, the fact that I am Egyptian yet I still get amazed by Cairo’s streets is what pushes me to explore more every week,” Yara Wael, a 17-year-old photographer, told Arab News.