Turkey to send captured foreign Daesh fighters home, says minister

Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said Turkey had 1,200 foreign Daesh fighters in custody, and had captured 287 during its recent operation in northern Syria. (Reuters)
Updated 08 November 2019

Turkey to send captured foreign Daesh fighters home, says minister

  • Turkish Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu: There is no need to try to escape from it, we will send them back to you. Deal with them how you want
  • Turkey has criticized Western countries for refusing to repatriate their citizens who left to join Daesh in Syria and Iraq

ISTANBUL: Turkey will start sending foreign extremists back to their home countries next week, Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said on Friday.
“Now we are telling you that we are going to send them back to you. We are starting this on Monday,” Soylu said in a speech in Ankara, referring to members of the Daesh group.
Earlier this week, Soylu said Turkey had nearly 1,200 foreign members of Daesh in custody, and had captured 287 during its recent operation in northern Syria.
“We will send three, five, 10 people back,” Soylu said in the speech, which was shown online by local media.
“There is no need to try to escape from it, we will send them back to you. Deal with them how you want,” he added.
Turkey has criticized Western countries for refusing to repatriate their citizens who left to join Daesh in Syria and Iraq, and stripping some of them of their citizenship.
It remains unclear whether Turkey will be able to repatriate those who have lost their citizenship.
Although under the New York Convention of 1961, it is illegal to leave someone stateless, several countries, including Britain and France, have not ratified it, and recent cases have triggered prolonged legal battles.
Britain has stripped more than 100 people of their citizenship for allegedly joining extremist groups abroad.
High-profile cases such as teenage Daesh recruit Shamima Begum, and another alleged recruit Jack Letts, have sparked court proceedings and fierce political debate in Britain.


US coronavirus death toll tops 100,000

Updated 28 May 2020

US coronavirus death toll tops 100,000

  • Nearly 1.7 million infections have been tallied nationwide

WASHINGTON:: The United States has now recorded more than 100,000 coronavirus-related deaths, Johns Hopkins University reported Wednesday — a somber milestone and by far the highest total in the world.
The country reported its first death about three months ago. Since then, nearly 1.7 million infections have been tallied nationwide, according to the Baltimore-based school.
The actual number of deaths and infections is believed to be higher, experts say.
In the last 24 hours, the death toll was on the rise once again, with 1,401 deaths added, after three straight days of tolls under 700. The full death toll stood at 100,396.
The state of New York has seen nearly a third of all coronavirus-related deaths in the United States, where President Donald Trump ordered that flags fly at half-staff last weekend to honor the victims.
The first US virus death was reported on February 26, though officials now say they believe that others may have died of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, before that.
The country passed the 50,000-death threshold barely more than a month ago.
The number of deaths per capita in the United States is nevertheless lower than in several European countries, including Britain, Belgium, France, Italy and Spain.
Despite the grim toll, most US states are now moving toward ending the strict stay-at-home measures that were implemented to curb the spread of the virus.
President Donald Trump, who is running for reelection in November, is eager to stem the economic pain of the lockdown, which has left tens of millions of Americans without jobs.