Four more deaths in Bolivia protests: rights commission

Police launch tear gas to disperse the supporters of former President Evo Morales in La Paz, Bolivia, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. (AP)
Updated 17 November 2019

Four more deaths in Bolivia protests: rights commission

  • The new deaths were announced after five protesters were killed in clashes with security forces on Friday in central Bolivia
  • The Washington-based IACHR, a part of the Organization of American States, also recorded 122 wounded since Friday

LA PAZ, Bolivia: Four more people have died in protests in Bolivia, raising the total number killed in the political unrest to 23, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights said Saturday.

The new deaths were announced after five protesters were killed in clashes with security forces on Friday in central Bolivia, a political stronghold of exiled ex-president Evo Morales.

The Washington-based IACHR, a part of the Organization of American States, also recorded 122 wounded since Friday.

While the rights commission counts nine dead over the past two days, the official government tally remains at five.

Interim leader Jeanine Anez’s cabinet chief Jerjes Justiniano told reporters Saturday night that he would ask for “forensic doctors to speed up their work,” but did not confirm a higher toll.

Fierce clashes between Morales’ supporters and police forces have been ongoing since Anez, 52, declared herself acting president on Tuesday.

The former deputy senate speaker took over the top job to avoid a power vacuum — a move endorsed by the Constitutional Court.

The IACHR said it considers as “serious” her Thursday decree authorizing the armed forces to participate in maintaining order and exempting them from any criminal responsibility.

Morales, 60, said on Twitter that the measure gave “carte blanche and impunity to massacre people.”

Unrest in Bolivia first erupted when Morales — the country’s first indigenous president — was accused of rigging the results of October 20 polls to gain re-election for a fourth term.

He eventually resigned and fled to Mexico after losing the support of Bolivia’s security forces following weeks of protests.


Disney World to reopen as coronavirus cases surge in Florida

Updated 9 min 18 sec ago

Disney World to reopen as coronavirus cases surge in Florida

  • The reopening comes as a huge surge of Floridians have tested positive for the new coronavirus in recent weeks
  • All of Disney’s Orlando parks closed in mid-March in an effort to stop the virus’s spread
ORLANDO, Florida: “The Most Magical Place on Earth” is reopening after nearly four months with new rules in place to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom and Animal Kingdom are reopening Saturday, while Epcot and Disney’s Hollywood Studios will follow four days later.
The reopening comes as a huge surge of Floridians have tested positive for the new coronavirus in recent weeks. Many cities and counties around the state have recently reinstated restrictions that had been lifted in May, when cases seemed to drop.
All of Disney’s Orlando parks closed in mid-March in an effort to stop the virus’s spread. Universal Orlando and SeaWorld Orlando closed around the same time but reopened several weeks ago after instituting similar rules to protect employees and customers from the virus.
Disney’s new rules include mandatory masks and social distancing. Visitors will need reservations to enter a park, and they won’t be allowed to hop between parks. Both visitors and employees will receive temperature checks when they enter. Fireworks shows and parades have been suspended to prevent drawing too many people together.
Disney has been opening its parks back up around the globe for the past two months. In May, the company opened Disney Springs, a complex of shops, restaurants and entertainment venues in Lake Buena Vista.