Daesh claims responsibility for UK knife attack

Daesh claims responsibility for UK knife attack
Police officers work at the scene of Sunday's terror stabbing attack in the Streatham area of south London Monday Feb. 3, 2020. (AP)
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Updated 04 February 2020

Daesh claims responsibility for UK knife attack

Daesh claims responsibility for UK knife attack
  • British govt announces emergency reforms to terror sentencing

LONDON: Daesh has claimed responsibility for a knife attack that injured three people on Sunday in Streatham, south London.
“The perpetrator of the attack in Streatham district in south London yesterday is a fighter of Islamic State (Daesh), and carried out the attack in response to calls to attack the citizens of coalition countries,” said a statement carried by Amaq, a news outlet linked to the group. No evidence was provided to support the claim.
This incident echoes a November 2019 terror attack in London, also claimed by Daesh, in which three people were killed.
Sunday’s attacker, Sudesh Amman, 20, was shot dead by police at the scene. Police say he was wearing a hoax suicide vest.
Amman was under police surveillance and living in a hostel following his release from prison less than two weeks earlier. He had served half of a three-year sentence for terror offenses.

FASTFACT

Sunday’s attacker, Sudesh Amman, 20, was shot dead by police at the scene. Police say he was wearing a hoax suicide vest. Amman was under police surveillance and living in a hostel following his release from prison

Sunday’s attack has prompted concern over the effectiveness of sentencing for terror offenses, with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson swiftly announcing “fundamental changes” to the system.
Justice Secretary Robert Buckland said the attack “makes the case plainly for immediate action.”
He announced “emergency legislation to ensure an end to terrorist offenders getting released automatically having served half of their sentence with no check or review.” The legislation will also apply to serving prisoners, he said.
Amman’s mother said she is “disgusted” by her son’s actions, and he was a “nice and polite boy” who was “always smiling.” She believes he was radicalized in prison and online.


Militants open fire and burn police car in Philippine town

Updated 04 December 2020

Militants open fire and burn police car in Philippine town

Militants open fire and burn police car in Philippine town

COTABATO, Philippines: Dozens of militants aligned with the Daesh group opened fire on a Philippine army detachment and burned a police patrol car in a southern town but withdrew after troops returned fire, officials said Friday.
There were no immediate reports of injuries in Thursday night’s brief attack by the Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters in Datu Piang town. Nevertheless it sparked panic among residents and rekindled fears of a repeat of a 2017 militant siege of southern Marawi city that lasted for five months before being quelled by government forces.
“We are on top of the situation. This is just an isolated case,” regional military commander Lt. Gen. Corleto Vinluan Jr. said in a statement.
Security officials gave differing statements on the motive of the 30 to 50 gunmen. Some said the militants targeted Datu Piang’s police chief over a feud but others speculated that the militants wanted to project that they are still a force to reckon with by attacking the army detachment in the center of the predominantly Muslim town.
Officials denied earlier reports that the militants managed to seize a police station and burn a Roman Catholic church.
When reinforcement troops in armored carriers arrived and opened fire, the militants fled toward a marshland, military officials said.
The Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters is one of a few small armed groups waging a separatist rural insurrection in the south of the largely Roman Catholic nation. The groups opposed a 2014 autonomy deal forged by the largest Muslim rebel group in the south with the Philippine government and have continued on and off attacks despite being weakened by battle setbacks, surrenders and factionalism.
The armed groups include the Abu Sayyaf, which has been blacklisted by the United States and the Philippines as a terrorist organization for kidnappings for ransom, beheadings and bombings.