Khaled Al-Kattan, vice president at Alfaisal University

Prof. Khaled Al-Kattan
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Updated 18 February 2020

Khaled Al-Kattan, vice president at Alfaisal University

  • Al-Kattan has been a senior consultant thoracic surgeon since 2008 and a senior consultant in thoracic surgery and lung transplant at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center

Prof. Khaled Al-Kattan has been vice president of administration and finance and the  dean of the College of Medicine at Alfaisal University in Riyadh since 2015.
He was one of the speakers at the sixth international conference on radiation medicine that took place at the university from Feb. 9 to 13.
About 1,500 delegates, including 50 international speakers, were registered for the conference, the largest of its kind in the Middle East. Topics included diagnostic and interventional radiology, medical physics, nuclear medicine, radiation oncology, radiation protection and safety and radiation emergency management.
“What makes (the conference) unique this year is that we have created new subjects that are related to innovation in health care and Saudi Arabia’s vision in this sector,” said Al-Kattan.
He obtained his bachelor’s degree in medicine from King Saud University  (KSU) in Riyadh in 1984.
He trained at leading institutes in the UK such as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Edinburgh between 1985 and 1989, and Brompton Hospital between 1991 and 1993 where he trained in thoracic surgery. He received lung transplant training at Harefield Hospital and stayed there until 1995.
He joined KSU in 1989 and held many positions, starting as assistant professor at the department of surgery, becoming an associate professor and consultant thoracic surgeon in 1995, before holding his last position in the university as a professor and the head of the thoracic surgery division.
Al-Kattan has been a senior consultant thoracic surgeon since 2008 and a senior consultant in thoracic surgery and lung transplant at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. Twitter: @khaledalkattan


Kids going stir-crazy in isolation? Here’s how to keep them occupied

Updated 10 April 2020

Kids going stir-crazy in isolation? Here’s how to keep them occupied

  • Saudi mothers relate challenges in keeping their children from getting bored amid nationwide lockdown

RIYADH: School’s out for the foreseeable future, but every child’s dream is every mother’s worst nightmare. With nowhere else to go during the day, and most entertainment venues in the city cordoned off, mothers are discussing how the crisis has affected them, and more importantly, what they’re doing to control it.

Dr. Marwa Elagra, an assistant professor at REU, told Arab News about how she and her three children (4th grade, 1st grade, and nursery) were coping with the new social distancing policy and the challenges it posed for their education.

“In the beginning, during the first few days, their schools weren’t yet prepared for the sudden shutdown. It took them almost a week to prepare themselves,” she said.

Despite a somewhat bumpy beginning, things are starting to pick up. 

“They have virtual classes now, and interactive livestreaming with a certain schedule. They can follow up with their teachers, just like in a real classroom. They also send videos that students can watch at any time,” she said.

However, she struggles with getting the children out of “vacation mode,” and convincing them that they still need to study.

“That’s the main challenge in all of this. It’s quite difficult to control the kids around the house, especially since you can’t take them out. They’re jumping around all over the place. They’re doing their homework, but their brains just aren’t in the zone for it,” she said.

They (children) have virtual classes now, and interactive livestreaming with a certain schedule. They can follow up with their teachers, just like in a real classroom. They also send videos that students can watch at any time.

Dr. Marwa Elagra, assistant professor

She hopes that things return to normal soon, or at the very least that a clear plan for the future will emerge after the proposed isolation period is up.

“I hope it doesn’t last for long, especially for primary classes. It is difficult to continue online; they need to interact with their teachers. It is a great pressure on us as moms, we can’t fulfill the role of teachers who are more experienced with children. I am in the academic field myself but I don’t have experience with kids,” she said.

She also has concerns about what these decisions could mean for her children’s academic future and hopes everything will be resolved soon.

“Are they going to give the kids exams or they will end school without them and just count the first term results? Are they going to stop and continue earlier at the beginning of the next academic year? This unclear vision of what will happen is creating the panic between most moms,” she said.

She also has advice for mothers going through the same thing. 

“Have more patience, support and encourage your kids to do more reading, and not only academic reading. Look at the positive side and make use of this long vacation in increasing the knowledge and skills of your kids,” she said.

Dr. May Al-Khudhairy, dean of the College of Applied Medical Sciences at Riyadh Elm University, is making the most of the time she is spending at home with her four children.

“I love having them home because during the week they get home so late that I don’t spend enough quality time with them. I’m even reconsidering all their after-school activities. I’ve forgotten how this time is precious and we need to savor it as long as possible,” she said.

With colleges across the country closed until further notice, Al-Khudhairy is also working from home, a situation that makes it easier to supervise her children and make sure their schoolwork gets done. 

“We sit outdoors and work parallel. The older kids will do their school assignments, and the youngest does her simple Pre-K activities that I find online, from sites like Storynory and Pinterest,” she said.

She recommends that mothers try to keep children occupied with tasks that can be both informative and entertaining. 

“We bake brownies and cupcakes and do experiments, like creating slime at home. Anything to keep busy. They paint, and every day they change it around. And of course, we wash our hands a zillion times a day,” she said.