Britain’s coronavirus peak will be in next few weeks, health minister says

A patient is helped from an ambulance upon arrival at St. Thomas’ Hospital in London in this March 31, 2020 file photo. (AP)
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Updated 03 April 2020

Britain’s coronavirus peak will be in next few weeks, health minister says

  • ‘The modelling suggests that that peak will be slightly sooner than previous’
  • Matt Hancock: No idea if PM Boris Johnson’s self-isolation would end

LONDON: The peak of the United Kingdom’s coronavirus outbreak will be slightly sooner than previously thought and will come in the next few weeks, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said on Friday.
“The modelling suggests that that peak will be slightly sooner than previous, in the next few weeks but it is very, very sensitive to how many people follow the social distancing guidelines,” Hancock told BBC radio.
Hancock also said he had “no idea” if Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s week-long isolation after testing positive for coronavirus would end on Friday.
“I don’t know about his own personal medical condition. What I do know is I’ve been working with him every single day through this crisis,” he said. “He’s been working incredibly hard.”
Asked if Johnson would be out of isolation on Friday, Hancock said: “I’ve absolutely no idea but what I do know is he’s still working.”
Johnson announced a week ago that he had tested positive and would be isolating in Downing Street.


Russia says allegations COVID-19 vaccine is unsafe are groundless

Updated 12 August 2020

Russia says allegations COVID-19 vaccine is unsafe are groundless

  • Moscow’s decision to grant it approval has raised concerns among some experts
  • Only about 10% of clinical trials are successful and some scientists fear Moscow may be putting national prestige before safety

MOSCOW: Russian Health Minister Mikhail Murashko said on Wednesday allegations that Russia’s COVID-19 vaccine was unsafe were groundless and driven by competition, the Interfax news agency reported.
President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday that Russia had become the first country to grant regulatory approval to a COVID-19 vaccine, after less than two months of human testing.
Moscow’s decision to grant it approval has raised concerns among some experts. Only about 10% of clinical trials are successful and some scientists fear Moscow may be putting national prestige before safety.