What We Are Reading Today: Lina Bo Bardi, Drawings by ZeuLer Lima

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Updated 14 July 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Lina Bo Bardi, Drawings by ZeuLer Lima

Lina Bo Bardi (1914–92) was one of the most prolific and visionary architects of the 20th century. Raised in Italy under Mussolini’s fascist regime and emigrating to Brazil after World War II, she championed the power of architecture and design to embrace everyday life.

Her boldly modernist designs range from concrete-and-glass structures like the São Paulo Museum of Art and the culture and leisure center SESC Pompéia to furniture and jewelry.

This is the first book to examine one of the most intimate and expressive features of her life and work, but one she rarely shared with the public—drawing.Bo Bardi produced thousands of drawings in her lifetime, from picturesque landscapes drawn when she was a child, to sketches made as part of her daily routine as an architect, to fanciful drawings that show different aspects of her private life.

In this beautifully illustrated book, Zeuler Lima, the world’s leading authority on Bo Bardi, brings together a careful selection of these and other drawings, many of them never published until now. Bo Bardi drew on card stock, tracing paper, regular paper, and newsprint. She used pencils, watercolor, gouache, ballpoint pens, and felt-tips, producing drawings that combined surrealist elements with an eye for color.


What We Are Reading Today: The Political Machine

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Updated 15 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Political Machine

Author: Adam T. Smith

The Political Machine investigates the essential role that material culture plays in the practices and maintenance of political sovereignty. Through an archaeological exploration of the Bronze Age Caucasus, Adam Smith demonstrates that beyond assemblies of people, polities are just as importantly assemblages of things — from ballots and bullets to crowns, regalia, and licenses. Smith looks at the ways that these assemblages help to forge cohesive publics, separate sovereigns from a wider social mass, and formalize governance — and he considers how these developments continue to shape politics today, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. Smith shows that the formation of polities is as much about the process of manufacturing assemblages as it is about disciplining subjects, and that these material objects or “machines” sustain communities, orders, and institutions. The sensibilities, senses, and sentiments connecting people to things enabled political authority during the Bronze Age and fortify political power even in the contemporary world. Smith provides a detailed account of the transformation of communities in the Caucasus.