Egyptians show solidarity to Sudan after floods

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An aerial view shows buildings and roads submerged by floodwaters near the Nile River in South Khartoum, Sudan September 8, 2020. (Reuters)
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An aerial view shows buildings and roads submerged by floodwaters near the Nile River in South Khartoum, Sudan September 8, 2020. (Reuters)
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Updated 10 September 2020

Egyptians show solidarity to Sudan after floods

  • Dozens of Egyptian celebrities also participated in support of Sudan
  • Egyptian Minister of Health Hala Zayed traveled to Khartoum Tuesday at the head of a medical delegation

CAIRO: Thousands of Egyptians have taken to their social media accounts to express solidarity with the Sudanese people in light of the recent, devastating floods, which resulted in the death and injury of hundreds and the displacement of thousands forced to leave their homes due to the high water levels.
On Twitter, the hashtags #WeStandWithSudan and #FromMyHeartPeaceToKhartoum trended. 
Egyptian Minister of Health Hala Zayed traveled to Khartoum on Tuesday evening at the head of a medical delegation of 20 doctors, nurses, and specialists in the fight against pandemics, bringing with them medical supplies and vaccines.
The minister assured her Sudanese counterpart of Egypt’s full support, affirming that Egypt would be ready to meet any of Sudan’s health needs. 
“We will help you with any shortage of doctors, medical devices or medicines,” Zayed said.
“Our dear people in Sudan need a sincere Arab stance, government aid and urgent donations that alleviate their suffering after this natural disaster that left [many dead], hundreds wounded and countless displaced,” one Tweet said. 
“From my heart, peace to Khartoum. What is happening in Sudan, specifically Khartoum and around it, is a real disaster that is not less [devastating] than the explosion of Beirut, it may be greater. The flooding of the Nile River is a picture worth a million words,” another Tweet said.
Dozens of Egyptian celebrities also participated in support of Sudan. 
Egyptian actress Sherihan wrote on her Twitter account: “May God protect the people of Sudan, peace to Khartoum.” 
Actor Mahmoud Hemida shared pictures of the flood with the comment: “My sincere condolences to the people of Sudan and the victims of the torrents and floods.”
Actor Ahmed Amin published a picture of torrents in Sudan on his Instagram account with the comment: “Egypt and Sudan are an extension of each other by nature.
“Sudan declared a state of emergency now due to the torrents and floods, which have caused deaths, injuries, and the destruction of more than 100 thousand homes,” Amin continued. 
“Businessmen and those capable, support the people of Sudan, help them in their ordeal. Good people deserve a decent life. They have endured so much,” actress May Kassab wrote.
Actor Mohammed Mamdouh wrote: “Sudan is a neighboring country in need and deserves the support of every one of us, just like any country we supported before this. God help them and relieve them from the disaster which they are in.”
Last Monday, Egypt announced the opening of an air bridge with Sudan to send aid to those affected by the floods.
Tamer Al-Rifai, spokesman for the Egyptian military, announced that, under the direction of President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, it was decided to establish the air bridge to send urgent aid to those affected by the floods in Sudan and South Sudan.
Professor Hussein Al-Sayed spoke to Arab News about his memories of Sudan, stressing the kindness of its people. 
Hossam Ali, a university student, told Arab News that the pictures he saw of the flood in Khartoum were very painful. He called on countries to open accounts for public donations to support Sudan and rebuild the homes that were destroyed.
“This is the time for real solidarity between Arab countries, which should not leave the Sudanese people alone in their ordeal,” Ali’s colleague Hana Hussein said.
On Wednesday, talks began between Egypt and Sudan, headed by Zayed, to discuss the needs of the health system in Sudan and support it in overcoming its current crisis. Large quantities of urgent aid have already been supplied to those affected by the floods.


Iran: nuclear deal with world powers worth preserving

Updated 11 min 46 sec ago

Iran: nuclear deal with world powers worth preserving

  • Iran has been steadily breaking restrictions outlined in the 2018 nuclear deal on the amount of uranium it can enrich
  • ‘There is still a broad agreement among the international community that the JCPOA should be preserved’

BERLIN: The head of Iran’s nuclear agency said Monday that the landmark 2015 deal between Tehran and world powers on his country’s atomic program is struggling since the unilateral US withdrawal, but is still worth preserving.
Ali Akbar Salehi told delegates at a conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna that the so-called Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, has been “caught in a quasi-stalemate situation” since President Donald Trump pulled the US out in 2018.
The deal promises Iran economic incentives in exchange for limits on its nuclear program. The remaining world powers in the deal – France, Germany, Britain, China and Russia – have been struggling to offset re-imposed American sanctions.
Iran has been steadily breaking restrictions outlined in the deal on the amount of uranium it can enrich, the purity it can enrich it to, and other limitations in order to pressure those countries to do more.
Salehi, speaking in a video address, said it’s of the “utmost importance” that those countries find a solution to resolve “the difficulties caused by the illegal withdrawal of the US from the deal.”
“There is still a broad agreement among the international community that the JCPOA should be preserved,” he said.
Speaking after Salehi, US Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette made no reference to the deal, saying only that the “United States remains committed to addressing the threats posed by the nuclear programs of both North Korea and Iran.”
“On top of its horrific record as the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism, Iran has a lamentable history of providing only grudging, dilatory, and incomplete cooperation, if at all, with the IAEA. Iran must do more, much more, to ensure both timely and complete compliance with the safeguards obligations,” he said.
The ultimate goal of the JCPOA is to prevent Iran from being able to build a nuclear bomb — something Iran insists it does not want to do.
Though it has broken the pact’s limitations, it still has far less enriched uranium and lower-purity uranium than it had before signing the deal.
It has also continued to allow IAEA inspectors full access to its nuclear facilities, which the world powers still in the deal maintain is reason enough to try and keep it in place.
Iran recently granted the IAEA access to two sites dating from before the deal, which Director General Rafael Grossi said he hoped “will reinforce cooperation and enhance mutual trust.”