Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia

Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia
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Popularized by Indonesian domestic workers hankering for a taste of home, their affordability and unique flavor quickly gave the noodles an almost cult-like status among Saudis and expatriates alike. (Supplied)
Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia
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Popularized by Indonesian domestic workers hankering for a taste of home, their affordability and unique flavor quickly gave the noodles an almost cult-like status among Saudis and expatriates alike. (Supplied)
Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia
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Popularized by Indonesian domestic workers hankering for a taste of home, their affordability and unique flavor quickly gave the noodles an almost cult-like status among Saudis and expatriates alike. (Supplied)
Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia
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Popularized by Indonesian domestic workers hankering for a taste of home, their affordability and unique flavor quickly gave the noodles an almost cult-like status among Saudis and expatriates alike. (Supplied)
Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia
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Popularized by Indonesian domestic workers hankering for a taste of home, their affordability and unique flavor quickly gave the noodles an almost cult-like status among Saudis and expatriates alike. (Supplied)
Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia
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Popularized by Indonesian domestic workers hankering for a taste of home, their affordability and unique flavor quickly gave the noodles an almost cult-like status among Saudis and expatriates alike. (Supplied)
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Updated 01 February 2021

Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia

Indomie: how Nunuk Nuraini left a lasting legacy in Saudi Arabia
  • Indonesian instant noodle brand a staple of every Saudi household since the 1980s

RIYADH: In her dying moments, Nunuk Nuraini, probably did not know how many lives she had touched with the creation of something so simple.

But the creator of the world-famous Indomie noodles’ “Mie Goreng” flavor, left a legacy behind that impacted households across Saudi Arabia and further.

Everyone likes to think they will be remembered for something good, a legacy that maybe helped impact lives – in the case of Nuraini that was a flavor that reminded  Indonesian domestic workers of home and they shared this with their employers who now see the noodles as their “go-to comfort food.”

She could not possibly have known how many lives she touched, but on hearing of her death, fans of the now cult instant noodle brand took to social media to express their appreciation for Nuraini and her creation.




Mie goreng, which translates to ‘fried noodle’ in Indonesian, is the most popular flavor of the Indomie instant-noodle brand.

It is not known what caused her untimely death on Jan. 27  - she was just 59-years-old – but that simple creation is a legacy that many Saudi households will remain eternally grateful for.

Ask any Saudi about their favorite brand of instant noodles, and the answer will almost certainly be “Indomie.”

Launched in Indonesia in 1972, the instant noodles made their way to the Kingdom in 1986. Popularized by Indonesian domestic workers hankering for a taste of home, their affordability and unique flavor quickly gave the noodles an almost cult-like status among Saudis and expats alike.

Indomie’s popularity in the Kingdom eventually led to the creation of three factories in Saudi Arabia to meet the product’s high demand. Indomie’s main factory in Jeddah, the largest in the MENA region, produces up to 2 million packs a day in Jeddah alone, since it opened its doors in 1992.

FASTFACT

Launched in Indonesia in 1972, the quick and tasty noodles made their way to the Kingdom in 1986.

Hospital worker Sarah Al-Suqair told Arab News that Indomie had been an integral part of Saudi kitchens for as long as she could remember, and that preparing and eating the noodles didn’t just take place at home either.

“I remember a time when Indomie cups were the craze of the day at school, and there was a lot of swapping of Indomie cups for money, toys, trinkets, video games and movies, or even favors like doing homework,” she said. “It was the most delicious form of contraband in school, especially when the teachers caught wind of the craze and started banning them.”

Al-Suqair also recounted the wild ways in which students would prepare the instant cups at school, with little access to the boiling water necessary to create the soup.

“I remember some of my classmates getting suspended for sneaking into the chemistry lab and trying to use a Bunsen burner to boil water for the noodles. Another favorite trick was for two students to enter the teachers’ lounge, where one of them would distract the teacher with something menial while the other surreptitiously tried to sneak water from their kettle,” she said.

Nutritionist Leila Bakri told Arab News that her No. 1 weakness was probably a heaping bowl of Indomie mie goreng, something she couldn’t resist no matter how unhealthy it was.

“Instant noodles in general aren’t really healthy food, due to the amount of sodium, MSG, and processed ingredients in them. But I really can’t help it. I grew up eating Indomie at home; I think we all did. It’s easy to make, it’s inexpensive, and really filling. I try to make it healthier by adding chicken, veggies, anything fresh. I even tried making my own version, but the truth is, no matter how much I try, I can never recreate the authentic Indomie flavor,” she said.

Indomie as a brand has secured its place even in the Kingdom’s pop culture sphere. The logo has found its way onto merchandise, such as T-shirts and kitchenware, pins and stickers, and even led to the creation of a short-lived mobile game, Indomie Dash, in 2013. As news of the death of Indomie mie goreng pioneer Nunuk Nuraini broke on Wednesday, people from all over the world flocked to social media to post tributes in her honor, with many fixing up a bowl of noodles and sharing photos to celebrate her life.

Mie goreng, which translates to “fried noodle,” is the most popular flavor of the Indomie instant noodle brand. However, the brand has several flavors and varieties available, from spicy fried noodles, to chicken curry, to beef broth, and even a vegetarian option.

Indofood pioneered instant noodles production in Indonesia, and is one of the largest instant noodle producers in the world. It has regional offices across the globe and Indomie is available in more than 80 countries. Indomie has also experimented with local flavors for several special packets in the countries where the brand is most popular. For example, in Nigeria, one of the largest worldwide consumers of Indomie, a Jollof flavor was released, replicating some of the flavors of the West African rice dish.

The limited availability of those flavors has led to a bizarre black market of instant noodles, with criminally overpriced packs making their way onto Ebay. A pack of five mie goreng packets averages at about SR7.45 ($ 1.9), but a box of 20 packets of Indomie Relish, a flavor released in Nigeria, will run you a whopping $70 (SR 262.5) on Ebay.

Indonesian chefs have also utilized Indomie noodles in unusual ways, such as the creation of an Indomie mie goreng ice cream by West Jakarta-based creamery, Holi Ice Cream.

And the craze hasn’t stopped at food itself. Australian gift vendor Grey Lines put out a line of “Mi Goreng Noodle Scented Candles” in 2019, inspired by the much-loved Indomie brand noodle.

However, other countries will be hard-pressed to match the Kingdom’s love for the noodle.

In an interview with Katadata, a business news site, Indofood CEO Franciscus Welirang said Indomie consumers in Saudi Arabia are now in their second generation. Indomie also dominates 95 percent of the instant noodle market in the Kingdom, despite quite a few contenders, according to the Indonesian Consulate General in Jeddah.


Saudi Arabia announces 10 more COVID-19 deaths

Saudi Arabia announces 10 more COVID-19 deaths
Updated 42 min 14 sec ago

Saudi Arabia announces 10 more COVID-19 deaths

Saudi Arabia announces 10 more COVID-19 deaths
  • The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom has increased to 387,020
  • A total of 6,801 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia announced 10 deaths from COVID-19 and 964 new infections on Friday.
Of the new cases, 402 were recorded in Riyadh, 215 in Makkah, 157 in the the Eastern Province, 39 in Madinah, 36 in Asir, 19 in Tabuk, 18 in Hail, 15 in Jazan, 12 in the Northern Borders region, 10 in Najran and seven in Al-Jouf.
The total number of recoveries in the Kingdom increased to 387,020 after 918 more patients recovered from the virus.
A total of 6,801 people have succumbed to the virus in the Kingdom so far.
Over 6.7 million doses of a COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Saudi Arabia to date.


Saudi Arabia must ‘confront power with power’ in Yemen, says expert

Saudi Arabia must ‘confront power with power’ in Yemen, says expert
Updated 16 April 2021

Saudi Arabia must ‘confront power with power’ in Yemen, says expert

Saudi Arabia must ‘confront power with power’ in Yemen, says expert
  • The Arab coalition destroyed five ballistic missiles and four explosive-laden drones launched by the Houthis toward Jazan on Thursday.

JEDDAH: The international community bears responsibility for prolonging the crisis in Yemen, and Saudi Arabia should not simply wait for the Iran-backed Houthis to cause a disaster, according to a Saudi expert in international relations.

Political analyst Dr. Hamdan Al-Shehri said on Thursday that although a number of proposals had been put forward to put an end to Yemen’s ongoing conflict, there had been a lack of will from the international community to implement those initiatives.

“If the international community was honest, it would have (acted on) UNSC Resolution 2216, demanding the Houthis relinquish the arms they seized from military and security institutions and cease all violence. The international community is delaying taking action against the Houthis for its own interests,” Al-Shehri told Arab News.

“The international community’s regional interests are its top priority, not Yemen or the Yemenis,” he added.

Al-Shehri believes that, in the face of continued silence from the international community, Saudi Arabia should ‘confront power with power’ when dealing with Houthi attacks.

“We should not wait until the Houthis (cause) a disaster. We count on the Arab coalition and the Yemeni army, especially after the UN’s leniency with regard to putting pressure on the Houthis to accept diplomatic solutions,” Al-Shehri said.

He added that if attacks on the Kingdom continue, then Saudi Arabia should take military action. “The Houthis are using power and this power should be confronted with power. We have tried the international community for seven years, but unfortunately (nothing has been done).”

The Arab coalition destroyed five ballistic missiles and four explosive-laden drones launched by the Houthis toward Jazan, Al-Ekhbariya reported on Thursday.

Those attacks were the latest in a long line of hostile actions against the Kingdom by the Iran-backed Houthi militia.

Jazan University was one of the targets, as well as other civilian sites protected under international humanitarian law, coalition spokesman Turki Al-Malki said in a statement to the Saudi Press Agency, adding that such actions amount to war crimes. He also said that the attacks originated from Yemen’s Saadah governorate and were a “continuation of the Houthis’ systematic and intentional hostile attempts to target civilians.”

The Houthis, who took over the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, in 2014, have been widely condemned for their actions against the Kingdom.


62 Jeddah outlets shut for COVID-19 breaches

62 Jeddah outlets shut for COVID-19 breaches
Updated 16 April 2021

62 Jeddah outlets shut for COVID-19 breaches

62 Jeddah outlets shut for COVID-19 breaches

JEDDAH: Authorities in Jeddah have shut down 62 commercial outlets for breaching coronavirus disease (COVID-19) protocols.
Municipalities in the Kingdom have stepped up their efforts to ensure compliance with COVID-19 safety measures designed to protect public health.
The municipality of Jeddah governorate carried out 4,219 inspection tours of commercial centers and facilities and identified 166 violations for issues related to overcrowding and the failure to effectively use the Tawakkalna app.
Officials urged people to report any suspected breaches of COVID-19 regulations to the 940 call-center number.


Saudi students win four awards in European Girls’ Mathematical Olympiad

Saudi students win four awards in European Girls’ Mathematical Olympiad
Updated 16 April 2021

Saudi students win four awards in European Girls’ Mathematical Olympiad

Saudi students win four awards in European Girls’ Mathematical Olympiad

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia ranked 16th of 55 countries in the European Girls’ Mathematical Olympiad (EGMO), which ended on Thursday, rising 10 places from last year and winning four medals.
Each country involved in the competition is represented by a team of four female mathematicians of school age, This year’s EGMO was hosted by Georgia, but held remotely due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Saudi Arabia was represented by four students who have all been members of programs run by the King Abdul Aziz and His Companions Foundation for Giftedness and Creativity (Mawhiba) and have received thousands of training hours and attended several training camps.
In the past, Saudi teams have won 20 medals at the EGMO. This year, Rafaa Qanash from Jeddah won a silver medal, while Lara Munqal from Jeddah, Joud Bahwini from Yanbu, and Fatima Al-Ghanam from Al-Ahsa all won bronze medals.
All four students have been members of Mawhiba’s Program for International Olympiads and have received thousands of training hours and attended several training camps.
Mawhiba works in partnership with the Ministry of Education to qualify Saudis to compete in scientific Olympiads. Over 1,300 hours of training are provided annually to prepare students to participate.
The EGMO — launched by the UK in 2012, when 19 countries participated — seeks to encourage female students to compete in mathematics tournaments and to increase female representation in international Olympiads. Currently, only 10 percent of participants in math-based Olympiads are female.


Want to visit Saudi Arabia for Umrah? Here are the procedures you need to know about

Want to visit Saudi Arabia for Umrah? Here are the procedures you need to know about
Updated 16 April 2021

Want to visit Saudi Arabia for Umrah? Here are the procedures you need to know about

Want to visit Saudi Arabia for Umrah? Here are the procedures you need to know about
  • Saudi Arabia reported 10 more COVID-19-related deaths on Thursday

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Hajj and Umrah has announced the procedures for pilgrims coming from outside the Kingdom to follow to perform the rituals.
Pilgrims need to go to a care center in Makkah six hours before performing Umrah to check the inoculation status according to the type of approved vaccines.
They will be handed their bracelet, which they must put on at the center. They will then be directed to the Al-Shubaikha gathering center. There, the pilgrims must present their bracelet to verify their data and their permit.
The ministry noted the need for the pilgrims to abide by the Umrah date and time period allocated to them.
The Kingdom began receiving pilgrims from abroad in mid-March, in accordance with requirements and controls set by the Ministry of Health as part of the precautionary measures set to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
The Ministry of Hajj and Umrah had previously confirmed the launch of the two updated versions of the apps “Eatmarna” and “Tawakkalna,” in cooperation with the Saudi Authority for Data and Artificial Intelligence.
Through these apps, Saudis and expats can reserve Umrah and visit and prayer permits inside the Grand Mosque during the holy month of Ramadan, with permits being displayed only on the Tawakkalna app.
The Ministry of Hajj and Umrah emphasized the need to adhere to the precautionary and preventive measures, and to reserve permits through the approved official platforms.
Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia reported 10 more COVID-19-related deaths on Thursday. The death toll now stands at 6,791.
The Ministry of Health reported 985 new cases, meaning that 402,142 people have now contracted the disease, of which 9,249 remain active.
It said 463 of the new cases were in Riyadh, 164 in Makkah, 140 in the Eastern Province and 30 in Madinah. In addition, 661 patients recovered from the disease, bringing the total to 386,102 recoveries.
Saudi Arabia has so far conducted more than 16 million PCR tests, with 45,843 carried out in the past 24 hours.
Saudi health clinics set up by the ministry as testing hubs or treatment centers have helped hundreds of thousands of people around the Kingdom since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic.
Among those testing hubs are Taakad (make sure) centers and Tetamman (rest assured) clinics.
Taakad centers provide COVID-19 testing for those who show no or mild symptoms or believe they have come into contact with an infected individual, while the Tetamman clinics offer treatment and advice to those with virus symptoms, such as fever, loss of taste and smell and breathing difficulties.
Appointments to either services can also be made through the ministry’s Sehhaty app.
Saudis and expats in the Kingdom continue to receive their jabs of the coronavirus vaccine, with 6,607,384 people having been inoculated so far.